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Patchwork Nation - Jefferson Institute

Grades
9 to 12
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Is the US a melting pot? A tossed salad? The Jefferson Institute suggests it is a "Patchwork Nation." This site was originally developed to chronicle the 2008 US Presidential election,...more
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Is the US a melting pot? A tossed salad? The Jefferson Institute suggests it is a "Patchwork Nation." This site was originally developed to chronicle the 2008 US Presidential election, but has been maintained and updated since that time. It presents the vast diversity of the United States using demographic data and categorizing communities into one of a dozen community types. With names like "Campus and Careers," "Military Bastions," and "Evangelical Epicenters" each community type represents an important subset of what makes up the American Experience. This site drills down much deeper than the typical red state/blue state dichotomy and challenges us to think about what characteristics work to define US citizens.

tag(s): branches of government (48), census (19), communities (35), democracy (12), demographics (19), politics (99)

In the Classroom

This site could be useful in a variety of classroom settings. A sociology class might grapple with the generalizations inherent in each of the 12 community types. What does it mean to be a "Tractor Country" community? The associated charts and demographics can help prove or disprove those theories. A government class might consider the impact of these different community types all existing within one Congressional district. How might that legislator best represent those communities at the State level or the Federal level? An economics class might speculate on the distribution of wealth in the US. What factors influence that distribution? A US History class could speculate about how these different communities have come to be. What impact has immigration had? Industrialization? Geography? Are there regional differences that could stem from the Civil War? And a statistics class would find plenty of raw data to play around with. In a "Patchwork Nation," what does it mean to be "average"?
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Spigot - spigot.org

Grades
9 to 12
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This free tool is an aggregation site for news, research, information, and opinion about learning and technology. Hover over the titles to read an abstract or click to be taken ...more
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This free tool is an aggregation site for news, research, information, and opinion about learning and technology. Hover over the titles to read an abstract or click to be taken to the site. There are video clips, slideshows, articles, and more. Share easily with others through email, Facebook, Twitter, or other social media. Interested in a specific topic? Use the tags on the left to view an entire category of related information. The site operates "automatically" by following certain feeds and web news searches, so new items appear very often. Although the title is Spigot, it could seem like "Firehose"! The content seems appropriate for secondary classrooms, but you might want to preview just before you turn students loose to be sure.

tag(s): media literacy (58), news (261)

In the Classroom

Use these articles to discuss the future of education and the use of technology both in high school and higher education. As students are the most important stakeholders in education, many of these articles are relevant to them and their future. Students will especially be interested in the Practice and Alt. Culture sections of this site. Discuss current events in your classroom and ask students to investigate an angle on technology and/or education for a persuasive writing piece or debate. Students have incredible insight into their own learning and technology use. Keep this link bookmarked on your classroom computer or linked to your blog, wiki, or class page. Use examples from this site to look for bias or editorial slant as part of an information literacy unit. Select articles for experience with informational texts.

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RADCAB - Steps for Online Information Evaluation - Karen M. Christensson

Grades
6 to 12
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RADCAB is a way to evaluate information and resources. RADCAB is a mnemonic acronym: Relevancy, Appropriateness, Detail, Currency, Authority, and Bias. Click on each word for details...more
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RADCAB is a way to evaluate information and resources. RADCAB is a mnemonic acronym: Relevancy, Appropriateness, Detail, Currency, Authority, and Bias. Click on each word for details on that topic. An excellent rubric is available for download in PDF format. This simple site is a great resource for discussing and teaching information literacy lessons about evaluating information and sources.

tag(s): evaluating sources (13), internet safety (108), rubrics (32)

In the Classroom

Share this site and content on your interactive whiteboard or projector as you begin a project involving research. Demonstrate how to use this site before allowing students to explore on their own. Print and use the rubric available on the site. Require that students (or groups) complete the rubric on their chosen sources for research. Share a link to the site on your class website and classroom computer for easy student (and parent) reference at any time. Another idea: assign cooperative learning groups one part of the acronym. Each group could create a presentation to share with the class about what they learned about their part of the evaluation process. Have students create online posters individually or together as a class using a tool such as Web Poster Wizard (reviewed here) or PicLits (reviewed here. Students will LOVE finding and sharing examples of "bad" sources!
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Find me Words - FindMeWords

