TeachersFirst's China and Cross-Cultural Resources

Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections

Every culture tends to focus on its own way of thinking and doing. In order to prepare our students for life, twenty-first century classrooms must foster cross-cultural understanding as a vital aspect of learning in today's global society. This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected to help teachers and students build a better understanding of other cultures, especially China, through related projects and classroom activities. We welcome suggestions of additional free teaching resources for our team to review. Please mention "cross-cultural" in your message.

 

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The Great Human Odyssey - A World of Extremes - CBC

Grades
6 to 12
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The Great Human Odyssey is a powerful journey into the lives of three different cultures and the lives of nomads. Explore the sea, desert, and tundra as you become the ...more
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The Great Human Odyssey is a powerful journey into the lives of three different cultures and the lives of nomads. Explore the sea, desert, and tundra as you become the nomad and view life from a first person perspective. Along the way click on icons as they pop-up to provide additional information through videos and photographs.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), deserts (10), oceans (148), tundra (14)

In the Classroom

The Great Human Odyssey is perfect for use with an interactive whiteboard or projector. View the different sections together to learn more about life in extreme climates. Have students use Fakebook, reviewed here, to create a "fake" page similar in style to Facebook about one of the nomads. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast student lifestyles with those on this site. Compare the three nomadic lifestyles presented with the Venn Diagram - 3 Circles, reviewed here. Have students create maps using Animaps, reviewed here, to locate places found on this site and explore areas close by. Students can add text, images, and location stops!

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Global Trend Map - Paul Bourke

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6 to 12
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Discover what is trending on Google with the interactive Global Trend Map. Use the drop down box to choose a country and change the visual appearance of the map if ...more
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Discover what is trending on Google with the interactive Global Trend Map. Use the drop down box to choose a country and change the visual appearance of the map if desired. The top Google searches for that country appear in a list with the top trend written across the chosen country. Click the Translate button to translate into English. Get the embed code to share this on your website or blog.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), maps (287), news (261)

In the Classroom

This site is excellent for enrichment during current events lessons. World language classes can keep up with hot topics in the countries where the language they are learning is spoken. Include this link on your class web page for students to access both in and out of class. Challenge students to compare and contrast trends across different countries using an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here. Have students create a presentation on any of the trending topics using Swipe, reviewed here.

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Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future - UNESCO

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6 to 12
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Make a difference in students' lives and the world as you practice teaching and learning for a sustainable future. This site includes a teacher education program focused on the many...more
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Make a difference in students' lives and the world as you practice teaching and learning for a sustainable future. This site includes a teacher education program focused on the many aspects of a sustainable future and directing education to meet these needs. The first five modules provide background knowledge for the global challenges and need for education to address these problems. The topics include exploring global realities, understanding sustainable development, future perspectives, reorienting education for a sustainable future, and accepting the challenge. The next four modules illustrate ways to integrate these themes into your curriculum. The next nine interdisciplinary modules explore how to form a sustainable future. Find areas such as culture and religion, indigenous knowledge, women, population, world hunger, agriculture, tourism, communities, globalization, and climate change. There are resources and lesson plans for experiential learning, storytelling, values education, inquiry learning assessment, future problem-solving, learning outside the classroom, and community problem solving. See sections that provide explanations, characteristics, analyzation, and reflections to help you effectively integrate these classroom teaching practices into your curriculum.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105), debate (41), problem solving (272), sustainability (19)

