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Findery - Makes Places Come Alive! - Caterina Fake

Grades
3 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Findery lets you place notes and images on a virtual map that others can see (if you make it public.) Type in a location to go anywhere in the world. ...more
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Findery lets you place notes and images on a virtual map that others can see (if you make it public.) Type in a location to go anywhere in the world. Google map technology shows that location along with any notes that exist there. Add your own notes and images after registering on the site. Use the regular search bar for other searches of places such as Great Wall and countless other locations. Since the general public can add notes to locations, previewing is a good idea!

tag(s): earth (232), map skills (81), maps (292), virtual field trips (50)

In the Classroom

Use this site anytime you discuss a world location. Search the site to find notes placed by people and images of the actual location. Have your class take pictures and upload your own notes of your school and community. Use this in world language classes to explore other countries and cultures. Going on a field trip? Search Findery to see if there are notes about the location. You may find some interesting information to have in mind before leaving! Upon your return, have students place their own images and write notes for others to view. Create a class account then ask students to find items placed on the maps. Next, have them save as favorites to use with a larger project or to be included as part of a newspaper article about their topic using the Newspaper Clipping Generator.

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Lincoln Learning Hub - Dream Works

Grades
5 to 12
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Lincoln Learning Hub is the DreamWork's companion site to the movie Lincoln. Four main components are the core of the site: a timeline, What Would Lincoln Do?, Team of Rivals,...more
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Lincoln Learning Hub is the DreamWork's companion site to the movie Lincoln. Four main components are the core of the site: a timeline, What Would Lincoln Do?, Team of Rivals, and Who's Who in Congress. Click on the timeline to view an interactive display of events leading to the end of slavery. Click on images for a short synopsis of each event. What Would Lincoln Do? offers a look at what Lincoln might do if faced with other national crises such as 9/11 or women's suffrage. Click and drag images to match cabinet posts in the Lincoln administration after reading a short biography. Explore and learn more about members of congress during Lincoln's time in the Who's Who in Congress portion of the site.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): 1800s (47), civil war (145), emancipation proclamation (12), gettysburg (26), gettysburg address (18), lincoln (86), slavery (71)

In the Classroom

This site would make a great addition to any Civil War or Abraham Lincoln unit. View together on your interactive whiteboard (or projector). Create a link to the site on classroom computers. Use the What Would Lincoln Do portion of the site as a spring board for students to debate Lincoln's possible actions on other important world or national events. Have student groups or partners explore the activity and report to the class on their decisions. Challenge students to create a newspaper article about Civil War events using the Newspaper Clipping Generator.

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The Worst Jobs in History - Russel Tarr

Grades
5 to 12
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Learn about the dirtiest, most dangerous, and tiring jobs during the Medieval times, Early Modern times, and Modern times. This site has a more dated appearance, but the content is...more
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Learn about the dirtiest, most dangerous, and tiring jobs during the Medieval times, Early Modern times, and Modern times. This site has a more dated appearance, but the content is interesting. Most of the information is provided in text form. Read short descriptions of jobs and rank them according to how dirty, dangerous, or tiring you think that they are. After ranking the jobs, take a short online quiz about information read. There is also the option to download a worksheet to use with the activities. At the beginning of the activity, the site asks for your full name. (A fictitious name could always be used.)

tag(s): 1600s (14), 1700s (26), 1800s (47), 1900s (36), careers (135), industrial revolution (25), medieval (27)

In the Classroom

Use this site as part of your study of a certain era, of economics, or to open discussion about careers. Before introducing this site, have students brainstorm lists of what they consider to be dirty or dangerous jobs. Post responses using a tool such as Padlet (reviewed here) to create an online bulletin board to use to display their ideas. Share the site with students on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Allow students to explore and complete activities on their own. Have students complete the included worksheet while exploring dirty jobs. Talk about how society determines the pay for a job and what kind of job options people had at certain times in history. How do these opportunities differ from today?

