TeachersFirst's Resources for Infographics

Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections

This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst includes tools for creating infographics, collections of great infographic examples, and sites with professional information for teachers planning to use infographics for student projects and assessments. Join the 21st century trend of infographics as a way to share a lot of information, quantitative data, and relationships in a compact but effective visual space. Help students learn and construct meaning using infographics.

If you would like to see specific examples of infographics, use the keyword search feature at left to search for more.

 

0-20 of 41    Next

41 Results | sort by:

Less
More

Know More - The Washington Post

Grades
7 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Know More describes itself as "a site for people who like learning stuff." This blog style site offers infographics to intrigue viewers into finding out more. The topics are as ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Know More describes itself as "a site for people who like learning stuff." This blog style site offers infographics to intrigue viewers into finding out more. The topics are as widely varied as immigration, snow fall depth, diseases, or the statistics of Jeopardy's Daily Double! New additions appear daily, so you will never run out of things to "know more" about. Click an infographic, read a quick explanation, and delve deeper via links to the source data and related articles. The subject matter is timely and often parallels topics in today's news.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): infographics (42), writing prompts (88)

In the Classroom

Share this site as a link on your class web page to inspire students in search of a blog topic, a research topic, or current events stories they can "relate to." Share one of the infographics on a projector or interactive whiteboard to give students practice interpreting visual representations of data or to spark discussion about current events. If you assign students to share current events stories, they will love this as a starting point for their investigations. Challenge your gifted students to dig deeper into a topic that fascinates them and share the results as their own infographic using these as a model. Share this site in math classes to make data and statistics more meaningful and to connect to the "real world." Use a Know More infographic as a writing prompt for persuasive writing. Use these visuals to lure students into experience with informational texts by letting them choose one from the widely varied offerings.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Wonkblog: Kurt Vonnegut graphed the world's most popular stories (blog post) - Ana Swanson/Washington Post

Grades
5 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
Read about and see "graphs" of famous stories as sketched by author Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007). This blog post includes an embedded YouTube video of Vonnegut explaining his "graphs"...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Read about and see "graphs" of famous stories as sketched by author Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007). This blog post includes an embedded YouTube video of Vonnegut explaining his "graphs" of classic story "shapes" as well as examples for each. The video is old and grainy, but quite entertaining. Shapes/graphs include "Man in a Hole," "Boy Meets Girl," and even the classic creation story. You need not have read the exact examples he provides to understand -- and start wondering about the "shape" of stories you know. Even younger readers could understand these concepts if you explain them in simplest terms. The graphs, or story shapes, are shown as infographics redrawn by Maya Eilam. You can view the full infographic of the graphs/story shapes as a single image herehere. Some videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): authors (94), creative writing (140), infographics (42), narrative (21), stories and storytelling (22)

In the Classroom

Explore the patterns of story and narratives in our culture and beyond using this visual approach to story mapping. In a high school language arts class, watch the video of Vonnegut explaining story shapes (about 4 minutes) and challenge student partners or groups to think of other examples of that story map, even from movies or television shows. Then turn the class loose to make their own graphic representation of a literary piece you have read recently - or of a movie that is popular right now. If you have an interactive whiteboard, have students direct a student "emcee" to do the drawing as the class gives instructions. With younger students, you may need to talk as a class to be sure students are able to grasp the abstract patterns shown in the graphs, and the video may be too adult level for them to understand without a slower discussion. Once your class (of any level) seems to grasp the idea, post story shapes on your class wiki or web page (with proper credit) so students can add their own examples of tales they have read or watched that fit the pattern. If you give them extra credit for noticing such stories in their own lives, they will internalize the idea of narrative patterns. You could also make a story shape bulletin board where students can add index cards with names of books/tales they read under each pattern. If you are promoting narrative writing, use these story patterns as a way to help students get ideas for where a storyline can go so it has a beginning, middle, and end.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Try the Google Yourself - BackgroundCheck.org

Grades
9 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Take the "Google Yourself" Challenge to find out what others may learn about you by searching the Internet. This infographic provides information on personal online sharing such as...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Take the "Google Yourself" Challenge to find out what others may learn about you by searching the Internet. This infographic provides information on personal online sharing such as the number of people with phone numbers, birth dates, photos, and other information readily available online. Take the challenge and search for your name on Google to find what personal information you have online. Find what others with your name may have online and may get confused with you. Learn also who may be looking you up on search engines and why this is important to know.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): digital citizenship (27), infographics (42), internet safety (101)