In the Classroom

Connect students globally with challenges that people face around the world. Begin by building your knowledge with the activities and resources provided. Continue by choosing different areas to explore as a class, in small groups, or individually. These activities can become a focal point of problem-based learning scenarios. Consider viewing Google Lit Trips, reviewed here, and challenge students to create a "sustainable earth" trip. Document areas on the globe with videos, images, and text that you and students find. Add a link to Pinterest, reviewed here, to have an ongoing brainstorming session of all possible solutions. Use parts of the site to begin a Global Connections Club either in class or after school. Students can share a Google doc or wiki to foster group collaboration. Not comfortable with wikis? Check out the TeachersFirst Wiki Walk-Through. Focus on problem solving by sharing parts of Teaching and Learning for a Sustainable Future. Teach debate through the different sides of the issues presented. During current events, engage students in saving our most valuable resource, our Earth. Use as a nonfiction passage for close reading. Have students take information research further, and present to others in a different format. Begin a blog for each student to share reflections. Create a newspaper using a site such as Zinepal, reviewed here. Use at a community night to promote awareness of the need for sustainability in your community.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Q-Files The Great Illustrated Encyclopedia - Q-Files Ltd

Grades
2 to 12
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Use Q-Files The Great Illustrated Encyclopedia to provide extra informational reading resources. Subject areas include prehistoric and ancient history, culture, geography, space, technology,...more
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Use Q-Files The Great Illustrated Encyclopedia to provide extra informational reading resources. Subject areas include prehistoric and ancient history, culture, geography, space, technology, science, life, and Earth. Each article includes pictures with accompanying text. This collection is continuing to grow. Q-Files is free, online, with no advertisements. Ebooks on nonfiction topics are available for purchase.

tag(s): aircraft (24), amphibians (20), animals (276), asia (73), aztecs (8), birds (50), china (66), cultures (105), dinosaurs (57), earth (228), earthquakes (48), ecosystems (88), electricity (88), energy (198), erosion (17), europe (75), forces (45), insects (69), literature (275), mammals (32), mayans (12), medicine (67), microscopes (13), moon (72), oceans (148), photography (160), planets (123), polar (19), population (60), religions (61), rocks (49), romans (35), scientists (69), solar system (119), space (205), sports (97), telescopes (8), vikings (10), weather (188)

In the Classroom

Use Q-Files as an informational reading source for a variety of subjects. In science and social studies use as a way to provide background information for inquiry-based projects. Have students use resources for multimedia projects such as Slidestory, reviewed here, Prezi reviewed here, or Flipboard, reviewed here, to share their findings. Pair these articles with literature to provide a better background information base, such as information on ancient China or Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin. Add as a bookmark to student computers and on your class website.

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The Wonderment - Kidnected World

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3 to 9
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Enjoy and challenge creativity and problem-solving skills in a world of wonder. Once you sign up for Wonderment, a social platform for kids, choose a bot or secret identity. Given ...more
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Enjoy and challenge creativity and problem-solving skills in a world of wonder. Once you sign up for Wonderment, a social platform for kids, choose a bot or secret identity. Given a choice to follow many different paths, kids determine the subject of interest. The paths are real-world problems from around the globe. View a video, story, or idea. Design a response using text, photos, or a video. Join a chat to allow comments or ask questions to make global connections. After each posting, special points are added to make the bot design more elaborate. A personal Wondermeter rises with each response. Through donations, this non-profit brings technology to children around the world. A call for adults to serve as mentors to respond to each child challenges adults to join in the fun and make the world a better place. Register with email. Children under 13 need parent or teacher approval to participate. Watch the two short videos to see an explanation for The Wonderment and How It Works.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), enrichment (13), gifted (96), listening (91), problem solving (272), social media (16), social networking (112), social skills (20), speaking (24)

In the Classroom

Wonderment is a problem based learning adventure for each student around the world to communicate and collaborate with other students. This venue allows great lesson ideas for digital citizenship and digital footprints. Begin by choosing a path for the entire class and feature on an interactive whiteboard. Have students work in small groups to choose their best response. Discussions after can focus on creativity, problem solving, and collaboration between the group and others from around the world. In a gifted class, use as a way to challenge kids to break through the "right answer" and find the "best answer." Use this as a model for finding authentic needs in your community. Be sure to share a link to this tool on your class blog, website, or Edmodo account. Use this tool as the answer for the parents who always want more challenge and enrichment for their students at home. Be sure to share at a staff meeting to spread the wonder for other students and adults.