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Textivate - TaskMagic

Grades
4 to 12
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Textivate is a simple web tool to automatically generate a range of online activities based on any text you enter (up to 500 words). Type or paste a chunk of ...more
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Textivate is a simple web tool to automatically generate a range of online activities based on any text you enter (up to 500 words). Type or paste a chunk of text into the text box on the Textivate front page and click on the "Textivate Now" button to see the available exercises that can be generated from that text. Choose from various activities based on the amount of text used such as drag and drop, sorting, or fill in the gaps. View an example on evaporation located here. Register on the site for further options such as uploading text, embedding your textivate onto a website, or share via hyperlink.

tag(s): grammar review (38), process writing (45), sequencing (31), summarizing (14), word order (5), word study (79)

In the Classroom

Create Textivates to introduce or review any topic. Type in a summary of information and have students place chunks of sentences in order or choose the missing word option for students to insert missing words. Instantly create sequencing activities to build comprehension and vocabulary skills. Paste in a passage from a well-known text and experiment with word order. What would happen if you tried to rearrange the wording in a famous poem? Paste in text during a world language class so students can rearrange words to practice vocabulary, word order, and various skills. Use the embed feature to insert a Textivate activity for homework. Create activities for small group practice on an interactive whiteboard center. Have students create their own Textivate activities to summarize information. Share them with classmates to complete activities. Learning support teachers can have students create and swap review activities. Be sure to share this one with parents for them to use at home for review fun!

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Instant Google Street View - Nick Nicholaou

Grades
4 to 12
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Go to Google Street View instantly with this handy site. Begin by typing in an address. As you type the screen changes automatically to the best street view image of ...more
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Go to Google Street View instantly with this handy site. Begin by typing in an address. As you type the screen changes automatically to the best street view image of what has been entered so far. Many may find the constant changing of images as you type distracting; others may find the variety of seeing new areas exciting. Click "About" in the lower left hand corner for an explanation of color boxes and controls. Download and share the view easily.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): map skills (81), maps (292)

In the Classroom

Assign students various countries, regions, or continents to make comparisons. Identify the biological, geographical, cultural, and social issues that exist in the world, based on what the pictures show and what their research uncovers. Bring a greater understanding to current economic and environmental issues in many countries. World language (or world cultures) classes can help students understand the cultures of the countries where the language is spoken. Compare specific attributes of two countries using an online Venn Diagram, such as the one reviewed here. Another idea: have cooperative learning groups use this resource to create online books about the country of their tour using a resource such as Bookemon.

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Mapas Flash Interactivos - Enrique Alonso

Grades
3 to 12
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This international, interactive map site contains over 100 puzzles and activities in English to practice map skills by location. This review should direct you to the English version....more
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This international, interactive map site contains over 100 puzzles and activities in English to practice map skills by location. This review should direct you to the English version. Removing the filter for English reveals many more maps in Spanish and other languages. Use the box at the left to select a language. You can also choose by categories of continents, countries, capitals, most visited, and more. Each map has a short description of the activity to read before opening. Double click to open a map and play. Correct responses earn points toward the maximum available.

tag(s): asia (72), canada (30), capitals (24), continents (49), countries (77), landforms (45), map skills (81), maps (292), oceans (154), rivers (22), states (163)

In the Classroom

Demonstrate how to access maps on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Allow students to explore and play on their own. Use this site for student practice or for world cultures and world language classes. Share a link to the site via your class website or blog for students to play at home.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Take Me Back To - takemeback.to

Grades
4 to 12
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See what the world was like at that time with Take Me Back To. Type in any date you want to visit. Results offer a short text passage about who ...more
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See what the world was like at that time with Take Me Back To. Type in any date you want to visit. Results offer a short text passage about who was president and what music was popular (if available). See samples of movies, magazines, book charts, advertisements, and more. Unfortunately, the site doesn't go back beyond 1900, so any search before that time will default to that date in 1900. Searches can be done on dates up to the present. Note that clicking on some of the images offered takes you to paid services or current issues of the same magazine.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): 1900s (36), 1910s (9), 1920s (16), 1930s (15), 1940s (13), 1950s (12), 1960s (30), 1970s (12), 1980s (9), 20th century (53), decades (14), timelines (64)

