TeachersFirst's Resources for Infographics

Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections

This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst includes tools for creating infographics, collections of great infographic examples, and sites with professional information for teachers planning to use infographics for student projects and assessments. Join the 21st century trend of infographics as a way to share a lot of information, quantitative data, and relationships in a compact but effective visual space. Help students learn and construct meaning using infographics.

If you would like to see specific examples of infographics, use the keyword search feature at left to search for more.

 

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Historical Thinking Interactive Poster (Secondary) - National History Education Clearinghouse

Grades
6 to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
  
Learn to think like a historian. See how we know about the past by using this interactive poster. All you have to do is hover your mouse over one of ...more
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Learn to think like a historian. See how we know about the past by using this interactive poster. All you have to do is hover your mouse over one of the quadrants and click. More information, activities, and links will appear. Each of the quadrants also has additional teaching resources. On the far left column you will find links to "What Is Historical Thinking?" a video, "What are Primary Sources?" and "What are Secondary Sources?"

tag(s): civil rights (117), history day (23), infographics (42), primary sources (86)

In the Classroom

Use your projector or interactive whiteboard and teach your students how to think like a historian. There are some interesting links here for you and your students to investigate. For instance, there are links for exploring the modern civil rights movement, primary sources to look at diary entries from other time periods, examining lithographs, using and reading multiple perspectives, and several more. You may want to go through each quadrant with the entire class, or you might want to assign groups to become "specialists" in a quadrant and have them present it to your class. Challenge the groups to create presentations using Prezi (reviewed here).
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Infographic Visual Resumes (A Pinterest Pinboard) - Randy Krum

Grades
6 to 12
9 Favorites 0  Comments
This PInterest pinboard is a collection of infographics that serve as resumes for artists, writers, tech designers, digital workers, and many other 21st century creative professionals....more
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This PInterest pinboard is a collection of infographics that serve as resumes for artists, writers, tech designers, digital workers, and many other 21st century creative professionals. Click any infographic to see it in its original home on the web so you can zoom in and see the details. This collection represents strengths of both Pinterest (reviewed here) and the infographic medium. Explore to see how it's done!

tag(s): careers (132), infographics (42), portfolios (28)

In the Classroom

Share this visual collection with students as an example of one way they can portray their strengths and interests to potential employers or college admissions offices. Don't wait until they are seniors, however. Middle school students in an art or career exploration class can create a resume infographic about themselves to use for summer jobs or even on a flyer to get part time work around the neighborhood. Not creative? Allow students to explore the "resumes" to learn more about digital careers and the credentials they require. In high school art classes, have students explore the hot topics in digital design by checking out the resumes. In history or literature classes, offer the infographic resume as a possible project alternative for students for literature study or researching a figure in history. They could create an infographic resume for their figure, literary character, or author. These examples can inspire them.

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Easel.ly

Grades
5 to 12
8 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Create Infographics - easily! Click the "Start Fresh" gray square to begin using the tools. Simply drag and drop your favorite from a wide selection of customizable themes (layouts),...more
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Create Infographics - easily! Click the "Start Fresh" gray square to begin using the tools. Simply drag and drop your favorite from a wide selection of customizable themes (layouts), or start from a blank canvas. Drag and drop other needed elements or upload graphics to create your own. Enter your text and data to create your own Infographic, displaying and sharing information. Find all the needed elements and prompts along the top navigation bar. This site takes the challenge of using design principles out of the creation of an Infographic. Click Save and you will be prompted to join if you have not already. Once logged in and saved, the prompts will tell you to return to your home page (leaving the "creator" area) to choose settings for your finished infographic. You can choose public or private, share by link, download, or delete.

tag(s): data (148), infographics (42), posters (36)

In the Classroom

Use a whole class account if you are working with students under 13 or if school policies prohibit student accounts. Experiment with Easel.ly on a projector or interactive whiteboard (let the students do it!) using different design "themes," making changes without having to configure the whole Infographic. After creating Infographics as a class, review the other types to show basic design principles. Students can create Infographics of a classroom topic, relationships and definitions of major terms, information from labs, and more. Find data and information that connects your content to the outside world, such as the statistics and causes for endangered species. Consider assigning the creation of an Infographic as an assignment to understand any curriculum content and connect it with the real world. For example, show the many ways electricity is used in the world or the impact of slavery on an economy. Or have students explain an experiment and report the results with graphical information to provide meaning. Learn about food groups (now displayed as myplate) by dissecting a food, diary, or a typical school lunch in terms of meeting daily requirements (and other nutrition topics).

