TeachersFirst - Featured Sites: Week of Apr 22, 2018

Here are this week's features. Clicking the tags in the description area of each listing will present a list of other resources with this topic. | Click here to go to the Featured Sites Archive

Share TeachersFirst's weekly Featured Sites automatically on your teacher blog, wiki, edtech resource page, or educator web page. Use our Featured Sites embeddable widget offered here.

 

Less
More

Media Literacy - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Peruse this curated list to find resources related to media literacy. Media literacy is a set of skills that help people to analyze, evaluate, and create messages in a wide ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Peruse this curated list to find resources related to media literacy. Media literacy is a set of skills that help people to analyze, evaluate, and create messages in a wide variety of media modes, genres, and formats. To become media literate, students must learn to raise the right questions about what they are listening to, watching, or reading. Media literacy education is about helping students become competent, critical, and literate in all media forms so that they can appropriately interpret what they see or hear rather than blindly accepting what they are told. This collection of resources includes lesson ideas, activities, and resources for teaching media literacy skills. Be sure also to check out the media literacy professional learning resources.

tag(s): critical thinking (120), cyberbullying (48), digital citizenship (68), evaluating sources (16), internet safety (118), media literacy (65), news (262), primary sources (93), professional development (164), social media (24)

In the Classroom

Today's messages come in many forms and literacy can no longer refer simply to the ability to read and write. Prepare your students to be literate citizens with this collection. Many are ideal for whole-group instruction, while others would work best on individual devices. Read the reviews to find classroom use ideas with each review. Although the list of tools is mainly geared towards grades 4-8, there are a few resources for the primary grades.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

MediaLit Moments - Consortium for Media Literacy

Grades
7 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
MediaLit Moments are short, focused lessons for middle school and high school students teaching important AHA! concepts leading to an understanding of the use of social media. Each...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

MediaLit Moments are short, focused lessons for middle school and high school students teaching important AHA! concepts leading to an understanding of the use of social media. Each experience consists of key questions related to core concepts using video and online materials and activities for students to explore the topic taught. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): cyberbullying (48), internet safety (118), media literacy (65), social media (24)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many lessons on this site to teach important media literacy lessons to your students. Share videos and articles on your interactive whiteboard to watch together. Stop as needed to add questions, comments, or highlight important information. You may want to use a video tool such as Vizia, reviewed here, to embed questions, comments, and polls into the videos. Then you can show the videos to the whole class or flip your classroom and have them watch the videos at home. This will leave time in class to discuss comments and questions students may have. Ask students to create blogs sharing their thoughts and research using an easy blogging tool like Telegra.ph, reviewed here. When finished with a lesson, ask students to create a book teaching the concept to other students. Book Creator, reviewed here, offers an online book creation tool that includes the use of media like video, audio recording, and more.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Reader - MindSky

Grades
K to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Reader is an app for desktop and mobile devices that allows you to save articles without a lot of the clutter. Sign up using your email and password, then activate ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Reader is an app for desktop and mobile devices that allows you to save articles without a lot of the clutter. Sign up using your email and password, then activate your account using the link sent to your email. Follow directions to download the app if you think you will be using Reader on a regular basis. However, you don't have to download the app. You can just click the "+" sign at the top right and enter the URL of the article you want to read right in your browser. Reader's features allow you to highlight and share articles. Viewing options include several themes and font options. All features are fully functional in your browser, too! Editors note, the activation link to create an account was not sent immediately. Be sure to create and set up your account well in advance before using it. Check your spam folder if you don't find the activation link.

tag(s): DAT device agnostic tool (179), media literacy (65), reading comprehension (124)

In the Classroom

Download Reader onto classroom computers and mobile devices for saving and sharing web articles. This app is especially useful for ESL/ELL or Special Education students to help remove distracting information. After reading articles, have students share their thoughts using a voice recording tool like Vocaroo, reviewed here, then share their recordings on your class website. Share several articles with students using Reader, then post an essential question on Recap for younger students, reviewed here, or on FlipGrid for older students, reviewed here. Both Recap and Flipgrid allow students to post video question responses, then add comments to the posted responses creating an excellent tool for collaborative discussions. Share student responses and discussions with a class podcast using Podcast Generator, reviewed here.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

