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The 1619 Project Curriculum - Pulitzer Center

Grades
5 to 12
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The 1619 Project Curriculum includes a comprehensive set of teaching materials to bring the 1619 Project into your classroom. The 1619 Project began with a special issue of the New...more
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The 1619 Project Curriculum includes a comprehensive set of teaching materials to bring the 1619 Project into your classroom. The 1619 Project began with a special issue of the New York Times suggesting that United States history begins with the arrival of the first enslaved African Americans in 1619. The curriculum includes lessons for all grades, including a Reading Guide with warm-up questions, discussion ideas, and extension questions correlated to Common Core Standards. Other materials on this site include a lesson plan based on the kids' section of the 1619 Project and an Index of Terms and Historical Events. Additionally, this site offers lesson plans contributed by other educators, and activities to extend student engagement.

tag(s): 1600s (15), american revolution (74), civil war (129), colonial america (92), slavery (56)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the wide variety of materials included in this curriculum as part of any lessons on slavery, civil war, and early American history. As you introduce the 1619 Project to your students, ask them to work with a partner or in groups to highlight and identify important information. Many of the student materials are available as PDF documents, have students work in groups to highlight important information or information that needs additional clarification. If you work with older students, use a digital annotation tool like Hypothesis, reviewed here, to add and share notes for discussion. As students become familiar with the content found in the 1619 Project, ask them to demonstrate their understanding of the materials through their choice of multi-media tools. Suggestions include asking students to create a newsletter with the arrival date of the first enslaved African-Americans using Smore, reviewed here, or use Preceden, reviewed here, to build and customize a timeline of events featured in the article. Use the information found on the site to extend learning further and help students make real-life connections to the material by asking students to use the information learned to direct and act out different events in history. Consider asking different groups to create a series on ongoing podcasts using Anchor, reviewed here, to tell the story of American history beginning in 1619 and share their podcasts using school social media accounts.
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