In the Classroom

Build context around historic dates using details of pop culture, magazines, and more. Have students search for their birthdate and write about significant events on that date. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here) to create a visual comparison of two different dates or of a past date with today. Ask students to generate questions about an important date, such as Pearl Harbor day, and use cultural details to generate a "snapshot" of what life was like before the world changed. What can you tell from the information shared here? How do you know? Challenge your students to use a site such as Timetoast reviewed here to create timelines of events in the 1900's.

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MyHistro Interactive Timelines - Jaanus Vihand

Grades
3 to 12
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Create interactive timelines of geographically-located events on Google Maps and share them on the web for free. Hover over events on the Google map (or use Google Earth) to enlarge...more
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Create interactive timelines of geographically-located events on Google Maps and share them on the web for free. Hover over events on the Google map (or use Google Earth) to enlarge and view a summary of relevant information. Click play to scroll through events in chronological order. Create your own or browse many of the timelines on the site. No registration is necessary to view timelines already created by others. Sign up with an email account to create or comment on timelines. Create a new timeline, including a title, select a category, and add as many stops on the timeline as you wish. Share using Facebook, Twitter or an RSS feed. Click "embed/share" to copy a url to share with others or an embed code to use in a blog, wiki, or other site. Choose from three privacy level settings to customize viewing options. Be aware: the comments are not moderated, so please preview.

tag(s): timelines (64)

In the Classroom

Consider creating a class account with a single login and password. Ask students to initial their timelines as well to indicate ownership. There are many ways to include this in class. Every topic in history, literature, sciences, and the arts has dates and recorded events. Use your interactive whiteboard or projector to learn about the history of the Olympics, famous people, events, literature, and more. Have students create timelines to share research projects. Use the timeline as a visual tool to discuss events in literary works or the life of a scientist, political figure, or pop artist. Create animal life cycles mapped to their habitat, author or presidential biographies, or even timelines of the events and causes leading to a war. Make a timeline using local, national, or international current events. Elementary students could even interview grandparents and create a class timeline about their grandparents' generation for Grandparents' Day. For collaboration, link up with another classroom in another town (or another country) to build a timeline that shares events in each local area so students can see what was happening at the same time in another location (maybe in the opposite hemisphere: compare weather and seasons!) Students can use the timeline as a visual aid during presentations. Student groups can work on different aspects of the same time period to share with the rest of the class. For example, in studying World War II, one student group can create a timeline of Japanese occupation, another of the German occupation, and so forth. The timelines are perfect to share on your interactive whiteboard or projector as well as on a class wiki.

Challenge your gifted students by having them create mapped timelines of contrasts: The life cycles (and locations) of two migrating species, the events leading to the end of World War II in Europe and the Pacific, the lives of two famous Americans from two different centuries. They could embed the results in a wiki page so other students can view and comment (or ask questions).

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david, TX, Grades: 9 - 12

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CurriConnects Book List: 100 Leaders - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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This CurriConnects list offers books for student independent reading about leaders. This list of leaders includes a wide sampling from politics to literature and the arts to entertainment....more
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This CurriConnects list offers books for student independent reading about leaders. This list of leaders includes a wide sampling from politics to literature and the arts to entertainment. CurriConnects thematic book lists include ISBN numbers for ordering or searching, interest grade levels, ESL/ELL levels and Lexiles '® to match student independent reading levels to challenge, not frustrate. Don't miss other CurriConnects themes being added regularly. If your school or public library does not have the books, try interlibrary loan!

tag(s): artists (76), book lists (132), politics (100), presidents (131), scientists (70)

In the Classroom

Use this list as you study any topic that features leaders: the founding fathers, famous scientists, and much more. Encourage students to read about leaders in diverse fields - including the one you are studying - to compare and discuss what makes someone a successful leader and why people rise to the top among their peers across time, place, and circumstance. You could also form an afterschool book club around this list or use the nonfiction listings as practice with informational texts.

