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IWitness Activity Library - USC Shoah Foundation

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K to 12
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This activity library includes over 400 ready-made lessons and activities in various languages that focus on teaching about the Holocaust. These resources are a companion to the main...more
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This activity library includes over 400 ready-made lessons and activities in various languages that focus on teaching about the Holocaust. These resources are a companion to the main IWitness site, < a href="/single.cfm?id=14082">reviewed here. Use the filters to narrow resources by type, language, or subject area. Lessons are also correlated to several different standards, including ISTE and Common Core. After selecting an activity, view a summary and click the download link to access all links for lesson materials such as videos and a PDF teaching guide.

tag(s): civil rights (145), difficult conversations (37), empathy (24), holocaust (37), social and emotional learning (43)

In the Classroom

Include lessons from the IWitness site with your lessons related to the Holocaust and when teaching about prejudice and empathy. Increase comprehension of the complex ideas related to the Holocaust and prejudice using mind maps to organize and clarify information for students using a digital mind mapping tool such as MindMup,reviewed here. MindMup offers various tools that make it easy to build simple mind maps for use with younger students or enhance learning in more complex ways by adding links to documents, videos, and images. Extend learning by asking students to design and produce podcasts using Buzzsprout, reviewed here, to tell the story of the Holocaust and share stories of how to build empathy for others.
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Change Begins at School - Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility

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K to 12
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Morningside Center provides resources for K-12 educators that encourage social responsibility and help develop social and emotional skills. The site was created following 9/11 to help...more
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Morningside Center provides resources for K-12 educators that encourage social responsibility and help develop social and emotional skills. The site was created following 9/11 to help teachers address sensitive issues that arose in the aftermath of the tragedy. Select the Classroom Resources section to find and filter TeachableMoments lessons. Sort by topic area, subject, and grade level or search by keyword. Each lesson includes instructions and background information as well as links to supporting material. The site is constantly updated with lessons relating to current events. Many activities include links to YouTube videos, if your district blocks YouTube; then the videos may not be viewable.

tag(s): bullying (52), climate change (67), conflict resolution (6), disasters (37), diversity (32), elections (75), holidays (130), politics (100), racism (59), religions (57), social and emotional learning (43), women (96)

In the Classroom

Engage students in any of the provided lessons by starting with a simple poll using Updwn, reviewed here. For example, ask students if they are familiar with the topic discussed, have experienced a similar emotion, or display an image on your whiteboard and ask students if they know what it represents. Enhance learning throughout any of the lessons by sharing additional resources using a curation tool such as Padlet, reviewed here. Add links to videos, articles, or online activities related to the lesson's content. As you complete lesson activities, extend learning by asking students to share their understanding by creating digital books using Book Creator, reviewed here, flyers made with Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here, or infographics created with Canva Infographic Creator, reviewed here.

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Discussing Tragic Events in the News - Morningside Center

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K to 12
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Although tragic and difficult world events are challenging to discuss, it is important to understand that they are on students' minds as they come into the classroom. This article provides...more
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Although tragic and difficult world events are challenging to discuss, it is important to understand that they are on students' minds as they come into the classroom. This article provides specific questions and discussion formats that help support students during difficult times and fosters a sense of community. The five basic questions offer students opportunities to share their feelings and reflect upon ways to address similar problems in the world and their community.

tag(s): differentiation (55), disasters (37), social and emotional learning (43)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site to use as a resource for fostering productive class conversations as needed when discussing difficult events. Be sure to share this site with parents who are also dealing with students that are dealing with tragic events at home. After allowing time to reflect upon the events and your classroom discussions, some students may need additional time to process the information. Provide an additional outlet using Google Jamboard, reviewed here. Create a Jamboard that allows students to add sticky notes anonymously that share their feelings or solutions to difficult problems. Curate resources for students (and parents) that include age-specific information such as news articles, videos, and background information using a curation tool such as Wakelet, reviewed here. Consider creating a Wakelet for parents and guardians with information to use at home to support students in meaningful ways. Provide students a creative outlet to share their emotions by suggesting they create short videos, flyers, or websites using the free tools found at Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here. Find more resources to help facilitate difficult conversations on this Special Topics Page.