If your use literature circles in your classroom, making an Infographic about a novel the group read would be a great conclusion for the lit circle project, and it might entice others in the class to read the novel. Post the infographics on your web page for all your students and their parents to enjoy.

To challenge your gifted students, have them research and create infographics depicting the tough issues or "flipsides" related to your curriculum topic: Major court cases and issues involving freedom of speech (during your Constuitution unit), risks and benefits of nuclear power (in a physics class), how an author's experience influences what he/she writes, lead-ups to a current events crisis, etc.

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Now I See! Infographics as content scaffold and creative, formative assessment - TeachersFirst: Candace Hackett Shively and Louise Maine

Grades
6 to 12
7 Favorites 0  Comments
Discover how to use student-created infographics as scaffold or assessment for learning in any middle or high school subject. Many teachers are not "visual" people and struggle to implement...more
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Discover how to use student-created infographics as scaffold or assessment for learning in any middle or high school subject. Many teachers are not "visual" people and struggle to implement infographics because they do not know how to help students. Whether you are a visual person or a "data" person, these pages will help your class get started. See the story of one teacher's journey into using infographics and learn from her experience. Find downloadable files to help: a PowerPoint you can use with students, and a customizable rubric. Don't miss the extensive Resources and Tools page for examples, background articles, and more. These pages grew out of a presentation at ISTE 2012.

tag(s): infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Read through this professional tutorial if you have even considered trying infographics with your students. You will find just the encouragement you need. Mark this one in your Favorites and share the many examples with your students, including student-created examples from a ninth grade class, as you launch your own infographics projects. Let your students "show what they know" in a new way.

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Course hero - Course Hero, Inc.

Grades
5 to 12
4 Favorites 0  Comments
Take note of Course Hero with your class. Course Hero looks at various note-taking methods and explores each (using infographics and more). The featured infographic here shows results...more
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Take note of Course Hero with your class. Course Hero looks at various note-taking methods and explores each (using infographics and more). The featured infographic here shows results on written vs. computer note-taking. Discover different types of note taking and research for each. Find the most effective ways to take notes. Caution: this is a public blog, so you may want to preview comments before allowing students to explore on their own. Or simply share this site together with your class rather than using it for individual exploration.

tag(s): infographics (42), note taking (32)

In the Classroom

Use Course Hero to introduce note taking for your study skills class or integrate into any subject. After introducing each note-taking strategy mentioned, have your students try each type and decide which works best for each individual. Immediately after your first audio lecture, give a pop quiz. Let students try note taking and discover the value for success. Use as a remediation tool for learners who need more reinforcement. Introduce in gifted classes, when these learners can no longer rely on simply remembering. At your parent orientation, give this site as a resource. And be sure to provide this link on your class website.

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Venngage - Venngage

Grades
7 to 12
8 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Like the looks of Infographics but wish it were as easy as creating a Powerpoint? This website aims to empower you to easily create infographics in a short time. It ...more
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Like the looks of Infographics but wish it were as easy as creating a Powerpoint? This website aims to empower you to easily create infographics in a short time. It is worth the free registration to gain access. Create beautiful Infographics by creating a title and then choosing a template or color scheme. Create your own templates using a range of color, label, and font choices. Click on the elements on the template to change the words, add widgets, create charts, and more. Use the slider along the top right to move between edit mode and preview mode. Go beyond traditional charts by including word clouds, treemaps, bubble charts, and more. Click Save as Template (helpful in creating labels and examples for students to follow) to save your style for later. Click Publish to make the Infographic public or private. You can save the Infographic as an image, share via URL, or use an embed code to place on a wiki, site, or blog. Click on your dashboard to view additional templates shared by creators and to find your Infographics.

tag(s): data (148), infographics (42), posters (36), vocabulary (323)

In the Classroom

Consider creating Infographics of material learned in class and for better understanding and connection with other topics and the "real world." Make curriculum content more real with infographics that students can relate to. Have students create their own infographics with this site to display what they have learned from a unit of study, how vocabulary words are related to the unit content, or as a review before a test. It could even be a replacement for the test! Connect data found on the Internet to information needed to understand that data. (Consider looking at different ways to show the data which can generate bias.) Use your interactive whiteboard or projector to allow student groups to present an Infographic about a book they've read, related news article, etc. Create Infographics about events such as Earth Day, D-Day, Take Your Child to Work Day, and other observances.