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Wide Angle Window Into Global History - PBS

Grades
6 to 12
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Looking for videos and resources that peer into Global Issues? Start with this resource! Click the Video Bank to view resources by themes: conflict, power, human rights, social structures,...more
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Looking for videos and resources that peer into Global Issues? Start with this resource! Click the Video Bank to view resources by themes: conflict, power, human rights, social structures, migrations, economic systems, factors of production, or political systems. Also, view the video bank by location in the world. Videos in each theme are up to several minutes in length and are clips of larger videos. Click on the video of choice, to view the video on a larger screen, see the guiding questions, read the background essay and transcript, and find related links. Text can easily be printed using the print function along the bottom. Videos are easily downloaded, with directions for both PC and Mac users. View the country and region map along the left side along with the accompanying lesson plan. Additionally, click on Lesson Plans instead to display the following for each global issue: overview, learning objectives and standards, media components (with links), and materials. Be sure to note the Prep for Teachers along the bottom of each lesson plan.
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tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105), maps (287)

In the Classroom

These resources and videos are extremely flexible for classroom use. Use the film clips for current events, and to also highlight events from the past. Use a video segment to get students thinking about past incidents, solutions, and whether today's environment has changed from that of the past. View a variety of clips from one theme and discuss events in the clip or use a writing assignment to provide time to process the events. Discuss in what ways these clips are similar and other societal, economic, and political factors that affected them. Use any of these videos to find any current events that are still dealing with the same issue today. Be sure to brainstorm how different people, in other areas of the world, would view these issues. Research these issues using resources from other areas of the world to see editorials and news clippings that are not American. Note: Use the country code after your search term or use this news search. Were there other people interviewed about any of these issues? Who are they and what did they say? Consider creating videos showcasing a variety of viewpoints. Use one of the video tools reviewed at the TeachersFirst Edge. Besides the viewpoint of each video, what would be a common question that all videos within the theme have in common? How does the bubble of our American culture hamper our understanding of other people both here in the U.S. and abroad? Research the history and culture of the various areas to identify factors responsible for the themes portrayed by this resource.

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The World Cup of Everything Else - Wall Street Journal

Grades
6 to 12
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Discover "how the tournament would play out if 32 countries were competing in things other than soccer." This site compares world countries statistics on scores of topics, instantly...more
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Discover "how the tournament would play out if 32 countries were competing in things other than soccer." This site compares world countries statistics on scores of topics, instantly drawing a "bracket" of the top 32 countries for that statistic around the world. Find out which country "wins" in categories as diverse as milk consumption, population density, or ticket sales for the movie Frozen! Click the topic at left to display the "bracket" instantly. Try predicting who will win as you check out all kinds of topics.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), demographics (19), statistics (122)

In the Classroom

This site would fit well in a world cultures/social studies class or even as part of an information literacy lesson. Math teachers can use it to show the usefulness of statistics. World language teachers may want to include it as part of cultural study. Share this site briefly on an interactive whiteboard or projector to spark discussion about what statistics can tell you about a country. Then turn groups loose to predict the outcomes of the "competition" in various categories. Have them keep a record: What do they predict? Why? Were they right? What might be the possible reasons for the "winner" (or loser) in the category they chose? What other statistical competitions would they like to see to gain the best profile of a country? As a class, try to name the top ten most revealing statistics they would like to see that are not already listed here. Then have them look for sources where they might find that information! Extend the findings by having student groups create infographics about their chosen "world cup" topic. Use a tool such as Easel.ly, reviewed here or Venngage reviewed here. In a government class, use this site to open discussion about the role of statistics in governing and meeting the needs of your citizens. For more demographics resources, try these or Knoema, a worldwide data source.