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Teachers' Guide to Cranky Uncle - John Cook

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6 to 12
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How do you teach students to understand and build resilience against misinformation? Try using this game created by George Mason University scientist, John Cook, that uses cartoon personifications...more
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How do you teach students to understand and build resilience against misinformation? Try using this game created by George Mason University scientist, John Cook, that uses cartoon personifications of climate science denials. The game is available to play on any browser or download the app from the Apple Store or Google Play. By teaching how others use fake experts and cherry-picking information to spread disinformation, this game engages players as they employ critical thinking skills to build points and learn how to separate fact from myth. The Teacher's Guide features all you need to know to understand how to set up the game for your class, the basic premise and information found in the game, and classroom activities that accompany the game's features.

tag(s): DAT device agnostic tool (167), digital citizenship (70), game based learning (160), internet safety (112), media literacy (82), social media (43)

In the Classroom

Add this game to your toolkit of lessons and activities when teaching Internet safety and media literacy skills. The Teachers' Guide already includes many ideas on integrating the game into classroom lessons and includes using technology to enhance and extend learning. Use these ideas as a starting point to build student engagement and help them understand the real-world applications for the information found in the game. For example, use the suggested Padlet, reviewed here, activity to compile quiz questions as suggested in Activity 5. After completing that activity, have students create their own videos, fake social media posts, or news articles that contain misinformation and create quiz questions for their peers to complete. Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here, is an excellent tool for students to use when creating websites, videos, flyers, and infographics. As a final project, and to extend learning, have students share what they learned with others by producing podcasts using Buzzsprout, reviewed here, or digital books for younger students using Book Creator, reviewed here.

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Rock Your World - Creative Visions

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6 to 12
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This middle school and high school curriculum challenges students to think about challenges faced in their communities and beyond, then develop campaigns to overcome the obstacles found....more
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This middle school and high school curriculum challenges students to think about challenges faced in their communities and beyond, then develop campaigns to overcome the obstacles found. Based upon Common Core Standards, the program includes over 70 lessons that begin engaging students through developing an understanding of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Lessons don't have to take place in the order offered; select lessons that fit the goals chosen for you and your students.

tag(s): civil rights (145), social and emotional learning (43), women (96)

In the Classroom

Include these free lessons in a variety of ways in your classroom. Use the content to help students understand social causes important to them and how to engage in their cause. This site offers various methods to create social issue campaigns, including music, film, and persuasive writing opportunities. Use this information to differentiate learning opportunities for students with activities that appeal to their interests. For students interested in coding, use Minecraft Education Edition, reviewed here.
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World's Largest Lesson - Project Everyone

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K to 12
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World's Largest Lesson provides resources for educators that teach students about 17 Global Goals created by the leaders of the 193 countries of the United Nations. Visit the Resources...more
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World's Largest Lesson provides resources for educators that teach students about 17 Global Goals created by the leaders of the 193 countries of the United Nations. Visit the Resources portion of the site to browse through the many activities. Narrow your search using the provided filters to locate information by grade level, topic, type of activity, and more. Downloadable lessons include complete directions, printable worksheets, and key questions highlighted during the lesson. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (141), earth (180), energy (144), engineering (108), environment (232), inequalities (23), maps (217), STEM (214)

In the Classroom

Discover the many free educational resources found on this site to include with your lessons about global cultures, the environment, health, and technology. Use the activities and lessons found on the World's Largest Lesson to engage students in understanding and processing information related to serious global issues. Have students use a collaborative whiteboard tool such as Jamboard, reviewed here, to brainstorm solutions to problems using the sticky note feature or to create mind maps and flow charts to organize further research. Enhance learning by asking students to create an interactive, choose your own adventure story using StoryLab, reviewed here. Ask students to use information learned from their lessons to create a story that tells what happens if the earth continues on its current course vs. what happens when suggested changes are implemented.
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Resources to Develop a Positive Self-Identity - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy...more
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy self-esteem about their own self-identity, without devaluing the dignity of those that may be different than they are. The resources shared in this section help teachers to enable students to recognize that people have multiple identities and are members of multiple groups within our society, creating complex and unique individuals.