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Infogr.am - Infogr.am

Grades
5 to 12
8 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Create interactive charts or infographics to embed onto your site and share with others. Choose from one of the themes (a limited choice for free members) and enter your information...more
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Create interactive charts or infographics to embed onto your site and share with others. Choose from one of the themes (a limited choice for free members) and enter your information into the existing words and charts. You can even load data from Excel. Change settings, themes, elements, and more as you work. Your work saves automatically and can be found in your Library. When finished, click Share to publish and send to Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest. Copy the embed code to place the graphic on your web site, or click "view on web" to copy/paste the URL to share. Note that any infographic you make with a free account is publicly viewable.

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), data (148), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Consider using quantitative data (or collecting your own) to create class graphics explaining and sharing the data. This tool does not create infographics that show flow charts or non-numeric relationships. Use the site to teach data and the graphic display of data. Common Core expects students to interpret data from visual representations and to create their own visual representations of information. Allow groups of students to choose a graphic and report to the class on how the data was made more meaningful using the graphics that were chosen. You may also want to share this link as a research tool for debates or presentations on science or social studies topics. Discuss the science, history, or math behind the data collected. Discuss other information and ways of presenting the information in order to create a more interesting graphic.

To challenge your gifted students, have them research and create infographics depicting the data to support stances on issues related to your curriculum topics: Numbers of people affected by climate change, economic effects of pollution, etc. Have them research the data and present it visually on a class wiki, then write an accompanying explanation or opinion piece.

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Piktochart - Ai Ching and Andrea Zaggia

Grades
9 to 12
5 Favorites 0  Comments
 
If a picture is worth a thousand words, then use images in an Infographic to tell those words in a captivating way. Fill in the information about your presentation and ...more
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If a picture is worth a thousand words, then use images in an Infographic to tell those words in a captivating way. Fill in the information about your presentation and choose a theme. Information will be added to the theme you choose. Add data, change images and icons, and add text. Save as a static image (JPEG or PNG) or in an HTML format to embed in a web page.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): infographics (42)

In the Classroom

You will want to play with this tool before using it in class. For a good explanation of the infographic process using Piktochart, see this blog post. Use this tool anywhere numerical data is collected and is best shown in a chart. Collect data in a science, survey, or math class and display it using different graphs to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using each graph type. Use for quick creation and sharing of created graphs. Create charts together easily on an interactive whiteboard when introducing the different types. Use to portray different sets of data about a topic in a new and unique way.

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Seeing the Future! A Guide to Visual Communication - HOWTOONS and the Lemelson/MIT InvenTeams

Grades
6 to 12
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This comic-book style guide traces the history of visual communications and explains design principles anyone can use to create visual projects. You can click to view in html (web page)...more
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This comic-book style guide traces the history of visual communications and explains design principles anyone can use to create visual projects. You can click to view in html (web page) form or download the pdf version. The comic book follows the tale of a young man who cannot draw but wants to revolutionize the world. By breaking drawing into simple shapes and lines, the protagonist learns to communicate through drawing. Then he adds perspective to move past "flat" to the look of 3D. Whether you are trying to create a poster, an infographic, a scientific diagram, or a greeting card, this guide will give you new "perspective."

tag(s): graphic design (35), infographics (42), visual thinking (10)

In the Classroom

Share this guide (the html version) on your interactive whiteboard or projector before any visual project or assignment. Offer the pdf and/or the link as a reference on your class web page or computer cluster for students who become frustrated drawing. The tools explained in the guide are easily duplicated in most computer drawing programs and online whiteboard tools, such as these reviewed tools from the TeachersFirst Edge. Encourage students to view this guide when they must design a model or infographic and cannot figure out how to simplify their ideas to something they can represent.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Infographic of Infographics - Ivan Cash