OK2Ask: Fostering Accountability: Media Literacy in the Classroom - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session from October 2017, opens in Adobe Connect. As digital media increasingly replaces traditional media, students must have...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session from October 2017, opens in Adobe Connect. As digital media increasingly replaces traditional media, students must have the skills to think critically about these new types of texts. Media literacy - the ability to skillfully read and write in a wide range of message forms - allows students to identify themes and issues emerging from popular culture. Media literacy standards have been incorporated across content areas and grade levels in all 50 states. Join us to learn more about this information age survival skill and how to prepare lessons in time for media literacy week. Participants will: 1. Understand the importance of teaching media literacy in the classroom; 2. Explore media literacy resources; and 3. Learn to use the 5 key questions of media literacy when planning lessons. This session is appropriate for teachers at all technology levels.

tag(s): digital citizenship (68), media literacy (65)

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use learning technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Text to Speech Reader - WellSource Ltd

Grades
K to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Drag, upload, or paste text files to convert your text to speech instantly. Choose from many voice and language options for replay. Other options allow control over the speed of ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Drag, upload, or paste text files to convert your text to speech instantly. Choose from many voice and language options for replay. Other options allow control over the speed of your speech replay. Use the upload icon to save to your computer.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): chinese (50), french (91), german (66), spanish (111), text to speech (18)

In the Classroom

Share with world language learners to hear text spoken in the native language. Use this site with ESL/ELL students to convert small pieces of text to their native language. Use the speed options to slow down speech for students who are language learners. Use this site with students who have difficulty reading, especially when working with more challenging passages and text. Include a link to this site on your class website for students to use when learning new vocabulary in a different language and for your ESL/ELL students to hear something read or pronounced both in and outside of class.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

World Press Freedom Map - NewseumEd

Grades
7 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
Discover what a free press really is and how many of the world's nations enjoy a free press using the NewseumEd activity World Press Freedom Map. You don't have to ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Discover what a free press really is and how many of the world's nations enjoy a free press using the NewseumEd activity World Press Freedom Map. You don't have to make a trip to Washington D.C. to learn from this activity, instead, use the accompanying link for the Freedom House interactive map. Download the worksheet/chart in PDF or as a Word document for distribution. You must be a registered NewseumEd member to access this resource; however, membership is free.

tag(s): freedom of speech (11), journalism (54), media literacy (65), news (262), newspapers (96)

In the Classroom

Begin by showing students the Freedom House interactive map and read the information in the right column about what a genuinely free press is. Compare that info to a partly free press (explained just under it). Then have students work in small groups or with a partner to fill out the worksheet/chart. Complete a class discussion of the chart, and then have the small groups or pairs choose one of the countries with partial freedom of the press and research what other freedoms the U.S. enjoys that are restricted or repressed for the citizens of that country. Add these to the chart. Challenge students to convert their paper worksheet/chart to an online digital infographic to present their findings using Visme, reviewed here, or to set up their own graphic organizer to show the comparisons using an online tool such as TUZZit, reviewed here. TUZZit allows you to create diagrams, mindmaps, and other visual graphic organizers.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Text Mode - omarr.com

Grades
K to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Text Mode is an easy-to-install extension for Chrome browsers that removes all information from web pages except text. Convert distracting, hard to follow web pages into clean black...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Text Mode is an easy-to-install extension for Chrome browsers that removes all information from web pages except text. Convert distracting, hard to follow web pages into clean black and white text with a click of a button. Once installed, click the "T" on your browser toolbar to turn Text Mode on or off when viewing any page.

tag(s): media literacy (65), reading comprehension (124)

In the Classroom

Install Text Mode on all classroom computers for use throughout the year. Turn distracting images off when sharing web pages with a projector or on an interactive whiteboard to help students focus on content. Use this tool in technology training with students to share how images, videos, and ads change the look of web content. Share how adding images helps viewers understand the content. Text Mode is excellent for use with ESL/ELL and special education students as a method for focusing. Share web pages with images to help students get the big picture, then remove images to deliver and understand the content offered.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Glean - Digital Literacy Teaching Tools - The Public Learning Media Laboratory