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Big Dayta - Tsai Hsing School

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3 to 12
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What do you do in a day? Join a worldwide classroom sharing project for students to learn about life in other schools and cultures. This teacher-driven project, begun as a ...more
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What do you do in a day? Join a worldwide classroom sharing project for students to learn about life in other schools and cultures. This teacher-driven project, begun as a collaboration between schools in Tai Pei and California, collects "unique student-generated global dayta" about students' daily life using a simple, online Google Form. Day + data = DAYTA. The dayta is available for your classroom to use in loads of different math, social studies, and writing activities. Click to add your class using the Contact button. The project encourages you to form collaborations with another school. Click the link to the Idea Guide to find curriculum connections and lesson ideas. The project is adding new classes, so why not join in? Be sure to check out the community area where you can share your successes and questions with other teachers.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), data (148)

In the Classroom

Introduce Big Dayta in your world cultures, math, or writing class. If you team teach, work together with your computer, math, social studies, or English teacher to have students share dayta and then analyze and use it for your own class projects. Find specific curriculum activities for math, writing, and social studies classes on the site or ask your students what dayta they would like to compare and contrast in a "hands-on" experience with data. If they like learning about life in other places, your class may also want to join in #XW1W (Across the World Once a Week). Be sure to pass these projects along to other teachers! As a geography extension, have students create an electronic placemarker file using Google Maps or MapSkip or an actual map poster of the places they learn about.

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Explore America - Ballard-Tighe

Grades
5 to 12
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This site is an excellent way for ESL/ELL students to learn more about the history of America. Beginning before Columbus discovered America, and continuing into the present, it presents...more
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This site is an excellent way for ESL/ELL students to learn more about the history of America. Beginning before Columbus discovered America, and continuing into the present, it presents interactive activities, reference assistance, vocabulary activities, and a glossary to ensure student interest and comprehension. Authentic sounds and great attention to detail make the site attractive to students. Complete lesson plans help instructors incorporate the website material with background knowledge using a variety of skills. The Student Research Guide suggests fiction and nonfiction books to read. A built-in dictionary allows students to translate key terms into Spanish, Arabic, Korean and Hmong.

tag(s): colonial america (107), cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105)

In the Classroom

The interactive activities would work well at a learning station or in a computer lab. The text portions might be challenging. Pair weaker readers with a stronger reader. After completing the interactive activities, have students create their own comics to highlight a specific historical era using comic-creation tools from TeachersFirst's Comic Resources. Or challenge your students to use a site such as Timetoast, reviewed here, to create timelines of important historical events and periods.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Sound Infusion - Cultural Infusion - a social enterprise

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3 to 12
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Sound Infusion is part of a larger site about world cultures, Cultural Infusion. Use the menu on the right to learn about cultural information. Listen to sound loops of instruments...more
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Sound Infusion is part of a larger site about world cultures, Cultural Infusion. Use the menu on the right to learn about cultural information. Listen to sound loops of instruments from different cultures, compose music from those sound loops, and get a manual for using the program. By clicking on Cultural Information, you can select a country and find out about the geography and topography, history, performing arts, and other interesting facts. For performing arts, you will learn about dance and musical instruments and watch videos about both. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105), musical instruments (48)

In the Classroom

Use this site on a projector or interactive whiteboard to discuss and informally assess prior knowledge as you start your study of any country or culture. This site is excellent for enrichment. Include it on your class website for students to access both in and out of class. ESL and ELL students will be proud to make presentations about their country of origin using this site as backup and illustration. Be sure to ask them to compose music from the music loops and share with the class. Have individuals or partners create music for the country they are researching and make it into a podcast using Spreaker, reviewed here, to share with their friends and family. Share this site with world language classes as a general resource for cultural information.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Visualizing Cultures - MIT

Grades
8 to 12
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We see cultures through our own eyes, a lens that is influenced by our own frame of reference and experiences. Another way to learn about cultures is to view them ...more
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We see cultures through our own eyes, a lens that is influenced by our own frame of reference and experiences. Another way to learn about cultures is to view them through the eyes of others through an examination of images created by others. Visualizing Cultures brings us images from Asia, many not widely circulated before, that illustrate historical events such as the Opium Wars, the Boxer Rebellion, the Black Ships, and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Each set of images is accompanied by narratives, lesson plans, and printable handouts to provide context. While we may have seen photographs of Hiroshima's devastation, we can now view the story through the eyes and drawings of Japanese survivors.