Grades
6 to 12
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This infographic depicts the trends and design strategies used to convey information in today's infographics. See stats on the visual devices used, topics, locations, and informational...more
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This infographic depicts the trends and design strategies used to convey information in today's infographics. See stats on the visual devices used, topics, locations, and informational elements that are "trending" in infographic use. Whether you are an analytic person or a visual one, this site make you stop and think.

tag(s): graphic design (35), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

If you are assigning students to create infographics, this is a must-share. Have students explore this in small groups then find examples of the trend they find most interesting. Share their finds on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Better yet, share them on your class wiki so students can refer back to these ideas when they are "stuck" working on their own visual products. Art teachers can use this as an entry point into a graphic design unit. Reading teachers can use this to help students interpret and analyze the graphics that often accompany informational texts.

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Charts Bin - Chartsbin.com

Grades
9 to 12
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Find great Infographics about a variety of topics. Use the beautiful arrangement of data to uncover relationships between various pieces of information. Easily share or embed the chart...more
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Find great Infographics about a variety of topics. Use the beautiful arrangement of data to uncover relationships between various pieces of information. Easily share or embed the chart where needed. Click on References and Data Table to look at the raw data and origins of the information. Choose from major topics in the tabs above such as Country Information, Environment, Food and Agriculture, and more. Search your own topics with the search bar.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): business (58), charts and graphs (195), data (148), infographics (42), maps (287)

In the Classroom

Introduce a topic by sharing the Infographic and allowing time for students to identify various items that they notice about the chart. Allow time to think-pair-share in class and list questions for further understanding. Consider creating Infographics of material learned in class and for better understanding and connection with other topics and the world around them. Make curriculum content more real with infographics that students can relate to.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Show(R) USA - SHOW(R)

Grades
6 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
See a new way to look at the USA (or the World, or Japan). This site resizes countries on the map in relation to various issues: population, resources, employment, religion, ...more
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See a new way to look at the USA (or the World, or Japan). This site resizes countries on the map in relation to various issues: population, resources, employment, religion, death, business, the environment, and more. Each main topic also has numerous sub-topics to explore. Maps adjust to correspond to data. For example, click on "unemployed" on the U.S. map and you see the states in proportion to the number of unemployed workers. Mouse over the state and you can see the percentage of unemployed workers. A list on the right ranks states from 1 to 50 for the percentage of unemployed (or other specified topic). New maps/topics are constantly being added, and you can make suggestions as to what types of maps you would like to see.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): agriculture (55), elections (75), energy (198), environment (317), infographics (42), maps (287), politics (99), population (60), religions (61), resources (112), sports (97)

In the Classroom

When studying a specific topic in class (unemployment, AIDS, drunk driving, religion, energy resources, crops, etc.), share this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Ask students why certain state or countries might differ from others. Are there issues that appear to be related, such as alcoholism and unemployment? Is it cause/effect or simply a coincidence? During election years, explore political leanings/polls and other statistics from this site. Have cooperative learning groups explore a specific topic (or state) and possible reasons for the data. To show what they have learned from this site, challenge groups to create an online graphic to share using Tabblo reviewed here. Have students make a multimedia presentation using one of the many TeachersFirst Edge tools reviewed here. Remember that you can always take screenshots of a map using PrtScrn key in Windows (then paste it where you want it) or using Command+Shift+4 on a Mac to save the image on your computer. Use the screenshots in explanations and presentations.
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GE Data Visualization - General Electric

Grades
7 to 12
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View data visualizations (infographics) about GE's initiatives. Click or rollover each interactive graph and review the data that can be found within it. Share these data visualizations...more
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View data visualizations (infographics) about GE's initiatives. Click or rollover each interactive graph and review the data that can be found within it. Share these data visualizations by email, twitter, or Facebook, as well as downloading each for further use. The topics range from energy use to health issues to innovation. Don't miss the retrospective of the year 2011 shown through data visualizations!
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), data (148), energy (198), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Use for basic information about energy and economic issues that can be discussed in class and researched even further. Share the graphs and information on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Challenge cooperative learning groups to explore different graphs and report back to the class. Use this site to inspire infographic projects in any social studies or science class.
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Infographics archive - Infographics Archive