In the Classroom

Share this infographic on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) and discuss with students as part of online safety lessons and digital citizenship. Include this site on your class web page for students and parents to access as a reference. Have students complete the challenge as an informative exercise before completing college applications.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Knoema - World Data Atlas - Knoema

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
Just the facts, ma'am. Knoema's World Data Atlas provides a dizzying array of data about the countries of the world. Sort either by country (from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe), or by ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Just the facts, ma'am. Knoema's World Data Atlas provides a dizzying array of data about the countries of the world. Sort either by country (from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe), or by topic (agriculture to water). Look at zoomable, color coded maps, and analyze rankings by topic. The interface is simple and direct, so if you are just looking for a statistic, you will find it quickly and easily. If you are looking at masses of authentic data to analyze or compare, you'll find that too. Click to create comparisons among any 2 to 3 countries. There is an introductory video available, hosted on YouTube. If YouTube is blocked at your school, you may need to view this video at home.

tag(s): atlas (7), data (145), infographics (42), map skills (75), maps (255), natural resources (51), resources (101), united nations (6)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this for student research, whether it be for individual country data or for comparative data by topic. Use the maps on an interactive whiteboard (or projector) to provide a visual representation of the data. This is a great source for authentic data for students to practice their analytic skills, or just to find out what the GDP of Antigua and Barbuda is. This is a resource that will see frequent use. Share it during math units on data, as well, so students have authentic numbers to "play with." Have them write their own data problems and questions for classmates to solve. Challenge your most able student to determine why two countries are so different.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Data Never Sleeps 2.0 - Domo

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
We all know that the Internet is a busy, non-stop source of activity and information. This interesting infographic spells out just how much data is generated each minute as of ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

We all know that the Internet is a busy, non-stop source of activity and information. This interesting infographic spells out just how much data is generated each minute as of April, 2014. Find information such as how many Google searches occur in a minute, how many emails are sent, and the number of Apple app downloads take place every minute. This fascinating infographic provides a wealth of information to help understand the size of the Internet and social networking sites.

tag(s): infographics (42), internet safety (101)

In the Classroom

Display this infographic on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) as part of your Internet safety lessons. Use the code to embed the infographic onto your class website. Use the information as part of a math lesson to extend from one minute to an hour, a day, a week, and so on. Have students look at the 2012 version of the same infographic, found here, and make comparisons. They could do some research for Facebook or one of the other programs to find out how many members there were in 2012 compared to 2014. From there they could come up with the average pieces of data a member generates weekly for that program/site. Share with your colleagues and parents as part of ongoing discussions about student Internet use.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

The Internet in Real-Time - Jeff Thomas Stech

Grades
6 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
Find a captivating, animated infographic that shows how rapidly data generates on the Internet. At the bottom is a changing account of data generation for every 10 seconds. This infographic...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Find a captivating, animated infographic that shows how rapidly data generates on the Internet. At the bottom is a changing account of data generation for every 10 seconds. This infographic is actually live! There is a link at the top where you can click and watch the Internet giants accumulate wealth in real-time.

tag(s): data (145), images (224), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Share both of these infographics on your projector or interactive whiteboard (RIght click to open the wealth accumulation link in another tab). Use these infographics as a discussion starter about Internet safety, media literacy, or in just about how data proliferates in today's world. Discussion starters for the Internet in Real-Time could be about who could take advantage of and use this information, what factors (time of day, holidays, etc.) affect the rate of increase, how do "they" keep track of this? A discussion starter for the one about wealth might be to see how many students know about the controversial 1% of the wealthiest people in America, and then have them research how many of the 1% own or have invested in these companies? In a math class about data, use this as an example of how people draw meaning from numbers.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Visme - Hindsight Ineractive

Grades
7 to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
 
This free tool replaces PowerPoint and Flash to create powerful presentations, banners, Infographics, and more! The projects are viewable on any mobile or computer browser, including...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This free tool replaces PowerPoint and Flash to create powerful presentations, banners, Infographics, and more! The projects are viewable on any mobile or computer browser, including iOS. This tool is very simple to use and not as complicated as many other tools currently available. Choose your type of creation and then a specific template theme. The Navigation area is along the left side. Customize the various tools by clicking on an item in the Navigation such as Canvas, Slides, etc. The Stage area is found to the right of the Navigation, and various tools, grids, and texts appear above the Stage. Drag and drop items into the Stage and even include vector images. Presenter also includes a free image library and also allows searching Flickr Creative Commons from within the tool. Once placed in the stage, style images the way you want, including animation! Products created by this tool play on any browser or device or can be embedded in a web page or blog. Free accounts allow only three projects.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): images (224), infographics (42), multimedia (37)