tag(s): bias (15), difficult conversations (37), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to self-identity. This collection includes lesson plans, blogs, book suggestions, and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Resources Related to Difficult Conversations - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult...more
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult to discuss with students. The resources in this collection will give you ideas on how to start and facilitate tough conversations about topics like inequality, injustice, and politics sensitively while still accomplishing learning goals. You'll also find lessons and activities to encourage respectful conversation, inclusivity, empathy, and understanding.

tag(s): difficult conversations (37), empathy (24), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Explore this collection to use to engage in difficult conversations in your classroom. Learn more about difficult conversations and empathy for others in some of the informational readings.

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Understanding Empathy - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and...more
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and is an essential component of relationship building, resolving interpersonal conflicts, and understanding cause and effect. In this collection, we share resources that will help you create lessons and experiences that cultivate empathy in your students and informational websites about this important topic.

tag(s): empathy (24), perspective (11), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Help your students to develop empathy for others. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page or on your school's LMS.

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Resources on Racism and Discrimination - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism,...more
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism, and orientation discrimination can be difficult topics to broach in the classroom but are essential to discuss as students find their voices and form their understanding of the world. In this collection, we share resources about combatting racism, lesson plans about the human cost of discrimination, and additional activities to spark meaningful discussion and encourage students at all grade levels to treat all people with respect.

tag(s): black history (81), empathy (24), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to racism and discrimination. This collection includes lesson plans and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Fake News - Real News vs. Fake News - Pace University

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4 to 12
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This helpful page provides information to help users understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to...more
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This helpful page provides information to help users understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay alert and recognize fake news. It also shares suggestions on how to avoid disinformation by identifying the use of techniques such as sensational headlines. Be sure to check out the Breaking News Consumer's Handbook located at the bottom of the website that includes eleven ways to identify and recognized fake news stories and resources.

tag(s): digital citizenship (70), internet safety (112), journalism (65), media literacy (82), news (237)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources for teaching how to navigate online information. Include this website within a learning management system such as ActivelyLearn, reviewed here, to build a complete learning unit that includes articles, videos, and assessments that fully immerse and engage students in the learning activities. Enhance learning throughout the school year using Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and organize online information. For example, create a Padlet that includes a column for each of the four categories of fake news mentioned on this website, then ask students to share examples found during online use. Extend learning by asking students to become the teacher through presentations on how to recognize and avoid fake news. Provide a variety of options for student presentations including a comic creation tool like ToonyTool, reviewed here, Biteable, reviewed here, to create simple video explainers, or use Minecraft Education Edition, reviewed here, and have students create a game to teach the hazards of disinformation.

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7 Easy Activities That Encourage Students to Open Up About Identity and Privilege - Jodi Tandet

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8 to 12
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Foster discussions on diversity, identity, and privilege with the seven activities shared in this article. In addition to specific activities, the author also discusses methods for...more
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Foster discussions on diversity, identity, and privilege with the seven activities shared in this article. In addition to specific activities, the author also discusses methods for making the activities more inclusive and how to debrief to promote self-reflection among students. Each activity description includes the purpose of the activity, instructions, the key debrief question, and a bonus inclusion tip.

tag(s): character education (64), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Include activities from this article to get to know your students or as part of character education lessons that focus on diversity, identity, and privilege. Be sure to take advantage of the tips that offer suggestions for including all students, especially those with disabilities such as vision, hearing, or mobile impairments. Some activities, such as the fourth one, include vocabulary that may or may not be familiar to students. Enhance learning by creating word clouds using WordClouds, reviewed here, that encourage students to brainstorm concepts associated with these terms.