Grades
7 to 12
4 Favorites 0  Comments
Find fascinating Infographics on a variety of topics: Technology, Environment, Business, Food Facts, Politics, Health Safety, and even Interesting Facts. What are Infographics? A graphic...more
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Find fascinating Infographics on a variety of topics: Technology, Environment, Business, Food Facts, Politics, Health Safety, and even Interesting Facts. What are Infographics? A graphic visual representation of information, data, or knowledge.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), data (148), graphic design (35), infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Use as an introduction to a lesson or unit. Use Think-Pair-Share to list and share information provided by the graphic. Develop questions to be answered to understand the information or questions that they just wonder. Allow students or groups of students to choose an Infographic that interests them and report on the information given. Consider assigning the creation of an Infographic as an assignment to understand content and connect it with the real world, such as showing the many ways electricity is used in the world or the impact of slavery on an economy. Or have them explain an experiment and report the results with graphical information to provide meaning. Since infographics are often key to understanding an article, reading teachers will appreciate this large collection to use in teaching/practicing how to interpret informational graphics within a text. Share one each day for students to practice telling you the "main idea" of the graphic.

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Colours in Cultures - Information is Beautiful: David McCandless

Grades
6 to 12
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This circular infographic shows colors connected with 85 specific emotions in a variety of cultures. What emotions do colors suggest in a culture? How does culture convey emotion through...more
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This circular infographic shows colors connected with 85 specific emotions in a variety of cultures. What emotions do colors suggest in a culture? How does culture convey emotion through color, and how does this vary from culture to culture? You can see examples of other similarly designed visualizations by clicking on "Select Visualization."

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), colors (79), cross cultural understanding (115), cultures (105), graphic organizers (43), infographics (42), psychology (64), visualizations (14)

In the Classroom

Use this site to promote visual literacy and as an example for reading graphs. Have students select another topic and make a similar graph of their own. Use one of the graph makers available at the site "Statistics - Johnnie's Math Page" (reviewed here). Look at paintings from different cultures and ask how color interacts with other artistic elements like shape, design, placement, etc. to convey meaning. Have students make an assortment of works of the same design, varying color choice depending on which culture is going to view the work. If you have student creating infographics, this chart is a must in selecting font colors and more to guide emotional impact of the graphics.

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Open Heat Map - Openheatmap.com

Grades
8 to 12
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Use data from a spreadsheet to instantly create an interactive map. Search the Gallery for some great ideas for using spreadsheets to make a map. Watch the "What is this ...more
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Use data from a spreadsheet to instantly create an interactive map. Search the Gallery for some great ideas for using spreadsheets to make a map. Watch the "What is this all about" video to see how easy it is to create a data map. Click "Create your map" to upload an excel or Google Docs file to be used. Users must be able to collect data using either an Excel spreadsheet or Google Spreadsheet. Upload the file to view the graphical data. Click Share to send to others. View your data in a graphical way! Data uploaded is viewable by the public. No login is required. Be sure that information used to create the graph is not private information.

tag(s): data (148), infographics (42), maps (287)

In the Classroom

Consider identifying water/electric/gas usage in various areas in your school district. Use data about car ownership to identify trends in various locations. Collect information about wildlife sightings, traffic patterns, and other interesting information to view as a graph. Have students research countless trends from around the world and create maps to share ad explain on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Be sure to ask questions about what the data implies. Why does one location differ from another? Have students hypothesize what the data means, then research information to back up their hypothesis.
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Business Insider Chart of the Day - Business Insider

Grades
7 to 12
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Find a new chart each day, based on real world events in different formats. Some days include more than one graph! The newer charts are shown first. Older charts are ...more
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Find a new chart each day, based on real world events in different formats. Some days include more than one graph! The newer charts are shown first. Older charts are available on the site by following the "older" link. Topics vary from world news to sports to economics and more. There is a great variety of topics and chart types. When you click on the chart, a new page opens containing the chart and a description with difficult vocabulary underlined. Click on a word to learn the definition. You can also sign up to receive the daily chart by email.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), cultures (105), data (148), financial literacy (80), infographics (42), sociology (22), sports (97)

In the Classroom

Share a daily chart on your interactive whiteboard or projector and have students recreate the chart into a different format (bar chart to pie chart or line graph). Have students use a tool such as Hohli reviewed here. Ask students to analyze information included on the daily chart as a math journal entry. Create a class chart comparing student information to the daily chart provided. Use the daily chart as a class warm-up - discuss trends, information provided, information not included that might be useful, etc. Social Studies teachers may want to use the charts as a tie-in to current events. Reading teachers charged with teaching about charts as part of informational texts will find a treasure trove of examples here, especially as prep for BIG reading tests.

