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History in Motion - Paul Cashman

Grades
6 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Design an animated timeline that will move simultaneously with a map. Include descriptions of events, display images, and embed videos along each point of the timeline. Register to...more
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Design an animated timeline that will move simultaneously with a map. Include descriptions of events, display images, and embed videos along each point of the timeline. Register to get started. Be sure to watch the introductory video before starting a project/scenario. Start by selecting the beginning and ending points. After that, fill in the events, images, and videos. Editing is possible at any time. Video tutorials are available for each step. Share your scenario via URL. Some videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): animation (65), maps (293), timelines (64)

In the Classroom

Create a History in Motion timeline to share with the entire class to introduce them to the program, or simply watch the introductory video together using an interactive whiteboard or projector. There are also example projects to view. If your class discusses current events, this would be an excellent tool to use to track the history of certain issues. To do this more easily use a tool like Wide Angle Window Into Global History, reviewed here. Language arts students can trace the events in a novel and history students can trace historical events such as the Civil Rights Movement (or certain aspects of) or famous people. When assigning a biography for math or science use this tool to trace where and when the famous person's theories or inventions spread. Now that would be an interesting take on a biography project! Be sure to share the URL on your class web page for students to work on the program and watch the "How-To" videos at home.

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