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SoundCities - Stanza

Grades
4 to 12
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SoundCities is an open database of thousands of sounds from around the world. The site itself uses GoogleMaps. However, some of the world maps take you to Google Earth. Recordings ...more
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SoundCities is an open database of thousands of sounds from around the world. The site itself uses GoogleMaps. However, some of the world maps take you to Google Earth. Recordings range from car sounds to airport announcements and thousands of other typical city sounds. Choose a city from the list at the top of the page. Choose from pins on the map or the list of available sounds on the page. View the site's database to listen to sounds by mood such as mechanical, rhythm, or weather.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (117), maps (292), sound (103), sounds (68)

In the Classroom

Use SoundCities as a complement to information found on any map to give students another perspective of what it would be like to be in any city. Compare and contrast sounds from any included city to what is found in your community. Talk about what development does to noise and sound. Ask students to create a list of sounds found in your community (or school) that could be included in the site. During a unit on sound, talk about the ways communities handle excessive sound, applying principles of sound waves and sound transmission. In world language classes, use this site to "hear" the culture in far off cities. Allow students to create similar projects using Zeemaps, reviewed here. This tool allows students to create audio recordings AND choose a location (on a map). Students could also use Google Earth, reviewed here.

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Newsola - Nick Nicholaou

Grades
6 to 12
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This free site provides a color-coded mashup of current news headlines, clickable to see the full articles. View various sections of the news separately by clicking on the colored icons...more
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This free site provides a color-coded mashup of current news headlines, clickable to see the full articles. View various sections of the news separately by clicking on the colored icons along the top. Sort into World, National, Finance, Tech, Showbiz, and Sport. To read the full article, click on the brief story (in the box). Use the drop-down feature to search news stories in a variety of other countries.

tag(s): countries (77), financial literacy (80), news (265), sports (97)

In the Classroom

Use this site to select current events for the day. Follow the same news thread for a period of time to look at changes and possible reasons for the change in the news. Be sure to check news stories from other countries for a different viewpoint on issues. Create a class discussion for the differences in viewpoints. Challenge cooperative learning groups to explore ONE of the subtopics (Showbiz, World, Finance, etc..) and present the highlights to the class. Have students make a multimedia presentation using one of the many TeachersFirst Edge tools reviewed here.

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david, TX, Grades: 9 - 12

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Find the Data - FindTheBest.com

Grades
4 to 12
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Find interesting facts and comparisons to almost anything with this site, perfect for trivia fans everywhere! Using data from public records, manufacturer websites, and public records,...more
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Find interesting facts and comparisons to almost anything with this site, perfect for trivia fans everywhere! Using data from public records, manufacturer websites, and public records, you can view and sort information to meet your needs. Choose from main topics including economics, education, government, and more. Choose a subcategory. Refine and sort searches using filters included with each category. Change results to sort by desired results. For example, choose job salaries then sort by job title, total employment, average annual salary, or mean hourly pay. Site registration is available but not necessary.

tag(s): countries (77), data (149), ecology (135), politics (100), sports (97), transportation (41), trivia (18)

In the Classroom

Find and compare data for almost anything your class needs! Compare salaries or life spans between countries. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here). Find and compare economic data for your state, look for the biggest meteor to hit the earth, or find the earliest recorded sighting of a meteor. Share with students to use when completing research projects. Have students share the information by creating a multimedia presentation using one of the many TeachersFirst Edge tools reviewed here. Bookmark this site to use to find data or interesting facts at anytime.

