TeachersFirst's Gifted in any Classroom: Project Tools for Infographics and Timelines

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Start • Helpful Background • Differentiating Academic Content • Respecting Creativity• Personalized Connections • Organization for a Sane Classroom

This group of editors' choice tools will challenge gifted students working on independent and creative projects to show what they know in all grade levels and subjects.

These tools let students create infographics (with numerical data or information) and timelines. Some allow you to get started without making an account while others require a log in right away. Consider using a teacher or class account, especially with younger students. Since some of these tools have a steeper learning curve, it would be a good idea to let students use the same tool several times to move past the glitz and master the content they are trying to communicate.

Before you start choosing tools, Check out the tips, permission slips, and rubrics for Injecting and Respecting Creativity, and be sure you encourage your gifted students to collect ideas in an idea bin as they begin their project.

The "In the Classroom" portion of these tool reviews will suggest some possible project types for your gifted students.

Can't find one you like? Find many more in the TeachersFirst Edge.

 

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MyHistro Interactive Timelines - Jaanus Vihand

Grades
3 to 12
8 Favorites 1  Comments
 
Create interactive timelines of geographically-located events on Google Maps and share them on the web for free. Hover over events on the Google map (or use Google Earth) to enlarge...more
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Create interactive timelines of geographically-located events on Google Maps and share them on the web for free. Hover over events on the Google map (or use Google Earth) to enlarge and view a summary of relevant information. Click play to scroll through events in chronological order. Create your own or browse many of the timelines on the site. No registration is necessary to view timelines already created by others. Sign up with an email account to create or comment on timelines. Create a new timeline, including a title, select a category, and add as many stops on the timeline as you wish. Share using Facebook, Twitter or an RSS feed. Click "embed/share" to copy a url to share with others or an embed code to use in a blog, wiki, or other site. Choose from three privacy level settings to customize viewing options. Be aware: the comments are not moderated, so please preview.

tag(s): timelines (62)

In the Classroom

Consider creating a class account with a single login and password. Ask students to initial their timelines as well to indicate ownership. There are many ways to include this in class. Every topic in history, literature, sciences, and the arts has dates and recorded events. Use your interactive whiteboard or projector to learn about the history of the Olympics, famous people, events, literature, and more. Have students create timelines to share research projects. Use the timeline as a visual tool to discuss events in literary works or the life of a scientist, political figure, or pop artist. Create animal life cycles mapped to their habitat, author or presidential biographies, or even timelines of the events and causes leading to a war. Make a timeline using local, national, or international current events. Elementary students could even interview grandparents and create a class timeline about their grandparents' generation for Grandparents' Day. For collaboration, link up with another classroom in another town (or another country) to build a timeline that shares events in each local area so students can see what was happening at the same time in another location (maybe in the opposite hemisphere: compare weather and seasons!) Students can use the timeline as a visual aid during presentations. Student groups can work on different aspects of the same time period to share with the rest of the class. For example, in studying World War II, one student group can create a timeline of Japanese occupation, another of the German occupation, and so forth. The timelines are perfect to share on your interactive whiteboard or projector as well as on a class wiki.

Challenge your gifted students by having them create mapped timelines of contrasts: The life cycles (and locations) of two migrating species, the events leading to the end of World War II in Europe and the Pacific, the lives of two famous Americans from two different centuries. They could embed the results in a wiki page so other students can view and comment (or ask questions).

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david, TX, Grades: 9 - 12

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Easel.ly

Grades
5 to 12
8 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Create Infographics - easily! Click the "Start Fresh" gray square to begin using the tools. Simply drag and drop your favorite from a wide selection of customizable themes (layouts),...more
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Create Infographics - easily! Click the "Start Fresh" gray square to begin using the tools. Simply drag and drop your favorite from a wide selection of customizable themes (layouts), or start from a blank canvas. Drag and drop other needed elements or upload graphics to create your own. Enter your text and data to create your own Infographic, displaying and sharing information. Find all the needed elements and prompts along the top navigation bar. This site takes the challenge of using design principles out of the creation of an Infographic. Click Save and you will be prompted to join if you have not already. Once logged in and saved, the prompts will tell you to return to your home page (leaving the "creator" area) to choose settings for your finished infographic. You can choose public or private, share by link, download, or delete.

tag(s): data (149), infographics (42), posters (35)

In the Classroom

Use a whole class account if you are working with students under 13 or if school policies prohibit student accounts. Experiment with Easel.ly on a projector or interactive whiteboard (let the students do it!) using different design "themes," making changes without having to configure the whole Infographic. After creating Infographics as a class, review the other types to show basic design principles. Students can create Infographics of a classroom topic, relationships and definitions of major terms, information from labs, and more. Find data and information that connects your content to the outside world, such as the statistics and causes for endangered species. Consider assigning the creation of an Infographic as an assignment to understand any curriculum content and connect it with the real world. For example, show the many ways electricity is used in the world or the impact of slavery on an economy. Or have students explain an experiment and report the results with graphical information to provide meaning. Learn about food groups (now displayed as myplate) by dissecting a food, diary, or a typical school lunch in terms of meeting daily requirements (and other nutrition topics).