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The World's Favorite Foods - The Guardian - U.K.

Grades
3 to 12
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This interactive map lets you roll the mouse over different countries of the world to see what their favorite foods are. Although not all countries are included, the three items ...more
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This interactive map lets you roll the mouse over different countries of the world to see what their favorite foods are. Although not all countries are included, the three items listed for each country available are interesting. There is a link to a full-text article about the results of the map.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (115), infographics (42), nutrition (154)

In the Classroom

Introduce this map by having your students poll each other on what they think the favorite U.S. foods are. Summarize the poll and then check the map. Share the map on your interactive whiteboard or projector to compare foods from around the world. Or have cooperative learning groups check out the other countries listed. Challenge groups to research countries not already included on this map and create their own "Food Maps" (or another topic) using a mapmaking site such as Mapskip, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Daytum - Ryan Case and Nicholas Feltron

Grades
K to 12
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Are you looking to collect and analyze class data easily? Choose from 16 different ways to view data. Decide the items you wish to count (the free plan allows up ...more
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Are you looking to collect and analyze class data easily? Choose from 16 different ways to view data. Decide the items you wish to count (the free plan allows up to 1000 different things to be counted.) Also determine the category the items can be placed into (use up to 24 different categories in the free account.) Add a statement panel to your display panel to add notes and make comments about the data. Be sure to click the How To at the bottom of the home page to learn how to use the Daytum site. Also click the "Watch A Screencast" link for additional help. Data can also be collected via text or Twitter tweets.

tag(s): data (148), infographics (42), statistics (122), visualizations (14)

In the Classroom

Some of the best data to collect is anything that is a habit: types of drinks students drink at home, hours watching TV/playing games/doing homework, meals/fast food, etc. Use the site to collect data from other students or classes for a Math, Social Studies, or Psychology class. Use Daytum for a Science class by counting animals at a feeder, recycling efforts, amount of paper used in the classroom, days of rain/no rain, etc. Anything that can be counted can be used by Daytum! Be sure to identify students who will be counters and recorders of the data.

Before using Daytum, be sure to follow the directions on the How To page. Be sure to decide the goal first and the data to be collected. Having an idea of the kind of data to be collected as well as how it will be displayed is necessary before using. This tool is best used as a class activity rather than creating individual accounts. Create a class account and use a class computer or computer attached to a projector or whiteboard to collect data as students enter the room. Set up the parameters of the data to be collected (or enlist the help of an ambitious student.)

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Information is Beautiful - David McCandless

Grades
5 to 12
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Want to view data and make connections in visual form? Find interesting infographics to make connections between related concepts. The general subject areas range from health to government...more
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Want to view data and make connections in visual form? Find interesting infographics to make connections between related concepts. The general subject areas range from health to government to economics to science and more. Click on 'Visualizations" to view a variety of different graphics from many different topic areas: The Billion Dollar-o-Gram, When Sea Levels Attack, Left vs. Right (US), Caffeine and Calories, and countless others. Click on the link below to view the actual data that was used to make the graphic. View comments even further below.

Keep in mind that many commenters are very spirited in their discussions! Preview the comments before sharing with your class.

tag(s): data (148), infographics (42), oil (45), oil spill (21), visualizations (14)

In the Classroom

Use the site to teach data and the display of data graphically. Allow groups of students to choose a graphic and report to the class on how the data was made more meaningful using the graphics that were chosen. You may also want to share this link as a research tool for debates or presentations on science or social studies topics. Discuss the science, history, or math behind the data collected. Discuss other information and ways of presenting the information in order to create a more interesting graphic. Provide students with options to share their findings in a multimedia presentation. Have your students create an interactive online poster ("glog") using Glogster EDU, reviewed here. Challenge students to create a video and share using a site such as SchoolTube, reviewed here. OR have cooperative learning groups narrate a picture using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here. When using data in class, discuss what makes the graphic visually appealing. Consider using data (or collecting your own) to create class graphics that show the data.
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