TeachersFirst - Featured Sites: Week of Nov 26, 2017

Here are this week's features. Clicking the tags in the description area of each listing will present a list of other resources with this topic. | Click here to return to the Featured Sites Archive

 

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The Code Player - thecodeplayer.com

Grades
6 to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Learn to code through videos demonstrating actual typing of code to create items from scratch. Scroll through the page to choose a demo featuring HTML5, CSS, Javascript and more. Click...more
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Learn to code through videos demonstrating actual typing of code to create items from scratch. Scroll through the page to choose a demo featuring HTML5, CSS, Javascript and more. Click the demo image, then Play, Walkthrough, or View code. Project ideas include creating an interactive to-do list, text bubbles, or hover over information over images, and much more. After selecting a video, go to the upper left corner and click to play the walkthrough or view the code. Playing the walkthrough takes viewers through typing the code from beginning to end. There is no audio/sound.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), design (95), STEM (168), tutorials (50), video (278)

In the Classroom

The Code Player is an excellent tool for anyone who prefers to watch demonstrations to learn instead of reading or listening to directions. Depending on the coding abilities of your students, choose one of the demos to display on an interactive whiteboard or with a projector and learn together. Have groups of students choose a different coding format to complete an activity. Use this site as a model for you or your students to create your own screencasts sharing how-to projects with coding. Use a tool like Screencastify, reviewed here. Screencastify works with the Chrome browser to record your screen and capture audio recordings. Have more advanced students create their own coding projects for classroom use.

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Snap! (Build Your Own Blocks) - Jens Monig and Brian Harvey

Grades
5 to 12
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Learn to code through drag and drop features with Snap! In addition to the drag and drop technology, Snap! allows users to write scripts to control features of the program. ...more
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Learn to code through drag and drop features with Snap! In addition to the drag and drop technology, Snap! allows users to write scripts to control features of the program. For those familiar with Scratch, reviewed here, Snap! includes features that take it beyond simple drag and drop to make it an excellent application for introducing coding to older students. Visit the example page to view projects designed using Snap! For an even more comprehensive list of examples, visit this collection, put together by the designer of Snap!.

tag(s): animation (65), coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), design (95), drawing (84), problem solving (289), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

Share Snap! on an interactive whiteboard or with a projector to provide an overview of the features included then allow students to explore on their own. Save projects to your own computer or create an account to save on the site. Search YouTube for video tutorials on using this program and share with students as they build an understanding of how to use the site. Begin by creating a small project together, then allow students to work individually or in groups to create their design. Share links to student projects on an online bulletin board like Lino, reviewed here. Challenge students who are proficient with Snap! to create video tutorials using a tool like My SimpleShow, reviewed here.

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TechRocket - iD Tech

Grades
4 to 12
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TechRocket offers coding and design courses for kids aged 10 to 18. Earn points and badges through completing courses. Courses provide instruction in Python, iOS, Java, Minecraft, and...more
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TechRocket offers coding and design courses for kids aged 10 to 18. Earn points and badges through completing courses. Courses provide instruction in Python, iOS, Java, Minecraft, and 3D printing. Free membership offers access to five courses and seven free Hour of Code classes.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), critical thinking (119), design (95), logic (235), problem solving (289)

In the Classroom

Coding is an excellent way to teach critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Use this site as homework, a center, or in a lab setting. Courses are self-paced, so differentiation is easy. Explain to students that coding is a critical skill in today's world filled with technology and will also be a valuable skill in the job market. Many jobs that will require coding do not yet exist. Put a link to this tool on your class website, blog, or wiki. Since registration is via email, for young students consider using a "class set" of Gmail subaccounts, explained here; this tells how to configure Gmail subaccounts to use for any online membership service. Using Gmail subaccounts will provide anonymous interaction within your class.

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Edabit - Matt MacPherson

Grades
6 to 12
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Learn to code with Edabit and their progressively difficult interactive challenges. Start by using your email to register. Begin with challenges that match your coding skills, then...more
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Learn to code with Edabit and their progressively difficult interactive challenges. Start by using your email to register. Begin with challenges that match your coding skills, then continue learning as you progress through more challenging activities. Each Edabit Challenge includes a problem, practice with code, help resources, and a discussion area. As users complete coding challenges, they earn experience points and unlock new skills through real-world situations.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), engineering (128), problem solving (289), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

Coding is an excellent way to teach critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Use this site as homework, a center, or in a lab setting. Activities are self-paced, so differentiation is easy. However, it is still a good idea, if possible, to seat a more experienced computer user with one who is less experienced. Explain to students that coding is a critical skill in today's world filled with technology and will also be a valuable skill in the job market. Many jobs that will require coding do not yet exist. Put a link to this tool on your class website, blog, or wiki.