In the Classroom

Use to create educational slideshows and Infographics to introduce and interest students in a topic of study. Use to generate questions prior to the discussion of topics. Create a multi-image slideshow where students brainstorm how the images are all connected. Have students create projects for class using this easy to use tool. Be sure to include this tool on your blog, wiki, or public page for easy student access. You may want to consider allowing your older students to create their own accounts, depending on school policies. Read tips for safely managing email registrations here. Create a project site for students to upload images and videos found when studying any subject. Find images with various shapes when discussing geometry or shapes in nature. Find pictures of plants or animals for a science unit, etc. World language students can create digital photo stories to narrate using new vocabulary. Present teacher professional development or an end of year display for the school media center.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

The Complete History of Social Media - visual.ly

Grades
6 to 12
3 Favorites 0  Comments
Travel back in history to three different time periods to show how today's social media has developed. The first period from BC to the 1800's includes the old-fashioned dial phone ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Travel back in history to three different time periods to show how today's social media has developed. The first period from BC to the 1800's includes the old-fashioned dial phone and an antique radio. It features the use of "snail" mail. The second period, the 1900's, goes from 1966 with the introduction of the use of email through Usenet and listserves to the beginnings of modern social networks including Napster. For the years 2000 - 2013 roll your cursor over the date and see how each new social network exhibited has more sophisticated use of technology and wider appeal.

tag(s): infographics (42), social networking (102)

In the Classroom

Consider having students make online posters comparing modern types of social media such as Instagram and Pheed using an online poster creator, such as Check This (reviewed here). Have groups of students imagine a new type of social media and give prizes to the group who has the most comprehensive and creative project. Have students create an infographic themselves showing the features of their new network using Easel.ly, reviewed here or Venngage reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

JPL Infographics - Jet Propulsion Laboratory of NASA

Grades
9 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Discover great Infographics from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Use this tool to create your own Infographics or upload ones already created. Easy directions are provided. Grab data...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Discover great Infographics from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Use this tool to create your own Infographics or upload ones already created. Easy directions are provided. Grab data from NASA to create your Infographic. Downloadable data includes images, data sets, and more. Share using social media. Be sure to view the gallery for very interesting uses of the data. You can download full resolution pdf files of the infographics (large files).

tag(s): infographics (42), nasa (39), space (175)

In the Classroom

Use Infographics from the gallery to begin a new unit or lesson. Share the infographics on your projector or interactive whiteboard. Annotate them on the whiteboard to "dig deeply" into the information. Engage students in brainstorming, critical thinking, or asking questions. Create Infographics to share with others by choosing relevant information from the NASA archives. Connect information learned in class to real world space information. Use this information as part of a project to report upon an aspect of space.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Zidbits - Zidbits media

Grades
3 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
This tool is cool little tidbits of knowledge. The subtitle is "Boldly Exploring Life's Little Mysteries." Zidbits include facts such as "What is the hardest language to learn?" "Do...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This tool is cool little tidbits of knowledge. The subtitle is "Boldly Exploring Life's Little Mysteries." Zidbits include facts such as "What is the hardest language to learn?" "Do trees die from old age?" or "What is the most lethal poison?" Find facts for history, science, health, entertainment, and news on this site as well as fun facts. This site doesn't provide just a quick tidbit, but also gives background information and additional details.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): infographics (42), questioning (32), speaking (19)

In the Classroom

This resource is useful to hook your students at the beginning of your lessons or simply to get them reading non-fiction text. Use these as hooks to get your students thinking about content that will be introduced in the lesson. Students can find a Zidbit they are interested in. Poll students about possible answers and then report the actual answer and content needed in order to understand and explain it. Learn a new Zidbit yourself every week. If you teach public speaking skills, have students use these stories as inspiration or "hooks" for informational speeches, as well.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Infographics Only - Infographics Only