Grades
1 to 12
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Find Me Words is a word generator that finds words in many different ways. You can simply type your word into the text box and click Find! Options include: Find ...more
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Find Me Words is a word generator that finds words in many different ways. You can simply type your word into the text box and click Find! Options include: Find Me a Word, Words With Letters, Definitions, Synonyms, Antonyms, and Scrabble. Enter letter combinations, look for words of a certain length or with a certain root or prefix. There is a lot here to explore. Tread carefully allowing students to search on their own as some more mature content/vocabulary is included.

tag(s): antonyms (26), phonics (75), synonyms (38), vocabulary development (126), word study (80)

In the Classroom

Add a technology twist to your word study program. Share this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector and explore together with your students. In your phonics block, go further by looking at word patterns, beginning sounds, and ending sounds. In your Greek and Latin roots study, search for words by prefix or suffix. Use as a resource for writer's workshop, using the synonyms and antonyms. Increase vocabulary with the definitions. Make words into an exploratory "game" using this site. Have students collect favorite word discoveries on their own wiki page.

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OK2Ask''®: Google 6-Part Series (Part 2): Google Search Secrets - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from November 2013, opens in Adobe Connect: Google 6-Part Series (Part 2): Google Search Secrets. Explore Super Searching...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from November 2013, opens in Adobe Connect: Google 6-Part Series (Part 2): Google Search Secrets. Explore Super Searching on Google. Find out about the various tools (and tricks) used to make searching a "snap." Learn more about Google Trends, Google Correlate, Blog Searches, Google Tools available on TeachersFirst, and more. Participants will be given time to explore. A question/answer period will also be available. This session is for teachers at Beginner to Intermediate Technology Comfort Levels.

As a result of this session and through individual follow-up, teachers will: Explore several of the various educational search tools available through Google, Browse and explore Google Trends, Google Correlate, Blog Searches, and more, Explore the many resources on TeachersFirst related to Google's offerings, (Follow-up) Create a lesson for your own classroom (or position) using one of the Google tools shared. Applicable NETS-T standards (2008)*: 1a and b, 2b and c, 3a and d. . * The text of these standards is copyrighted. Please read the full text at ISTE's NETS-T page.

tag(s): search engines (65)

In the Classroom

View this archived webinar to learn some new ideas to search on Google. Take a look at the resource page full of wonderful Seach Secrets. ! Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
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Word Sense - codeLily LLC

Grades
6 to 12
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Word Sense is a dictionary and thesaurus presented in a unique, interactive display. Enter your word in the search box and view the definition. Click on any of the related ...more
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Word Sense is a dictionary and thesaurus presented in a unique, interactive display. Enter your word in the search box and view the definition. Click on any of the related terms to view definitions and connections from the associated words. Use links to go directly to the definition of any associated word or term to continue exploring and understanding terms. There is a link to "Learn How it Works" to learn more about the possibilities at this site. We strongly recommend that you explore how it works first! Note: This is a full service dictionary, so ANY word is available for search, including those not appropriate at school. Use caution with less mature students searching independently. Be certain to set clear expectations and consequences for inappropriate searches.

tag(s): antonyms (26), dictionaries (56), synonyms (38), thesaurus (24), vocabulary (324), vocabulary development (126)

In the Classroom

Have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site. Explore word meanings, connotations, and antonyms. Use a word cloud maker to create clouds of new words learned: Wordle (reviewed here), Tagxedo (reviewed here), or WordItOut (reviewed here). Use Word Sense to understand and explore vocabulary words of the day or week. Share with students as a resource for preparing for standardized testing, such as the SAT/ACT.

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My Pop Studio - Media Education Lab, Temple University

Grades
6 to 12
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My Pop Studio is a creative play experience that strengthens critical thinking skills about television, music, magazines and online media directed. Some of the activities are geared...more
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My Pop Studio is a creative play experience that strengthens critical thinking skills about television, music, magazines and online media directed. Some of the activities are geared towards girls, but many could be used with any teenager. Choose from four opportunities to learn more about mass media: Music, TV, Magazines, or Digital. Choose a studio to begin. Registration is optional but allows you the opportunity to save progress within activities. Go behind the scenes to think about the meaning of song lyrics: how songs and media sell items and ideas. Think about how magazines alter images by viewing before and after images. Be sure to check out the section for parents and the teachers portion of the site for ideas to use the site as well as lesson plans and supplemental activities for download.