tag(s): asia (73), china (66), cross cultural understanding (115), japan (61), perspective (11), visualizations (14)

In the Classroom

Perspective taking is an important skill in learning about other cultures and other time periods. To Western eyes, these images will provide a fresh look at historical events. It is important to note, and to help students understand, that the images are uncensored and may depict a way of seeing others that, to us, may seem racist or disrespectful. Screen the images to determine how they might be best used to help students see the world through others' eyes, and how to manage a discussion of these themes.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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National Anthems - INF Anthems

Grades
1 to 12
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Download and listen to instrumental National Anthems from many countries and territories throughout the world. Some also have the lyrics. A very few have the vocal anthem (Flash required)....more
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Download and listen to instrumental National Anthems from many countries and territories throughout the world. Some also have the lyrics. A very few have the vocal anthem (Flash required). And some only provide lyrics and no sound. Included are pictures of national flags and passports. All instrumentals for the anthems are downloaded in MP3 format. There are download instructions for various browsers. This site has many advertisements, but it is worth the distractions.
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tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), national anthem (4)

In the Classroom

Use this tool in a world language, history, or current events class. In a music class have the students listen to the anthem, and find the sheet music for them to learn to play it. Students researching different countries or their family ancestry will find this site useful. Share the sounds and lyrics on your interactive whiteboard or projector during a world cultures unit on the specific countries.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Asian Art Museum Educator Resources - Asian Art Museum

Grades
5 to 12
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Find a large selection of resources for teaching and learning about Asian art at this resource provided by the Asian Art Museum. Choose from over 100 lessons and activities aligned...more
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Find a large selection of resources for teaching and learning about Asian art at this resource provided by the Asian Art Museum. Choose from over 100 lessons and activities aligned to Common Core Standards. View almost 300 pieces of art and watch over 400 videos presented in an easy-to-use format. Search by keyword or type of resource (In the Spotlight, Most Popular, or What's New). If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): art history (70), artists (74), asia (73), china (66), chinese new year (3), cross cultural understanding (115), japan (61), korea (15)

In the Classroom

Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard (or projector). Allow students to explore on their own or in collaborative groups. Have students or groups collect ideas and findings using Padlet, reviewed here. The Padlet application creates free online sticky note boards. Bookmark and use this site to find resources for Chinese New Year activities. Have students create online posters individually or together as a class using a tool such as Web Poster Wizard, reviewed here, or PicLits, reviewed here.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Stuff You Missed in History Class - Tracy Wilson and Holly Frey

Grades
7 to 12
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Explore interesting history tidbits and background information about world events including topics from Atlantis to Vikings. Scroll through the list of topics and find links to various...more
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Explore interesting history tidbits and background information about world events including topics from Atlantis to Vikings. Scroll through the list of topics and find links to various podcast episodes with archives going back to 2008. Click to play the episodes or download any episode in mp3 format using the download link. Episodes are approximately 30 minutes in length. You can also search for specific topics using the search tool.
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tag(s): archeology (32), black history (59), civil rights (117), civil war (145), cross cultural understanding (115), mental health (26), native americans (78), podcasts (52), religions (61), vikings (10), world war 1 (54), world war 2 (142)

In the Classroom

Use podcasts from Stuff You Missed in History to enrich current lessons or lure students into thinking history can actually be "cool." Provide a link on class computers or your class website for students use. Have students use a mapping tool such as Mapskip (reviewed here) to create a map of one of these events (with audio stories and pictures included)! Have students use Fakebook (reviewed here) to create a "fake" page similar in style to Facebook about one of the people in these lesser known historic events.