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Fasten Seat Belts - 43 Films ASBL

Grades
5 to 12
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Fasten your seatbelt and get ready to take a trip to Asia or Europe! The site, Fasten Seat Belts shares videos explaining cultural norms in both Asia and Europe. There ...more
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Fasten your seatbelt and get ready to take a trip to Asia or Europe! The site, Fasten Seat Belts shares videos explaining cultural norms in both Asia and Europe. There are numerous videos and topics to choose from. Simply choose a continent from the map. Choose from the videos available explaining tips such as proper gift giving in China, where to stand on an escalator in the UK, or what color of ink is acceptable for use in Portugal. Each video is fairly short and includes a short explanation with a "Did You Know" fact in addition to the video. Use the search on the site to choose videos by country, theme, or type.

tag(s): asia (72), cross cultural understanding (117), cultures (107), europe (75)

In the Classroom

World language teachers may want to use these videos throughout the year to discuss cultural norms. Use the videos to introduce the concept of "culture" in a world cultures or social studies class. View videos before taking students on field trips-- real or virtual -- to Asia or Europe. Introduce the site to students, then challenge them to find other tips to share and create their own videos to share using a tool such as SchoolTube reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Fakebook - Class Tools

Grades
4 to 12
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Create a "fake" Facebook-style page for anyone or anything! No membership required! Give your page a title and add an image from your computer. (They insert an image for you ...more
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Create a "fake" Facebook-style page for anyone or anything! No membership required! Give your page a title and add an image from your computer. (They insert an image for you if you do not select one.) Of course you will need to use a Creative Commons or other copyright-safe image. You can also use autoselect from a websearch, edit the profile, and your page is almost ready. You must add at least one post and one friend to save work. Choose "save" from the options on top right side of the page, enter a password, and your unique url for your Fakebook page appears. Be sure to copy and save this link as it is the only time it is given in the setup process. Here is an example created in less than a minute. Page creation is quick and easy with a small learning curve. Flash is needed only to watch the introduction video, not use the site/tool. There is a downloadable Word doc "startup guide" for those who prefer written, illustrated directions.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): book reports (37), creative writing (169), social networking (110)

In the Classroom

Engage and create interest in classroom learning with Fakebook. This site is wonderful for creating interest in many subjects. In social studies, instead of a typical biographical report have students create a Fakebook page about their famous person. Write about presidents, founding fathers, famous scientists or artist, a civil war soldier, and much more. Have students create a timeline of any historical event (the page should be named for the event). Use Fakebook to outline the plot of a book, play, or film, then share with students while studying the material. To use Fakebook to study literature, create a page for the central character, book's author, or the setting of the book or play. For a unique twist is science class, create a Fakebook page for a periodic element or another science topic. Use the page to describe "the life" of that atom or element. In world language classes, have students do this activity (about themselves) in the second language they are learning. Create a Fakebook page for the first day of school to introduce yourself to students or at Open House for parents. Challenge students to create and share a page about themselves during the first week of school. Share a Fakebook page with students to demonstrate proper netiquette and social sharing. Be sure to share a rubric with students for all expectations of what should be included on their page. Make Fakebook one of the options for your gifted students doing projects beyond the regular curriculum. With no membership required, this tool is simple enough for younger gifted students who have parent permission to post work to the web. We could pretend that they do not know what Facebook looks like, but we would be deluding ourselves!

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Reading Like a Historian - Stanford History Education Group

Grades
6 to 12
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The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages you in historical inquiry. Each of the 75 lessons revolves around a central historical question. Each lesson features sets of...more
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The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages you in historical inquiry. Each of the 75 lessons revolves around a central historical question. Each lesson features sets of primary documents modified for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities. This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and more. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip's War to the Montgomery Bus Boycott (and more). Next, they make historical claims backed by documentary evidence. Choose from the units menu to find lessons divided into 12 units: introduction through the Cold War Culture/Civil Rights. Read a short overview, then choose from the list of included lessons. Most lessons are in PDF format and may include PowerPoint presentations with additional images and/or maps to use with the lesson.