tag(s): advertising (33), media literacy (58)

In the Classroom

This site would be perfect for use with an after school program directed at teenagers or as part of a unit on propaganda and media literacy. Use lessons and activities to inspire debate and discussion on the role of media in society and especially its effect on young girls. Talk about the impact of advertising on our ideas of what matters. Include this as part of a character education or consumerism unit. Use as an independent in-class activity for girls in the classroom. Allow students to explore the site then challenge students to create a presentation using Prezi (reviewed here) to explore issues related to media literacy.
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WordSense.eu - dictionary - Dirk Moosbach

Grades
7 to 12
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WordSense.eu is part dictionary and part thesaurus, based on Wiktionary information. Type in any word in the search bar to view word origin, definitions, synonyms, and more. This site...more
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WordSense.eu is part dictionary and part thesaurus, based on Wiktionary information. Type in any word in the search bar to view word origin, definitions, synonyms, and more. This site provides a multitude of information about the words. Click on underlined words within a definition to view their definitions. Our editors note that this is an unabridged dictionary including words not appropriate for school. Discuss consequences of inappropriate use and/or avoiding using this resource with immature students. .

tag(s): dictionaries (56), prefixes (16), root words (13), suffixes (14), thesaurus (24), vocabulary (324), vocabulary development (126), word study (80)

In the Classroom

Use Word Sense on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) to explore word origins, definitions, and more. This is a great site to use as a resource for a word of the day or word of the week. Choose a word and have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as Wordle (reviewed here), Tagxedo (reviewed here), or WordItOut (reviewed here). Share this site on your class website or blog for students to access at home for writing projects. Use this tool to decipher words when studying word roots and affixes. As students prepare for the SAT, have them explore and attempt to figure out words based on roots, etc.

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OK2Ask'®: Common Core Literacy (K-8) - Oct 2013 - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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Get to the "Core" of literacy in your K-8 classroom using TeachersFirst resources. Participants will view and explore resources that help develop key literacy skills and address Common...more
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Get to the "Core" of literacy in your K-8 classroom using TeachersFirst resources. Participants will view and explore resources that help develop key literacy skills and address Common Core standards. Resources that promote collaboration and individual skill work will be shared. Participants will explore and discuss how resources can be utilized in their own classroom. This session is for teachers at ALL Technology Comfort Levels. As a result of this session and through individual follow-up, teachers will: Gather ideas by exploring 6 -10 literacy resources on TeachersFirst, Explore and practice with the suggested resources, Investigate and discuss lesson ideas offered in reviews and by other participants in the session, List and discuss curriculum projects or activities their students could do with their chosen resources, and (as follow-up) Implement one of the provided resources into an upcoming teaching unit or lesson. Applicable NETS-T standards (2008)*: 1a and d, 2a, b, and c, 3b and c, 5a. Please read the full text at ISTE's NETS-T page.

tag(s): commoncore (92)

In the Classroom

View this archived webinar to learn some new ideas about the Common Core and Literacy (grades K-8). Take a look at the resource page full of wonderful literacy ideas! Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
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Engaging Students With Primary Sources - Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Grades
6 to 12
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The Smithsonian Institution offers a printable guide to using primary sources in any classroom. View examples of how to do it and suggestion! Explore each of the main sections including...more
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The Smithsonian Institution offers a printable guide to using primary sources in any classroom. View examples of how to do it and suggestion! Explore each of the main sections including documents, photographs, oral histories, and objects for ideas and tips. Each activity is aligned to National Center for History in the Schools standards. The guide is in PDF format for easy printing and use.

tag(s): primary sources (86)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this site for use throughout the year as a guide for using primary sources. Use some of the lesson strategies with other primary source collections
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Gaming Against Plagiarism - University of Florida Marston Science Librarians

Grades
6 to 12
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Explore these three engaging interactives about plagiarism. Click on any title to begin play and read the objectives and directions. Topics include plagiarism, ethics, and cheating....more
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Explore these three engaging interactives about plagiarism. Click on any title to begin play and read the objectives and directions. Topics include plagiarism, ethics, and cheating. This is a great "digital citizenship" site! The examples of plagiarism include more subtle "offenses," such as misquoting or incorrect citations.