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5 Powerful lesson ideas to help students find self-identity - Lucie Renard

Grades
5 to 12
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Encourage students to reflect upon and understand their self-identity with five lessons adapted from Katja Schipperheijn's book, Digital Citizen. Lesson activities encourage students...more
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Encourage students to reflect upon and understand their self-identity with five lessons adapted from Katja Schipperheijn's book, Digital Citizen. Lesson activities encourage students to share opinions, consider their interests and expertise, and introduce themselves to others using only 250 characters.

tag(s): character education (64), identity (21), professional development (236)

In the Classroom

Use ideas found in this article to encourage students to reflect upon their self-identity and reflect upon how they want to be viewed by others. The fifth lesson suggests using Bitmoji, reviewed here, to build avatars to reflect self-image. Incorporate this activity with the 250 character response to extend learning and tie together students' physical identity ideas with their concept of what makes them unique. Use Canva Edu, reviewed here, and have students upload their Bitmoji and response to create a flyer that introduces them to others.

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Ten Teacher Recommendations in Facilitating Conversations About Race in the Classroom - H. Richard Milner IV

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5 to 12
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Discussions of race and society in the classroom are difficult for many teachers. This article provides ten specific ideas that encourage, cultivate, and support race with students....more
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Discussions of race and society in the classroom are difficult for many teachers. This article provides ten specific ideas that encourage, cultivate, and support race with students. Although created with middle school and high school students in mind, this article is also adaptable to the elementary level.

tag(s): bias (15), civil rights (145), difficult conversations (37), professional development (236), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article as part of your professional development activities within your grade level or building as a support for understanding best practices on how to address racial issues, bias, or any difficult conversations that arise in a classroom. One way to really focus on this topic is to discuss one of the ten specific ideas each month. As a staff, share situations where the idea worked well or discuss ways to continue building a supportive environment built upon the topic focus. If you use Microsoft products, create a collaborative document using OneNote, reviewed here, to share ideas and participate in online conversations. Google users may want to consider using Google Keep, reviewed here, as a collaborative tool.

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LGBTQ History and Why It Matters - FacingHistory.org

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10 to 12
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Examine history through the lens of LGBTQ people and events with this lesson provided by FacingHistory.org. Challenging students to consider their current knowledge of history, students...more
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Examine history through the lens of LGBTQ people and events with this lesson provided by FacingHistory.org. Challenging students to consider their current knowledge of history, students participate in reflective and analytic activities that provide insight into experiences not included in typical historical narratives. This lesson includes printable exercises for students, along with suggestions for teaching strategies and extension activities.

tag(s): bias (15), civil rights (145), difficult conversations (37), sexuality (15)

In the Classroom

This lesson plan includes many excellent activities and resources that work well as a stand-alone lesson or to incorporate into your current history units as a supplement to provide a new perspective that highlights bias, gender, and civil rights issues. Discussing LBGTQ issues may lead to difficult conversations in the classroom; use this lesson to provide factual information within current history lessons. This site includes a variety of ideas and descriptions of teaching strategies that work well with any lesson. Be sure to bookmark this page to use as a reference for strategies to incorporate within many of your current units. One strategy mentioned is the use of exit cards as a reflective response or class discussion. Learn more about incorporating exit tickets as an authentic learning activity by viewing the archive of the July 2018 OK2Ask webinar, Measuring Authentic Learning Activities with Exit Slips, reviewed here. Consider sharing this lesson with your school's guidance counselor to use when counseling students who are dealing with identity or gender issues.
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Lesson Plan: Exploring Identity - Cari Ladd

Grades
9 to 12
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What makes up an individual's identity? This lesson plan includes video clips to introduce identity and then culminates with students creating a self-portrait using items or elements...more
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What makes up an individual's identity? This lesson plan includes video clips to introduce identity and then culminates with students creating a self-portrait using items or elements that share key aspects of their self-identity. Note: this is an archived version of the lesson plan found on PBS POV (Points of View), and the video links are not available on PBS. However, they are available by searching on YouTube and using each video's title to find and use the video in your lesson.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (64), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Incorporate this lesson into your current study units related to learning about identity, differences between people, bias, and character education. Use this lesson with younger students by finding videos with students that are the approximate age of those in your class. The lesson includes a study guide to accompany the videos, use edpuzzle, reviewed here, as an alternative to a paper worksheet by adding questions and comments to appropriate areas within each video. As students complete their self-portraits, add them to a class book created using Book Creator, reviewed here. In addition to a picture of each self-portrait, ask students to create a short video sharing and discussing the characteristics they identify as important to their identity. Share your book with students in lower grade levels to help them learn how to celebrate differences in others.
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Identity and Characteristics Lesson - Equality and Human Rights Comission

