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Anti-Racism For Kids 101: Starting To Talk About Race - Books for Littles

Grades
K to 5
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Discover several recommended books for beginning conversations with children about race and racism. Share these books that show how people of color are not single-faceted: they are...more
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Discover several recommended books for beginning conversations with children about race and racism. Share these books that show how people of color are not single-faceted: they are individuals whose ethnic heritage is something valuable to explore, and their ancestors' traditions, achievements, and challenges impact who they are today. Some books will help explain to children how cultural diversity makes us stronger. Other book collections on this site include Inclusive Body-Positive Kids, Waaay Before We Talk About Sex: Kids Books for Squeamish Parents, Diverse Family Constellations in Kids Books, and Immigrants Belong Here: Books to Help Kids Advocate for Human Rights. There are other "difficult" conversation collections on this site, too.
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tag(s): african american (92), hispanic (20), racism (67)

In the Classroom

Though this site is affiliated with places to buy books i.e., Amazon, you can also find these books at your public library. An alternative would be to consider a "Wish List," either online with Amazon or publish it in your newsletter that goes home to parents and that you can mention at back-to-school night.

After reading the book to the class or a small group, ask students to think about what the author was trying to tell the students about the topic (diversity, etc.). Ask for volunteers to answer. Remind students to be respectful of others' opinions during an open discussion. Use the books suggested on this site to start a discussion as to why the topic is important. After this discussion you may want to use Flipgrid, reviewed here, to have students consolidate their learning by stating what they learned from the book and possibly replying to another classmate's response to the book.

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