tag(s): digital citizenship (58), game based learning (103), gamification (65), plagiarism (35)

In the Classroom

These activities are quite simple in nature and would be perfect for use in introducing or reinforcing topics pertaining to plagiarism. Display on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) and discuss terms used and examples of plagiarism. Allow students to explore on their own in small groups to find all the "crimes." Have students create an online or printed comic discussing plagiarism using a tool like Printable Comic Strip Templates, reviewed here, or Write Comics, reviewed here. You could use Printable Comic Templates for all students to create a rough draft.
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Every Second on the Internet - designly.com

Grades
6 to 12
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Explore what happens every second on the Internet with this interesting and engaging site. View how many Skype calls and Tweets are issued each second. Find out how many happened ...more
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Explore what happens every second on the Internet with this interesting and engaging site. View how many Skype calls and Tweets are issued each second. Find out how many happened just since you began exploring the site. Keep scrolling to see graphics of Google searches, Facebook likes, and emails sent. Each action is represented with an icon making this visualization stunning and mind boggling at the same time. It provides a sense of the magnitude of information offered on the Internet each and every second.

tag(s): internet safety (108), social networking (112)

In the Classroom

This site is perfect for use on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) during lessons on computer use or Internet safety. Have students predict the number of Google searches, emails sent, etc. each second before displaying the actual number. Use information on this site as part of a lesson on comparisons, fractions, or number sense with large numbers. Share with parents during your Open House to offer an understanding of the impact of computers and social networks on their students lives.

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Scrible - Scrible

Grades
8 to 12
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Scrible is an annotation tool that allows you to identify content on any web page. Add notes and tags, and then bookmark the notes into a research collection. Download the ...more
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Scrible is an annotation tool that allows you to identify content on any web page. Add notes and tags, and then bookmark the notes into a research collection. Download the Scrible bookmarklet to your toolbar to begin. Use multiple colors to highlight, underline, or strike through web page content. Add sticky notes to any web page to include your own comments and categorize annotations using type and color to organize saved content. Share annotations via email easily using the share function. You can also save it to your own library available in "the cloud" from anywhere. Free accounts offer 125 mb storage or 250 mb for student accounts. Student accounts also include features to capture citations, create bibliographies, and compile notes from multiple articles into one report. Note: student accounts require a school-issued email address (edu or k12 type).
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): bookmarks (60), citations (34), note taking (32)

In the Classroom

There are so many applications and possibilities for this site! Use prompts on articles to build Common Core skills analyzing informational texts. How many times have we heard students complain during a group project, "But I couldn't get to his or her house to work on it?" Tell them to use Scrible to interact online. The research and conversations created through highlighting and annotating what they read can greatly enhance both their research skills and their online interaction on academic level skills. Or use the site to post and share discussion assignments on specific articles or even parts of articles using the highlighting tool. Find a relevant article to your subject. Highlight the part that you want students to read. (If students are younger, keep it short to reduce the intimidating reality of too much information for kids.) Attach a note with a discussion question for the students. Have them comment on the link in a "class discussion" as an outside assignment. If you are fortunate enough to have all students with computer access in your class and at home, such as in one to one laptop (or byod) program schools, you can use this essentially to run your class. Post assignments or post readings. Science teachers can post online interactive labs, and more.

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Smarterer - Dave Balter, Michael Kowalchik, and Jennifer Fremont-Smith

Grades
8 to 12
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Smarterer helps identify what you know about many subjects and helps identify your weaknesses in others. Explore tests by categories such as games, language and writing, or math and...more
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Smarterer helps identify what you know about many subjects and helps identify your weaknesses in others. Explore tests by categories such as games, language and writing, or math and finance to begin. Choose a test and take a practice question which will not count on your score. Take complete tests after signing in using your Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn account. You can also use your email. View scores at the end of each test and your ranking on a scale from beginner to master based on comparisons to other test takers. Create your own tests easily using step by step directions provided on Smarterer. Give your test a title, then add questions and multiple choice responses. Choose to let others add questions to your test or not. Tests will appear on Smarterer after approval from the site moderators. The site continues to add new tests, many user-created.

tag(s): assessment (99), business (58), computers (94), quizzes (97), test prep (96)

In the Classroom

Use Smarterer to help students identify areas to improve in different skills. Use some of the tests for students to "test out" of curriculum such as email etiquette in computer class or to motivate students to learn about real world skills they will need in the job market. Share this site with students to use at home for quick assessments in many subjects. Create your own tests to use for review and share with students to take and identify areas for further study. Demonstrate how students can track progress through retaking tests (students will need their own account).