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codeCampus - Raj Sidhu

Grades
K to 6
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Learn to code in just a few hours with codeCampus's standards-aligned curriculum. Try your first hour of training for free and receive 20 hours of lesson plans. codeCampus provides...more
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Learn to code in just a few hours with codeCampus's standards-aligned curriculum. Try your first hour of training for free and receive 20 hours of lesson plans. codeCampus provides free school accounts with signups from administrators or technology specialists with additional hours of training and lesson plans.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), logic (235), problem solving (289), professional development (162)

In the Classroom

Make your staff the envy of all other schools with your coding prowess! Sign up for a school account and learn about coding together. Once finished, take advantage of the free lesson plans for teaching coding to your students.

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Microsoft Touch Develop - Microsoft

Grades
4 to 12
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Create apps to work on any device using Microsoft Touch Develop. Launch Touch Develop to access tutorials and showcases to begin. The editor adapts to your skill level from beginner...more
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Create apps to work on any device using Microsoft Touch Develop. Launch Touch Develop to access tutorials and showcases to begin. The editor adapts to your skill level from beginner to expert. Step by step video directions provides information on how codes work and then allows you to create code for each step.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), design (95), problem solving (289)

In the Classroom

Use Touch Develop as a computer center or during Hour of Code lessons. Encourage students to view programs others have created, then try making their own. If your school has an after-school computer club, Touch Develop is perfect for use in teaching and practicing coding. Consider pairing students who have more computer experience with those who have less. Touch Develop is also an excellent opportunity for "new" coders as it allows them to create and share interesting apps with little background knowledge of computer programming. Have students share their completed apps during a computer or STEM showcase at your school.

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Minecraft Hour of Code Tutorials - code.org

Grades
2 to 12
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Use code to make your own Minecraft game or learn the basics of computer coding by moving characters through a Minecraft world with these Hour of Code activities. These two ...more
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Use code to make your own Minecraft game or learn the basics of computer coding by moving characters through a Minecraft world with these Hour of Code activities. These two activities teach and reinforce coding skills through the familiar Minecraft game. After watching a video introduction, users follow instructions to place code to move characters within the game.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), design (95), problem solving (289), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

Make coding part of science inquiry or math logic in any classroom. Include it as part of scientific method or discussions about careers in science. You may even want to portray coding as just another "world language" in today's world. Be sure to look at all the implementation advice before introducing these extensive coding resources to your class. It would be wise to complete the Hour of Code yourself, so you will feel comfortable helping students if they get stuck. Better yet, invite a few students to do an hour with you after school and learn together! You will have a team of "techsperts" to help their peers. Plan an hour of Code on nationally designated days or on your own calendar! Invite the PTA/PTO to host a coding event. Select a video from this site to use to introduce Computer Science to your students. If you only have a few computers, introduce this tool using a projector or interactive whiteboard and bookmark it as a learning station with earbuds/headphones. Encourage students to help each other when they have difficulty. Share this on your website for students to use at home, too.

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Girls Who Code - Reshma Saujani

Grades
6 to 12
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Girls Who Code is an organization founded to help close the gender gap in technology. They have three programs offering girls the opportunity to explore coding with peers. The Clubs...more
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Girls Who Code is an organization founded to help close the gender gap in technology. They have three programs offering girls the opportunity to explore coding with peers. The Clubs Program is for girls in grades 6-12 and meets two hours each week in local schools and provides opportunities for computer training for beginners through advanced learners. The Summer Immersion Program offers a 7-week training for 10th and 11th-grade students in coding and exposure to jobs in the technology field. Accepted students receive stipends for transportation and living expenses to attend the program. Campus is a two week program for girls grades 6-12 and has a fee. Enter your city, state, and zip code to see a map for clubs in your area, or consider contacting the organization to start a club in your area. While most of the content on this site is appropriate for middle school girls, please preview before you share.

tag(s): coding (65), communities (38), computers (100), critical thinking (119), logic (235), women (94)

In the Classroom

Share this site with your school's administration or anyone willing to consider leading an after-school computer program for girls and ask them to become a sponsor. Be sure to share information on the Summer Immersion Program with your high school guidance counselor and technology teachers as an excellent opportunity for interested students.