Grades
3 to 12
4 Favorites 0  Comments
Find a colorful, creative Infographic for just about any topic on this sharing site. Use one of the forty-plus categories or type your keyword in a search box. There are ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Find a colorful, creative Infographic for just about any topic on this sharing site. Use one of the forty-plus categories or type your keyword in a search box. There are so many cool Infographics at this site that you won't have to create one of your own. But if you do, you can upload it and have it displayed on Infographics Only. What is an Infographic? Learn more about Infographics here. Be sure to take time to preview the Infographics on this site as some may not be suitable for young people. It would be best to link directly to the Infographic you want to share.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): charts and graphs (188), data (145), graphic design (29), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Common Core emphasizes "reading" of visual sources of information, and this is the perfect source. Why not use an Infographic as an introduction to a unit or lesson in your classroom? Create open ended questions about the Infographic to use as a formative assessment tool. Ask students to create questions about the topic of the Infographic. Reading teachers could choose an Infographic on a daily/weekly basis for teaching/practicing how to interpret informational graphics within a text. If they are mature enough to ignore some topics, consider having students go to the Just for Fun category and choose an Infographic. Then ask students to report out the "main idea" of the graphic and give three supporting details as evidence. For any subject, as a form of summative evaluation, consider assigning students to create an Infographic about a topic covered in class as a way to show understanding. If your students are new to creating infographics, have them view Creating Infographics: A Screencast Tutorial reviewed here. For more examples of how to use infographics in your classroom, view the recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session found here. This session is 75 minutes in length.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Manners Matter Infographic - KnowTheNet.org

Grades
4 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Manners Matter offers a highly detailed infographic detailing proper Internet etiquette and digital citizenship. Find Do's and Dont's of Online Behavior. Use the embed code provided...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Manners Matter offers a highly detailed infographic detailing proper Internet etiquette and digital citizenship. Find Do's and Dont's of Online Behavior. Use the embed code provided to easily embed and share this infographic on your class website or blog.

tag(s): digital citizenship (27), infographics (42), internet safety (101)

In the Classroom

Use this infographic as the core of a unit on digital citizenship or as a reference poster in your classroom. Share this infographic during the first week of school as you go over Internet behavior expectations. Share on your interactive whiteboard for students to explore and explain. Have groups investigate and elaborate on one area of the poster then share with the class. Print the poster using a tool like blockposter reviewed here. Challenge cooperative learning groups to create videos about proper Internet behavior and share them on a site such as TeacherTube reviewed here. Share this graphic with parents so you can work together.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

OK2Ask®:Now I See! April 2013 - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from April 9, 2013, opens in Adobe Connect. Infographics are an excellent tool for students to understand and connect...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from April 9, 2013, opens in Adobe Connect. Infographics are an excellent tool for students to understand and connect vocabulary, data, and other information. Discover ways for students to use infographics to learn and to "show what they know." Hear how one teacher implemented infographics as the scaffold for learning. Discover helpful tools, how-to strategies, and practical tips for using student-created infographics in middle school or high school classes. (Ideas are adaptable for elementary). As a result of this session and through individual follow-up, teachers will: List possible ways to incorporate infographics in your curriculum; Chat with a teacher who has used infographics and learn from her experiences; View examples of student-made infographics and hear students' thoughts about learning through infographics; Discuss how to get started with infographics, even if you are NOT a visual person!; Explore a sampling of resources, materials, and web-based tools appropriate for student-created infographics in many subjects/grade levels; Locate at least one appropriate web resource/tool for use in your curriculum/teaching situation; (follow-up) Implement lesson(s) using infographics as scaffold or assessment (or both).

tag(s): infographics (42)

In the Classroom

View this recording to learn more about infographics and how to use them in your classroom. Reach your more visual learners using infographics. Visit the resource page to view all of the links shared. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Infographic of the Day - Fast Company

Grades
6 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
The Infographic of the Day from FastCompany can give practice in learning about data and interpreting Infographics. Not sure what an Infographic is? Infographics provide visual...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

The Infographic of the Day from FastCompany can give practice in learning about data and interpreting Infographics. Not sure what an Infographic is? Infographics provide visual data and information about a topic/related topics. Be sure to take time to preview the Infographics on this site as some may not be suitable for young people. It would be best to link directly to a specific Infographic to share.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): data (145), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Instruct students to view the Infographic and identify the information that jumps out at them. This is a good time to discuss design elements and how to arrange items to be noticed. Allow students to work in groups to identify interesting information. Students can identify the accompanying information that helps in the understanding of the data. Students can record any questions the infographic raises about the data or the related information. Challenge your students to use specific information they find to develop their own Infographic with further explanations and concepts. This last activity meets Common Core standards in paraphrasing content into simpler terms and synthesizing information from multiple sources into a coherent understanding. Learn more about Infographics here. Peruse TeachersFirst's many Infographics tools here.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