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Saylor - Free Online Courses Built by Professors - Michael J Saylor

Grades
8 to 12
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Choose from almost 300 courses to take for free at Saylor. Topics range from general education to computer science and professional development. There is a K-12 area that includes Common...more
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Choose from almost 300 courses to take for free at Saylor. Topics range from general education to computer science and professional development. There is a K-12 area that includes Common Core information (for teachers or parents), test prep, and English lessons. Explore a specific area of study to find courses or choose the course list to view all offerings. Some courses include a full textbook and/or a full set of video lectures and are listed on the content matrix. Each course lists learning outcomes, course requirements, and a course overview. Create your own eportfolio to enroll in courses, track progress, download transcripts, and engage with the online community. Pass the final exam of each course to receive a certificate of completion.

tag(s): professional development (123)

In the Classroom

Allow gifted students to enroll in courses that interest them or that provide enrichment beyond classroom content. Share with others in your building as a resource for professional development. Explore the topics yourself for some new, engaging topics to round out your own expertise. Allow students to enroll in a course that would fit into their career goals as an exploratory opportunity in that field.

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Ultimate Research Assistant - Andy Hoskinson, LLC

Grades
7 to 12
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Use this free tool to compile search results from various domains. Search your term using the entire Internet, Wikipedia, Government sites, Non-Profits sites, the National Institutes...more
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Use this free tool to compile search results from various domains. Search your term using the entire Internet, Wikipedia, Government sites, Non-Profits sites, the National Institutes of Health and more! The results of the search can be viewed in a summary, a bar chart of popular themes, and a word cloud. Click on Taxonomy to view the results for each theme or Mind Map and see the hierarchy of the results.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): media literacy (58), search engines (65), search strategies (30)

In the Classroom

Use this tool to locate a variety of search results about a topic of study or interest. Be sure to place a link to this site on your class computer or web page. Discuss bias and different ways of reporting on an issue by using the same search term with the class using different domains. For example, one group can search any popular issue such as climate change, gun control, or food policy issues using Government sites while another group uses the same search term with Educational sites. Teach the value of identifying good search terms, continuing to refine terms to get quality results. Once students are familiar with this tool you can do the same as above using the Jigsaw cooperative learning approach, and when students come back together to discuss their findings they can create a simple infographic sharing their findings from the articles (including different points of view and bias) using Easel.ly, reviewed here or Venngage reviewed here. As a completely separate use, mark this one in your favorites to test search when you believe a student project may be plagiarized.

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Story Maps - Esri

Grades
5 to 12
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Story Maps takes learning in a new direction. Interactive maps tell a story through videos, images, audio, and links. Learn more about the topics in text that accompanies each map....more
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Story Maps takes learning in a new direction. Interactive maps tell a story through videos, images, audio, and links. Learn more about the topics in text that accompanies each map. A timeline of "dots" allows you to move through the story step by step. A satellite view is available on some maps, and legends give you important information to read the map accurately. A wide variety of topics are available to inform and educate. Use the search bar to find a map to meet your needs. Travel to the most visited National Parks or explore an interactive map of the three days and decisive moments of the battle of Gettysburg. It is important to pay as much attention to the text pop-ups as the cartography and other aspects of the map. New stories are added every two weeks. so come back often! This review was for the free area of the site that allows you to view the map stories. There are extensive directions on how to create your own maps, but these suggest purchase of maps, etc. from ArcGIS, an affiliate of Esri. Some of the map storytelling ideas could be used with other free mapping tools, however.

tag(s): gettysburg (26), map skills (80), maps (288), measurement (159)

In the Classroom

Map out interactive virtual field trips on Story Maps. Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students explore this site independently or in small groups. Have a team competition as students navigate the site on an interactive whiteboard to complete a scavenger hunt. Students can find geometric shapes in real life objects on the images with the maps. Calculate distances or time if the map is a timeline of events. Use this site as an anticipatory set or "activator" to introduce a unit or lesson on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Make a shortcut to this site on classroom computers and use it as a center. Be sure to help your weaker readers and ESL/ELL students by sharing the vocabulary words prior to reading, either on a handout or by projecting them on an interactive whiteboard and highlighting them in the text as you come to them. Have students create online posters to summarize what they learned from the map, individually or together as a class using a tool such as Web Poster Wizard (reviewed here) or PicLits (reviewed here. Ask students to write informational essays on the topics or use the maps to write creative stories. Challenge your most tech-savvy or gifted students to explore the step by step map storytelling directions and try their hand using google Maps or other map tools. The advice in these directions is excellent.