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E.A.K. (Erase All Kittens) - Drum Roll

Grades
1 to 6
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Erase All Kittens is an online activity that teaches HTML coding. As you play, learn how to build ledges, add boxes, and more as your friend Arka endeavors to save ...more
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Erase All Kittens is an online activity that teaches HTML coding. As you play, learn how to build ledges, add boxes, and more as your friend Arka endeavors to save the missing kittens. Short demos and tips throughout the activity guide players on how to add and edit code. Erase All Kittens works best in Firefox and Chrome browsers. This review is for the free DEMO only.

tag(s): coding (65), computers (100), critical thinking (119), logic (235), problem solving (289), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

Introduce Erase All Kittens on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Allow students to explore and learn on their own at classroom computer centers or individual laptops. Provide a link to Erase All Kittens for students to access at home. Create a bulletin board for students to post achievement levels. Have student "coding experts" create video tutorials using Screencast-o-matic, reviewed here, and share them on a site such as TeacherTube, reviewed here.

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Coding Resources - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected to help teachers and students learn about coding, and for use as a guide for finding the appropriate tools for use...more
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This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected to help teachers and students learn about coding, and for use as a guide for finding the appropriate tools for use with all grade and skill levels. Nurture problem solving, logic, and creativity. Find resources for just one hour of code or for use as ongoing technology lessons.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), critical thinking (119), design (95), problem solving (289), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

Explore these resources for use with after-school computer clubs or as an excellent tool when recruiting skilled parent volunteers. Turn the intimidating content of computer programming into an exciting learning adventure for all with these helpful sites!

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CoderDojo - CoderDojo Foundation

Grades
1 to 8
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Interested in coding and looking for others who are interested as well? CoderDojo is an open source movement of free coding clubs for young kids that is led by volunteers ...more
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Interested in coding and looking for others who are interested as well? CoderDojo is an open source movement of free coding clubs for young kids that is led by volunteers and found around the World. Activities vary with each "club" but all focus on coding. Click "Organize a Dojo" to become a volunteer organizer. You are then responsible for setting up and maintaining the dojo. Not a coding master? Don't let that discourage you. Organizers are responsible for bringing learners and technical experts together. Students can click "Attend a Dojo" to find a location nearby to join. Volunteers can also find a dojo nearby to offer their services.

tag(s): coding (65), communities (38), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), engineering (128), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

When asked, explain that coding is just another "world language" in today's world. Team up with the PTA/PTO or other groups in your community to find others interested in being part of a Coderdojo. Your Coderdojo can be considered an after school club, but on a larger scale can bring students from various backgrounds together for the common purpose of learning to code.

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Code - Hadi & Ali Partovi

Grades
K to 10
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Code is designed to spark interest in learning to code, especially among girls and the very young. Find lessons for beginners, Kindergartners to tenth graders (or older). Start by clicking...more
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Code is designed to spark interest in learning to code, especially among girls and the very young. Find lessons for beginners, Kindergartners to tenth graders (or older). Start by clicking Learn in the top menu bar. Find an Hour of Code with 20 puzzles that use a drag and drop process and problem-solving skills. Complete the Hour of Code and select Beyond One Hour. Find everything an early coder needs to get started coding: A K-8 Intro to Computer Science, Tutorials that teach Javascript, Tutorial apps for any device, Learn to program with robots, and many others. There are also "unplugged tutorials" for classrooms without computers. On the top menu, click on the Teach button to find the link to videos (half way down the page) from famous people about how and when they learned to code. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube. Code.org is available in 20 languages.

tag(s): coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), problem solving (289), STEM (168), women (94)

In the Classroom

Make coding part of science inquiry or math logic in any classroom. Include it as part of scientific method or discussions about careers in science. You may even want to portray coding as just another "world language" in today's world. Be sure to look at all the implementation advice before introducing these extensive coding resources to your class. It would be wise to complete the Hour of Code yourself so you will feel comfortable helping students if they get stuck. Better yet, invite a few students to do an hour with you after school and learn together! You will have a team of "techsperts" to help their peers. Select the Learn button from the top menu to find two links for educators. The one at the top of the Learn page gives quick tips for prepping for the Hour of Code. The one at the bottom of the slide gives complete instructions for implementing the Hour of Code in your classroom. Plan an hour of Code on nationally designated days or on your own calendar! Invite the PTA/PTO to host a coding event. Select a video to use to introduce Computer Science to your students. Introduce this tool using a projector or interactive whiteboard and bookmark it as a learning station with earbuds/headphones. Encourage students to help each other when they have difficulty. Share this on your website for students to use at home, too. Code teaches the basics. Those students who show a keen interest in coding could learn more by using a program such as Codeacademy, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Tynker - Krishna Vedati