tag(s): american revolution (88), civil rights (122), civil war (145), cold war (29), colonial america (108), colonization (17), emancipation proclamation (12), new deal (6), slavery (71), world war 1 (53), world war 2 (141)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this site as a resource for American history lessons throughout the year. The final segment of each lesson, the "Central Historical Question," has been noted as the most important part. If you don't have time for the full lesson, incorporate the historical question into your lesson plans as part of your classroom discussion, or journal activities. Perhaps you can use it as an essential question for your unit. Challenge students to create a talking avatar using a photo or other image (legally permitted to be reproduced). The avatars can be used to explain the central historical question. Use a site such as Blabberize (reviewed here).
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Science 360 - National Science Foundation

Grades
6 to 12
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Watch these five minute science content videos about a variety of topics such as Green Energy or Football Kinematics. Browse by category or content topic. Use the search box found ...more
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Watch these five minute science content videos about a variety of topics such as Green Energy or Football Kinematics. Browse by category or content topic. Use the search box found at the top of the page. The videos are engaging and informative. Topics vary greatly. Some topics cross over into Social Studies as scientists excavate ancient sites. Be sure to check out videos about difficult topics such as Climate Change (To What Degree).

tag(s): archeology (32), brain (70), climate (92), climate change (65), environment (321), plants (154), solar energy (40), sports (97), video (273)

In the Classroom

Use the videos to tie content into students real lives. Share the videos on your projector or interactive whiteboard. Provide this link on a wiki, blog, or site for students to find interesting information and report to the class on what they have learned. Challenge students to create their own five minute videos about a topic that you are learning about in science (or another subject). Share the videos on a site such as TeacherTube reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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YouTube Time Machine - Justin Johnson and Delbert Shoopman III

Grades
3 to 12
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Travel back in time via this video site. Slide the bar to any year from 1860 to the present. Choose a year and view a random video from that time. ...more
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Travel back in time via this video site. Slide the bar to any year from 1860 to the present. Choose a year and view a random video from that time. (Yes, we know there isn't video from 1860, but this features a YouTube video of the first sound ever recorded in 1860.) The information bar to the right of the video screen tells how many videos are available for that year and includes filters to include or exclude topics such as commercials, sports, movies, and music. Click the icon to move to a different video from the same year. Use the search bar at the top of each page to search for any topic to find videos available on the site. The one down side to the site is that videos are displayed randomly when choosing a year. It would be nice to have a complete list of all video titles available. Although the site uses Flash, there is a downloadable app available for viewing on mobile devices. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your school blocks YouTube, they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): 1800s (47), 1900s (36), 20th century (53), decades (14), timelines (64), video (273)

In the Classroom

History teachers will love using this site to give a perspective of time periods taught in class. Apply filters to limit the videos included. For example, turn off everything except current events if you are looking for news from a specific year. Share this site with students and have them explore videos available for a given time period. Use media to build a broader sense of what the time period was like. Ask student groups to watch enough that they can hypothesize a general description of what was important to people at the time, based on advertisements, news, and more. Have them keep a list of the things they observe and questions they would like to ask if they could talk to someone from that time period. Challenge students to create a newspaper article from their "era" using the Newspaper Clipping Generator. Share this site with students and challenge them to use a site such as TimeRime reviewed here to create an interactive timeline of historic events or people.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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IWitness - USC Shoah Foundation

Grades
6 to 12
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At its core, IWitness is a collection of over 1,000 audio and video interviews with Holocaust Survivors. That by itself would make it a worthy site. However, the site also ...more
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At its core, IWitness is a collection of over 1,000 audio and video interviews with Holocaust Survivors. That by itself would make it a worthy site. However, the site also permits you to search the interview database by keyword, and to edit the interviews to create your own video projects. There are links to further resources about the Holocaust and suggested lesson plans or activities in conjunction with the site. You MUST register for this site in advance, in order to be approved by the site's sponsors. Allow at least 24 or 48 hours for registration to be approved and for you to activate your membership. Read all of the tech requirements here. Most importantly please note the required browsers. Anyone using the site also needs to have Adobe Flash Player 11 or higher and RealPlayer 10 or higher installed. While the site does appear to have a lot of "tech requirements" this one is WORTH the hassle!