The Noun Project - The Noun Project

Grades
K to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Find free, scalable vector images created by a community of designers whose goal is to create a universal global language of symbols that everyone can understand. Vector files are images...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Find free, scalable vector images created by a community of designers whose goal is to create a universal global language of symbols that everyone can understand. Vector files are images that do not change or become fuzzy when you resize them. Communicating visually is powerful and easy using symbols like these. Move beyond language and cultural barriers in learning and communicating by using these symbols. You must set up a free account to actually download. Note: Many programs cannot use the file format (SVG) but some programs, such as Adobe Illustrator, can. Don't have a program to open the image? Download the image, then upload to the Media Converter (reviewed here) to convert the image. No need to open the file- just convert! Note that the use of these vector images is FREE if the artist(s) attribution is easily viewable and accessible (linked back to the artist's page on the Noun Project site). Many images are in the public domain with no attribution required. Ethical use would still give credit. If you do not want to attribute each time it is used, icons can be purchased for unlimited use instead. Be patient. This site is often SLOW to open and offers slow downloads because of the larger image files.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): digital storytelling (94), graphic design (29), images (224), infographics (42), stories and storytelling (22)

In the Classroom

The symbols are useful for autistic support, emotional support, ESL/ELL, and even in world languages. Use these vector diagrams for creating infographics and pictograms in any content area. Use a site such as Easel.ly, reviewed here or Venngage reviewed here. Challenge students to tell a rebus-style story using simple symbols only. This is a fun and imaginative way for students to think creatively. Use these symbols to create classroom signs. Teach students digital citizenship along with creativity by learning to give credit for resources used as they explain. Try using icons like these in the navigation area of a wiki or class website instead of words to increase the accessibility to others. Be sure to include this site as a list of resources for students to use on your wiki or class website. Students can access images to tell their story or to relate/teach content to others. Encourage students to create their own symbols for use in telling a story (great if students have access to programs that can create vector images). Special ed teachers may want to use these symbols on communication boards. Note: since file downloads are slow, you may want to download a collection for your specific lesson or project outside of class time and offer the files to students locally in a shared folder or on a class wiki. Teachers of non-readers will find these symbols useful in making classroom rules or signs.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Creating Infographics: A Screencast Tutorial - School Library Journal Linda Braun

Grades
3 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
  
View this video to learn how to create an infographic. For visual learners, this is a must see! Linda Braun briefly introduces what an infographic is using the program Visual.ly, ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

View this video to learn how to create an infographic. For visual learners, this is a must see! Linda Braun briefly introduces what an infographic is using the program Visual.ly, reviewed here. She then switches over to a program called Easel.ly, reviewed here, where you can use one of their templates to create your infographic. She steps you through changing objects, object size and color, and adding text. Once she finishes the infographic in Easel.ly, she then switches to Infogr.am, reviewed here, and shows how to either use their templates, or create your own, including importing your own data and images.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): infographics (42), video (195)

In the Classroom

Introduce your students to infographics and this video in class. Share this (approximately 14 minute) video on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then, post this video on your website for students to watch whenever they need help while creating an infographic. Consider assigning the creation of an Infographic as an assignment to understand content and connect it with the real world. See a full TeachersFirst article about using infographics as a scaffold and formative assessment here. Have students create an infographic about the impact of slavery on an economy or to explain an experiment and report the results with graphical information to provide meaning. Use one of the tools described in the video, Visual.ly, reviewed here, Easel.ly, reviewed here, or Infogr.am, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Historical Thinking Interactive Poster (Secondary) - National History Education Clearinghouse

Grades
6 to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
  
Learn to think like a historian. See how we know about the past by using this interactive poster. All you have to do is hover your mouse over one of ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Learn to think like a historian. See how we know about the past by using this interactive poster. All you have to do is hover your mouse over one of the quadrants and click. More information, activities, and links will appear. Each of the quadrants also has additional teaching resources. On the far left column you will find links to "What Is Historical Thinking?" a video, "What are Primary Sources?" and "What are Secondary Sources?"

tag(s): civil rights (97), history day (20), infographics (42), primary sources (76)

In the Classroom

Use your projector or interactive whiteboard and teach your students how to think like a historian. There are some interesting links here for you and your students to investigate. For instance, there are links for exploring the modern civil rights movement, primary sources to look at diary entries from other time periods, examining lithographs, using and reading multiple perspectives, and several more. You may want to go through each quadrant with the entire class, or you might want to assign groups to become "specialists" in a quadrant and have them present it to your class. Challenge the groups to create presentations using Prezi (reviewed here).
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Infographic Visual Resumes (A Pinterest Pinboard) - Randy Krum