Grades
3 to 8
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Learn computer coding using simple and easy activities, lesson plans, and an interface sure to please all ages! Click Schools to access the free school activities, or click on Hour...more
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Learn computer coding using simple and easy activities, lesson plans, and an interface sure to please all ages! Click Schools to access the free school activities, or click on Hour of Code to find ones you can use at home or school. Build an animated character (everyone loves the zombie) and then animate it. Create Minecraft Mods, Skins, and learn Game Design. Learn to code by dropping blocks of commands into sequence on the left side of the screen and seeing the results along the right. The lessons provide step by step instructions, missions, and other materials to learn to code. Teachers can create a class and add students to the class. Click on student view of each lesson to see the tools and student tasks. Follow the instructions along the right panel. Note the tools that are along the top including undo and redo! This tool also features a question bar along the top. Note: This free portion of the resource offers six introductory lessons, a visual programming environment, an art studio to draw and paint your own scenes, and a media gallery. The free units of lessons have unlimited student space.
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tag(s): animation (65), coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), computers (100), critical thinking (119), design (95), game based learning (128), gamification (81), problem solving (289), STEM (168)

In the Classroom

Use this tool to learn basic coding skills. Students will quickly catch on to this program when allowed to "tinker" and see what they can make. Provide a simple assignment with defined rules/tasks to learn the tools. Younger students may familiarize themselves more easily working with a partner. Be sure to recommend that students "ask three before me" (the teacher). Have students use an online storyboard to write down what they plan to do/draw/say with their creation, and to help you keep tabs on students and their progress. For creating digital storyboards see Amazon Storybuilder, reviewed here, or Storyboard Generator, reviewed here. When finished with these Tynker lessons, move to other free tools such as Scratch, reviewed here. Teachers of even very young gifted students can turn them loose with these challenges when they have already mastered math or science curriculum. Have them create a creature they can explain to the class or share with gifted peers in other classrooms.

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Scratch - Lifelong Kindergarten Group, MIT Media Lab

Grades
1 to 12
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Want to get in touch with your inner child? Get Scratch! Warning: The use of this application is quite fun and engaging! Scratch is a downloaded program that creates interactive ...more
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Want to get in touch with your inner child? Get Scratch! Warning: The use of this application is quite fun and engaging! Scratch is a downloaded program that creates interactive stories, animations, games, music, and art. This application can be used for bringing simple ideas and projects to life. It has great use as a paint program without using the animations. Downloads/install files are available for Mac or PC. Other links include a Getting Started PDF, Help screens to show what each block controls and how to use, and a Reference Guide which provides an overview of the interface. A support page is also available for help in using the application.

Material created can only be viewed within the program. Drawings are not saved as a JPG or pic file. However, a "snapshot" of the screen can be created by using these keys in Mac: apple, shift, and 4 and click/drag to surround the portion to save. In PC use: control/print screen. These snapshots can be uploaded or used as a picture in other applications.

tag(s): animation (65), coding (65), Computational Thinking (14), critical thinking (119), design (95), drawing (84), problem solving (289)

In the Classroom

Quick start: Click stage and in the center pane, click on backgrounds. Click on paint to make a new background. Different colors, pens, and materials can be used to create the background or an image can be brought in from your computer. Objects in Scratch are called a Sprite and can be added in by choosing the folders below the screen. By clicking the script tab, blocks can be moved in to create motion, add sounds (even record your own message), and change the look of the Sprite. Blocks are linked on to each other to create a series of events. A control block dragged to the top of the blocks control which key starts the event. Advanced options include adding variables and other controls.

Be sure to check with your Technology Department, as many districts require authorization to download or install new applications. Projects can be shared online; however an account is required.

Work is saved to the computer itself and only shared online via an account. To avoid problems concerning content made by outsiders or issues with sharing, save the work locally and either create your own gallery on a supervised class website/wiki or set up a single account where you share the "best" projects online via your own log-in. Remind students of the school's Acceptable Use Policy and consequences of violations, if you do allow them to join/share. Images used should adhere to all copyright rules. Use pictures taken in class or those with Creative Commons licensing (and provide attribution!).

Practical tips: Students quickly catch on to this program when allowed to play and easily see what they can make from it. Provide a simple assignment with defined rules/tasks to learn the tools. Younger students may familiarize themselves more easily working with a partner. Have students use a storyboard to write down what they will do/draw/say in their creation in order to keep tabs on what students and their creations.

Possible uses: For the lower grades, Scratch provides unlimited possibilities. Use as a new way to show vocabulary usage. Use the paint program to add information to a picture from your class field trip or science experiment. Use Scratch to help in storytelling a concept in a new and unique way, such as how rocks are formed. In the upper grades, use Scratch to show complex material in a new way. For example, students can draw DNA and show replication, etc. through their drawings and storytelling. Draw the different movements of landforms in plate tectonics. Draw or illustrate solutions to Math problems.

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