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A Moment in Time - New York Times

Grades
6 to 12
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What just happened here? The New York Times offers hundreds of user-submitted photographs from all over the world, each capturing "a moment in time" on a Sunday in May, 2010. ...more
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What just happened here? The New York Times offers hundreds of user-submitted photographs from all over the world, each capturing "a moment in time" on a Sunday in May, 2010. Search by theme, and then give the virtual globe a spin to select a location from which to view your moment in time. Repeat. You won't want to stop. See the world in images from all over the world, all on the same day.

tag(s): creative writing (166), cross cultural understanding (115), debate (41), expository writing (44)

In the Classroom

Each of the "moment in time" photographs provides a wonderful thinking/writing/discussion prompt. What Just Happened Here? If it happened somewhere far away from me, how is it different from what happens in my backyard? What do I have in common with what is pictured? What don't I understand? Use this site to generate ideas for writing, for art, for debate. Use this as an avenue to open discussion about different cultures. Imagine a "moment in time" from another date, such as June 6, 1944, Sept 11, 2001, or an ordinary day in 2014. Challenge students to imagine and create their own moments in time to share.
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OECD Better Life Index - OECD Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development

Grades
8 to 12
3 Favorites 0  Comments
Explore statistics and data about what it takes to be happy in different locations. If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you have the best life? Of ...more
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Explore statistics and data about what it takes to be happy in different locations. If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you have the best life? Of course, it all depends on what you think contributes to a better life. The OECD presents the opportunity to choose from among 11 indices related to happiness. Rank them in order of importance to you, and then see graphically which countries in the world have the best quality of life based on those considerations. Want to have a high income? Then the United States ranks first in that category. Is the cost and quality of available housing what matters? Norway ranks first in that category. Other indices include Environment, Education, Safety, Work-Life Balance, Health, and Jobs. A slider bar on each index allows you to select your priorities and then watch as the countries realign themselves according to your preferences.

tag(s): communities (35), cross cultural understanding (115), environment (317), politics (99), safety (89)

In the Classroom

A great classroom discussion starter, and perfect for displaying on an interactive whiteboard, the Better Life Index allows students to consider and debate what makes for a "better life." And once (or if) they can reach a consensus on those factors, where could that life be found in the world? Of course, once you discover that people are healthiest, for example, in Australia, what does that mean? Why are they healthy there? What community, government, and institutional factors make Australia healthy? Do they make choices other countries don't? This is a wonderful tool for guiding discussion about the public policy decisions made by citizens and governments, and how those decisions affect the quality of life. It would also provide powerful information for persuasive writing or debates. If you talk about utopias and dystopias, this is another way for students to decide what the criteria are for each. If you study world cultures, this site can provide a whole different lens to promote crosscultural understanding. Assign students to compare and contrast factors that matter most to them across multiple countries. Gifted students who are designing an "ideal civilization" can find meaningful data here to use as part of their plans.

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Adventure '14 - Jason Elsom

Grades
K to 12
3 Favorites 1  Comments
Experience a worldwide, virtual, culture exchange in November, 2014. Adventure '14 is an opportunity to work with students from another culture. The only equipment needed is a computer,...more
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Experience a worldwide, virtual, culture exchange in November, 2014. Adventure '14 is an opportunity to work with students from another culture. The only equipment needed is a computer, webcam, reasonable Internet connection, and a projector. Signing up indicates an interest, not a commitment. Sign up requirements: contact information about the school or group, age range, and website address. Also, indicate if there is an interest in pairing up with others by subject, language, or interests. Although there are places to fill in Twitter account information, having a Twitter account is not required. Get to know about people in another culture, embrace the opportunity to work together on a global project, and create a website together (optional).

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105)

In the Classroom

Consider the many ways your class could collaborate. Science students can collaborate on labs, history students on research, and math students can solve some of the world's most difficult equations together. ESL/ELL students might collaborate with students who want to know about their experiences where one does not speak the language.