If your use literature circles in your classroom, making an Infographic about a novel the group read would be a great conclusion for the lit circle project, and it might entice others in the class to read the novel. Post the infographics on your web page for all your students and their parents to enjoy.

To challenge your gifted students, have them research and create infographics depicting the tough issues or "flipsides" related to your curriculum topic: Major court cases and issues involving freedom of speech (during your Constuitution unit), risks and benefits of nuclear power (in a physics class), how an author's experience influences what he/she writes, lead-ups to a current events crisis, etc.

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Infogr.am - Infogr.am

Grades
5 to 12
8 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Create interactive charts or infographics to embed onto your site and share with others. Choose from one of the themes (a limited choice for free members) and enter your information...more
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Create interactive charts or infographics to embed onto your site and share with others. Choose from one of the themes (a limited choice for free members) and enter your information into the existing words and charts. You can even load data from Excel. Change settings, themes, elements, and more as you work. Your work saves automatically and can be found in your Library. When finished, click Share to publish and send to Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Copy the embed code to place the graphic on your web site, or click "view on web" to copy/paste the URL to share. Note that any infographic you make with a free account is publicly viewable.

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), data (149), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Consider using quantitative data (or collecting your own) to create class graphics explaining and sharing the data. This tool does not create infographics that show flow charts or non-numeric relationships. Use the site to teach data and the graphic display of data. Common Core expects students to interpret data from visual representations and to create their own visual representations of information. Allow groups of students to choose a graphic and report to the class on how the data was made more meaningful using the graphics that were chosen. You may also want to share this link as a research tool for debates or presentations on science or social studies topics. Discuss the science, history, or math behind the data collected. Discuss other information and ways of presenting the information in order to create a more interesting graphic.

To challenge your gifted students, have them research and create infographics depicting the data to support stances on issues related to your curriculum topics: Numbers of people affected by climate change, economic effects of pollution, etc. Have them research the data and present it visually on a class wiki, then write an accompanying explanation or opinion piece.

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Dipity - Underlying, Inc.

Grades
3 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Dipity is an online timeline creator that allows you to create, view, and share timelines in several different ways. When viewing timelines the default mode is the classic timeline...more
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Dipity is an online timeline creator that allows you to create, view, and share timelines in several different ways. When viewing timelines the default mode is the classic timeline display. With just a click the same information can be shown as a flipbook, map, and list. Sharing is simple through widgets that can be embedded on blogs or websites as well as quick links to common networking sites.
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tag(s): timelines (62)

In the Classroom

Click on "add an event" and complete as much information as you can about the event. Types of information that are provided include: title, date, description, picture, link, location, and video Url. If you do not have a complete set of information, the event will still look good in the timeline! Also, please note that you cannot create imaginary locations. The site does verify the place entered as location is a real place.

Use a created, identifiable to the outside world team name to preserve student internet security. This way, students do not need to create their own accounts. Be careful when having students enter locations, if it is historical project, real dates and times are safe to use. However, if students are creating personal type timelines, use general locations like city and country or even just country. You can control who can see the timelines, and who can edit the timeline. Use caution here!

Create a timeline of classroom events throughout the school year. During a unit on inventions, having different students add each invention to the timeline along with pertinent information to create a very visual display of the chronology of the introduction of each item (great for review!). Use for an author study to compare and contrast lives of authors and add historical events to put each author's works into perspective. In science class, have students create a timeline of scientific discoveries or the life of a plant, animal, or scientist. Challenge students to create cross-disciplinary timelines showing historic, scientific, and artistic events during the same time period, such as the Renaissance or a decade during the 20th century, so they can see trends. Make timelines of environmental concerns, such as the Gulf Oil Spill--or a history of environmental disasters. Create timelines for historic events -- local or global. Make family histories in world language classes using vocabulary and grammar skills to describe family members in the new language. Create a class timeline to add to your classroom wiki and have students add information as the year advances so that they can look back on all that they have accomplished.

Need a challenge for your gifted students? as the study history or a scientific discovery, have them make a timeline that shows other events happening in the world at the same time. Have them create a "family tree" for endangered species using this timeline tool. Add pictures, locations, and names of related species and causes for the threat to that animal. Have them map out the steps leading to a war or civil rights event, adding the more subtle causes and people not included in the regular curriculum.

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