tag(s): digital storytelling (155), holocaust (39), jews (26), pearl harbor (12), world war 2 (141)

In the Classroom

This is a tremendously rich resource for bringing home the reality of the Holocaust using the words and images of survivors. The number of Holocaust Survivors is dwindling, and we risk losing the full impact of their experience without sites like IWitness. Search the interview archives by keyword or subject and view individual stories. Use the editing tools to collect portions of interviews into a new video presentation. Create class projects and group them by classroom section and collect multiple student presentations. The site is flexible and geared toward educators. Because it is in Beta, feedback is actively solicited, and teachers can help shape how the site can be used. Don't miss the lesson plans and activity plans as well as a good collection of other resources. The site has clearly delineated technology requirements; it would be wise to consult those prior to planning an activity.

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AirPano - AirPano.com

Grades
3 to 12
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Airpano is a stunning collection of aerial panoramic 360 degree images of famous locations around the world. They are incorporated with Google map technology. Peer down at the hustle...more
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Airpano is a stunning collection of aerial panoramic 360 degree images of famous locations around the world. They are incorporated with Google map technology. Peer down at the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong harbour or the tranquil scenery of Fiordland in New Zealand. At the time of this review, there were well over 100 AMAZING images to view. Rotate any 3D image and zoom in to see the details in finer clarity. Click on links within images to view nearby sites of interests. Read articles included with panoramas for an overview of locations. Embed a rotating image on to your site using the link found at the top left corner of each panoramic image. Zoom in and out of images, read articles about each location, turn sound on and off using links included with images. Based on the device used for viewing, choose from high or low resolution and iphone or ipad links to view panoramas. Panoramas open in a new tab/window.

tag(s): asia (72), australia (35), canada (30), china (67), england (57), europe (75), france (40), germany (28), images (276), india (36), italy (16), maps (292), new york (26), north america (19), pyramids (29), russia (38), south africa (10), south america (39)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this site for use when discussing well-known places around the world. View 3D panoramic images on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Take your students to Moscow, Paris, Vietnam, the Grand Canyon, on a hot air balloon, or many other options. This tool could be useful in science, social studies, and current event classes. Share these panoramas with world language and world cultures classes as well as when literature settings include some of these famous sites. Have students give a class :tour", explaining as they navigate on an interactive whiteboard or projector. Use the embed function to embed panoramas on your website or blog for student use at home. Share this site with students to use for research projects.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Julian Germain Classrooms Portraits Project - Julian Germain

Grades
7 to 12
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View portraits of classrooms in many cultures 2004-2012, taken by photographer Julian Germain. The collection is actually from a book. As Archive Magazine reviewer Tom Shakespeare...more
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View portraits of classrooms in many cultures 2004-2012, taken by photographer Julian Germain. The collection is actually from a book. As Archive Magazine reviewer Tom Shakespeare explains, "By presenting different pupils, different schools, different year groups, Germain asks questions about contemporary educational practices and social divisions." The photos are clearly deliberate portraits, not candids, but offer a glimpse into other cultures and a chance to ask questions about why a class ( and classroom) might look the way it does, inviting discussion about what we have in common and how each culture conducts and values education.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (117), images (276), media literacy (60)

In the Classroom

Share these photos as a writing prompt about cultural differences in a world cultures class or as a way to get students thinking before writing an essay about their "dream" school. Use the common experience of school as an entry point into conversation about cross-cultural understanding. Share on a projector or whiteboard as students use powers of observation to notice what might be different about life in another culture and how school reflects a culture's value systems. Have them write a blog post about what they see. Have students create blogs using Throwww (reviewed here). This site allows you to create "quick and easy" blogs to be used one time only. There is no registration necessary! Use this site In art class or even as a media literacy exercise. Have students jot down the words they would use to describe the emotions they see/feel in these images. What message is the photographer conveying about school? Extend the discussion by challenging students to take their own photos to portray "school." Share the photos on a class wiki, blog, or online scrapbook using a tool such as Beeclip, reviewed here.

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