Partner teachers can choose a collaborative platform students can use to brainstorm ideas they have about the other country and culture before they meet. Use a projector and Lino, reviewed here, (no membership required) to discuss and informally assess prior knowledge about the culture with whom they will be working. Once the project is underway, go back to Lino occasionally, and add what they learned and whether it coincides with the students' original ideas. Ask the partner class if they will fill in the areas and ideas missed on your Lino. Also, consider asking the partner school to blog together. It is amazing the improvement you will see in student writing when they know they have an authentic audience! If you never blogged before, you might want to check out TeachersFirst Blog Basics for the Classroom. Use the blogs as a way to discuss topics related to both culture AND your curriculum: environmental topics, different types of government, or simply day to day life.

Comments

I intend to use this. It sounds like a great idea. , MD, Grades: 1 - 1

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The Places We Live - Jonas Bendikson

Grades
6 to 12
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Visit four of the world's poorest slums through this powerful collection of stories, images, and sounds. Following the introduction, choose a city: Caracas, Venezuela, Nairobi, Kenya,...more
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Visit four of the world's poorest slums through this powerful collection of stories, images, and sounds. Following the introduction, choose a city: Caracas, Venezuela, Nairobi, Kenya, Jakarta, Indonesia, or Mumbai, India. Hear each family's story by choosing from images at the top of each page or view the slideshow including images, audio, and facts about the region.

tag(s): africa (180), cross cultural understanding (115), india (36)

In the Classroom

Be sure to include The Places We Live with any unit on poverty around the world or in a general world cultures class. Share this site on your class web page for students to access both in and outside of class for further exploration. Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here. Have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as Wordle (reviewed here). Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here) to compare life in your area to the life of teens shown here. Share the images, with no sound, as writing prompts for students to imagine themselves in the slums. What would their lives be like? What would be the same or different? What could they do to help their family to get out of those living conditions? Is there anything anyone can do to help?
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Seminole Tribune - Seminole Tribune of Florida

Grades
4 to 12
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Published monthly, The Seminole Tribune of Florida is the official newspaper of the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Current issues and archives are available via PDF download. Click...more
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Published monthly, The Seminole Tribune of Florida is the official newspaper of the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Current issues and archives are available via PDF download. Click on the appropriate tab on the left. You can also read the history of the tribe and view a timeline. The cultural information includes art, basketry, beadwork, housing, clans, language, legends, green corn dance, food and recipes, and clothing. Read an explanation about the current government within the tribe. Florida Seminole Tourism offers information for events and places to visit. Note: You do not need to subscribe to use this site. Simply click to view Current Issue or Archives.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): civil rights (117), cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105), myths and legends (25), native americans (78)

In the Classroom

Use this site to study the Seminoles as part of a unit on Native Americans. Have students compare and contrast to the Native Americans within your own state or region. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here). Use this as a resource when discussing civil rights. In language arts class, use it to explore legends.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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CurriConnects Book List: Childhood Here and There - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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This CurriConnects collection of books shares tales of childhood in many cultures and countries. Find books that help you realize that what is "typical" for the kids at your school...more
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This CurriConnects collection of books shares tales of childhood in many cultures and countries. Find books that help you realize that what is "typical" for the kids at your school may seem odd to those who grew up somewhere else. Discover what was typical for our grandparents is not the same as what is typical today. This collection includes tales of growing up in many circumstances, books to make you stop and wonder what "typical childhood" means. CurriConnects thematic book lists include ISBN numbers for ordering or searching, interest grade levels, ESL levels and Lexiles'® (where available) to match student independent reading levels to challenge, not frustrate. For more on text complexity and Lexiles'®, see this information from the Lexile Framework. Don't miss other CurriConnects themes being added regularly. If your library does not have the books, try interlibrary loan!

tag(s): book lists (128), cross cultural understanding (115), independent reading (128)

In the Classroom

Include these books for independent reading during a unit on world cultures, in a guidance class about differences, or in a reading unit about drawing inferences. Spark discussions about what we assume is "normal" and what we should realize about our own upbringing. The conversations will easily evolve into projects where students can compare and contrast or create "profiles" of childhood in different places and cultures.

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