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Manifest Destiny - The Story of the US Told in 141 Maps - Michael Porath

Grades
6 to 12
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Manifest Destiny is an excellent interactive map site demonstrating the growth of the United States from March 1789 through the present. Click on each of the maps to view and ...more
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Manifest Destiny is an excellent interactive map site demonstrating the growth of the United States from March 1789 through the present. Click on each of the maps to view and highlight changes. Click on highlighted words to view areas on the map. Use the legend on the right side of the page to help interpret what each color represents on the map. Jump ahead to the Civil War (or a few other notable US History events), by clicking the links on the main page. Read "about" to learn about the Swiss information scientist who created this page from information available on Wikipedia.

tag(s): 1800s (44), 1900s (33), 20th century (51), civil war (145), colonization (16), maps (288)

In the Classroom

Use Manifest Destiny as a resource for any American History unit. Share the maps on your projector or interactive whiteboard. The many maps are an excellent visual demonstration of the growth of the US. Use information from the site to have students create timelines (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles (reviewed here). Include this site in lessons about information literacy and evaluating sources in your history course. Challenge students to verify the accuracy of the information depicted. Was wikipedia right?

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The Question Generator - Department of Education, Victoria

Grades
1 to 12
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The Question Generator does just what its title says. Click on the "spin" button and question starters will appear for both closed and open ended questions. Closed questions are valuable...more
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The Question Generator does just what its title says. Click on the "spin" button and question starters will appear for both closed and open ended questions. Closed questions are valuable for acquiring background information on a topic. Open ended questions are valuable for research and discussions. Find it easy to create both at the Question Generator! View the introduction video to learn more about using this tool.

tag(s): questioning (31), writing prompts (92)

In the Classroom

Use the Question Generator along with any fiction or nonfiction reading to help your students think more deeply. Use as a starting point in research projects. With the Common Core State Standards and their focus on close reading, rigor, and critical thinking, this is the perfect tool to use to make sure you are challenging your students. Introduce students to this tool when they need to create essential questions for their research, or when developing questions for their literature circle group. Learning support students can gain practice thinking beyond the "facts" by creating and talking through their own questions. Before you start, generate a list of key words from the unit: terms such as arachnids or homeostasis or names of historic figures, so they can then insert the terms into the question starters from the generator. Your interactive whiteboard or projector would be an ideal place to generate some questions together before turning students loose to generate some of their own. Be sure to record/save the list of questions you create on a class wiki or blog-- or even on old fashioned butcher paper as students go off to resolve them. Revisit the questions late in the unit to see which are still unresolved. Ask the class which question would make the best essay question on the final "test." Maybe allow them to choose their own? In world language classes, these simple questions could lead to practice with dialog.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Spific - The Finding Engine - Spific.com

Grades
6 to 12
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Spific is search engine designed to narrow down searches by the use of filters (they call them "refinements"). Although it is powered by Google's search algoithm, it is not affiliated...more
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Spific is search engine designed to narrow down searches by the use of filters (they call them "refinements"). Although it is powered by Google's search algoithm, it is not affiliated or endorsed by Google. Enter your search term as usual. Choose where you want results to come from among several categories. Categories include news and newspapers, Internet directories, dictionaries, videos, movies, and much more. Refine results even further by choosing specific newspapers or websites within results. A date range narrows news results.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): search engines (65)

In the Classroom

Use Spific to find online newspaper content quickly and easily or compare definitions from different sources. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram (reviewed here) to compare information from two different sites. Provide a link for students to use this site to make searching easier when working on book reports, research projects, or presentations. Demonstrate how to use the search on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) and point out how to narrow down results using links to individual sites. This site would be ideal to include in a search engine comparison for information literacy/fluency lessons.

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