Grades
6 to 12
9 Favorites 0  Comments
This PInterest pinboard is a collection of infographics that serve as resumes for artists, writers, tech designers, digital workers, and many other 21st century creative professionals....more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This PInterest pinboard is a collection of infographics that serve as resumes for artists, writers, tech designers, digital workers, and many other 21st century creative professionals. Click any infographic to see it in its original home on the web so you can zoom in and see the details. This collection represents strengths of both Pinterest (reviewed here) and the infographic medium. Explore to see how it's done!

tag(s): careers (114), infographics (42), portfolios (20)

In the Classroom

Share this visual collection with students as an example of one way they can portray their strengths and interests to potential employers or college admissions offices. Don't wait until they are seniors, however. Middle school students in an art or career exploration class can create a resume infographic about themselves to use for summer jobs or even on a flyer to get part time work around the neighborhood. Not creative? Allow students to explore the "resumes" to learn more about digital careers and the credentials they require. In high school art classes, have students explore the hot topics in digital design by checking out the resumes. In history or literature classes, offer the infographic resume as a possible project alternative for students for literature study or researching a figure in history. They could create an infographic resume for their figure, literary character, or author. These examples can inspire them.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Easel.ly

Grades
5 to 12
7 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Create Infographics - easily! Click the "Start Fresh" gray square to begin using the tools. Simply drag and drop your favorite from a wide selection of customizable themes (layouts),...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Create Infographics - easily! Click the "Start Fresh" gray square to begin using the tools. Simply drag and drop your favorite from a wide selection of customizable themes (layouts), or start from a blank canvas. Drag and drop other needed elements or upload graphics to create your own. Enter your text and data to create your own Infographic, displaying and sharing information. Find all the needed elements and prompts along the top navigation bar. This site takes the challenge of using design principles out of the creation of an Infographic. Click Save and you will be prompted to join if you have not already. Once logged in and saved, the prompts will tell you to return to your home page (leaving the "creator" area) to choose settings for your finished infographic. You can choose public or private, share by link, download, or delete.

tag(s): data (145), infographics (42), posters (30)

In the Classroom

Use a whole class account if you are working with students under 13 or if school policies prohibit student accounts. Experiment with Easel.ly on a projector or interactive whiteboard (let the students do it!) using different design "themes," making changes without having to configure the whole Infographic. After creating Infographics as a class, review the other types to show basic design principles. Students can create Infographics of a classroom topic, relationships and definitions of major terms, information from labs, and more. Find data and information that connects your content to the outside world, such as the statistics and causes for endangered species. Consider assigning the creation of an Infographic as an assignment to understand any curriculum content and connect it with the real world. For example, show the many ways electricity is used in the world or the impact of slavery on an economy. Or have students explain an experiment and report the results with graphical information to provide meaning. Learn about food groups (now displayed as myplate) by dissecting a food, diary, or a typical school lunch in terms of meeting daily requirements (and other nutrition topics).

If your use literature circles in your classroom, making an Infographic about a novel the group read would be a great conclusion for the lit circle project, and it might entice others in the class to read the novel. Post the infographics on your web page for all your students and their parents to enjoy.

To challenge your gifted students, have them research and create infographics depicting the tough issues or "flipsides" related to your curriculum topic: Major court cases and issues involving freedom of speech (during your Constuitution unit), risks and benefits of nuclear power (in a physics class), how an author's experience influences what he/she writes, lead-ups to a current events crisis, etc.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Now I See! Infographics as content scaffold and creative, formative assessment - TeachersFirst: Candace Hackett Shively and Louise Maine

Grades
6 to 12
7 Favorites 0  Comments
Discover how to use student-created infographics as scaffold or assessment for learning in any middle or high school subject. Many teachers are not "visual" people and struggle to implement...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Discover how to use student-created infographics as scaffold or assessment for learning in any middle or high school subject. Many teachers are not "visual" people and struggle to implement infographics because they do not know how to help students. Whether you are a visual person or a "data" person, these pages will help your class get started. See the story of one teacher's journey into using infographics and learn from her experience. Find downloadable files to help: a PowerPoint you can use with students, and a customizable rubric. Don't miss the extensive Resources and Tools page for examples, background articles, and more. These pages grew out of a presentation at ISTE 2012.

tag(s): infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Read through this professional tutorial if you have even considered trying infographics with your students. You will find just the encouragement you need. Mark this one in your Favorites and share the many examples with your students, including student-created examples from a ninth grade class, as you launch your own infographics projects. Let your students "show what they know" in a new way.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

0-20 of 41    Next