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8 to 12
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Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher...more
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Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher notes to identify the concept of identity, reflect upon students' characteristics, and then take a broader look at the class's shared attributes. This lesson includes links to download the teacher notes, slides, and student worksheets.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (64), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Use this lesson, and others found on this site to teach students about identity characteristics and assist in understanding bias. Incorporate the use of Google Slides, reviewed here, to enhance instruction by creating cohesive activities within the slides. Within your slide presentation, create slides for each group to use for the different activities. For example, the starter activity asks students to compare images of babies and adults. Use a table for students to add their thoughts under each of the categories. Add links within your slide presentation to the worksheets shared on the site and to Wordle, reviewed here, to create a class word cloud.
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White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack - Peggy McIntosh

Grades
10 to 12
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This article from the National Seed Project discusses the concept of white privilege and identifies some of the daily effects of this privilege. Most notable in the article is the ...more
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This article from the National Seed Project discusses the concept of white privilege and identifies some of the daily effects of this privilege. Most notable in the article is the list of conditions the author defines as attached to skin color privilege compared to those based on class, religion, ethnic status, or geographic location. In addition to the article, a series of notes for facilitators is included for presenters using My White Privilege Papers series.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (64), civil rights (145), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with others as part of your ongoing professional development about racism and bias. It is also practical to use with older students as part of lessons on racism. Make it easier for students to break down the information in the article through the collaborative use of Fiskkit, reviewed here. Upload the article to Fiskkit and share the link with students. Ask them to highlight areas of interest and add comments. Follow the author's advice and encourage students to draw on personal experiences as part of their discussions. One method for sharing experiences is through the use of short audio discussions using Synth, reviewed here. Think of Synth as an audio version of Twitter; users record up to 256 seconds of audio that work together to build powerful podcasts.

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'Interrupt The Systems': Robin DiAngelo On 'White Fragility' And Anti-Racism - Ari Shapiro/NPR

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9 to 12
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NPR's Like Kit series shares this article and audio from a recent podcast featuring a discussion with author Robin DiAngelo. DiAngelo shares suggestions for white people with specific...more
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NPR's Like Kit series shares this article and audio from a recent podcast featuring a discussion with author Robin DiAngelo. DiAngelo shares suggestions for white people with specific ideas on how to reflect upon their racism. Other recommendations include tips on how to educate yourself by engaging in resources created by people of color. This article contains many links to supplemental information, including books and a 21-Day Habit Building Challenge.

tag(s): authors (94), bias (15), character education (64), civil rights (145), difficult conversations (37), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources to discuss racism, bias, or when addressing difficult conversations in the classroom. Use a curation tool like Padlet, reviewed here, to share and discuss articles, videos, and online information. As students research and learn more from other authors, help them organize information using SuperNoteCard, reviewed here. SuperNoteCard is a virtual notecard taking tool similar to the familiar 3X5 index cards used for notetaking by hand. Use notecards to keep a list of authors and articles, jot down big ideas, and compare suggestions for making positive changes.

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'Me And White Supremacy' Helps You Do The Work Of Dismantling Racism - Eric Deggans/NPR

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9 to 12
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This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla ...more
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This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla Saad, an East African, Black Muslim author. It includes defining terms such as "white-centering" and "ally cookies" to help readers understand white privilege. Another focus of the article is using journals to develop a conscious awareness of behaviors and thought processes.

tag(s): bias (15), black history (81), cross cultural understanding (141), identity (21), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other materials when teaching about racism, bias, identiy, or cross-cultural understanding. The interviewee shares responses in the article by raising questions for individuals to consider and use for reflection. Ask groups of students to take different questions to discuss and respond to as part of your article's discussion. Extend learning by asking them to share their findings by creating concept maps using a tool such as mindmaps, reviewed here, or with a presentation using tool like Prezi, reviewed here. Consider using Wakelet, reviewed here, as a curation tool for collecting and sharing resources with students, and also as a presentation tool for students to share their learning with peers.

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