Grades
6 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Small but mighty, this site has several lesson plans for the digital classroom. Use, share, and help create digital literacy lesson plans using Google Docs at Glean. Also, use the ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Small but mighty, this site has several lesson plans for the digital classroom. Use, share, and help create digital literacy lesson plans using Google Docs at Glean. Also, use the hashtag #lessonhack on Twitter to follow the development of ideas and the lessons. Use the drop-down menu for Lessons to view plans for Media, Data, Information, Network Literacy, and also find Security and Privacy lessons. Find plans already created that include, To Teach Memes, Teaching Media Making, Terms of Service, and there are several others about the Internet and IPs. One lesson on Safer Sexting states, "This is not intended to condone sexting; rather it is designed to provide young people (at risk through their sexting behavior) with digital literacies and personal practices to mitigate negative impacts of the sexting they've done."

tag(s): computers (102), digital citizenship (68), internet safety (118)

In the Classroom

Computer Literacy teachers and those responsible for teaching Internet safety in any course are sure to find a lesson they need. Take advantage of these free lessons to educate students about the basics of the Internet from safety to reading the terms of service to creating or sharing memes. After these lessons, challenge students to create a simple infographic about what they learned using Piktochart, reviewed here. The lessons and (some of) the descriptions include resources you may want to share with parents and school counselors so they can have a conversation about the topics with their students. Discuss topics on this site as part of Internet safety lessons. Share this site with school counselors as a resource for teens facing online safety issues.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

'45 Words' Video Lesson - NewseumED

Grades
8 to 12
1 Favorites 0  Comments
    
Brought to you by NewseumED, this video is a perfect fit to introduce any unit on the First Amendment and its freedoms. Find a comprehensive lesson plan, watch the video ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Brought to you by NewseumED, this video is a perfect fit to introduce any unit on the First Amendment and its freedoms. Find a comprehensive lesson plan, watch the video through the NewseumEd site, and download documents in either PDF or Word formats. The documents include a list of historical figures and their involvement with the issues from the period, and a viewing guide worksheet for students to fill in. All of the actors' words, in the video, are direct quotations taken from primary sources. Since the video focuses on the origins of the freedom of the press, it would make a fascinating intro to a media literacy unit, too.

tag(s): civil rights (119), constitution (88), media literacy (65), video (278)

In the Classroom

Whether studying the First Amendment or media literacy, upload this video to a tool such as EDPuzzle, reviewed here, to edit the video to show only portions you select, or to pause the video automatically and add questions for students to answer, and/or add your verbal comments. Some of the Discuss questions would be appropriate to insert after viewing parts of the video. Break students into small groups after the video and assign them different Discuss questions for reflection and investigation. Challenge small groups to create a presentation to share what they learned using a tool like Slidebot, reviewed here. After watching and discussing the video, extend either a media literacy unit or a civics/government unit. Do this by asking students to view news articles in our present political situation i.e. election time, civil rights discussed, etc. Then have them compare how the news media during the late 1700s would have handled issues of today, and how politicians of the Federalist party would have reacted to our issues today. Alternatively, have students create a simple infographic comparing the problems in the news of then and now. Use a tool such as Infogr.am, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

R4S: Research for Success - INFOhio

Grades
9 to 12
5 Favorites 1  Comments
    
Designed as an interactive online course this site helps high school students develop the sophisticated research skills needed for college and careers, an important component of most...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Designed as an interactive online course this site helps high school students develop the sophisticated research skills needed for college and careers, an important component of most standards. The formal research process is broken down into six steps: Ask Good Questions, Finding Information, Selecting the Best, Putting It Together, Your Presentation, and Making the Grade. Students work through a variety of activities linked from outside sites, including reading articles, watching videos, and completing worksheets. Each module is introduced by Voki avatars, reviewed here. Several popular research tools, such Zotero, reviewed here, and Evernote, reviewed here, are introduced. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): citations (37), classroom management (159), digital citizenship (68), evaluating sources (16), inquiry (34), media literacy (65), organizational skills (128), search strategies (28)

In the Classroom

R4S would be perfect for use as a blended-learning or the flipped classroom experience for upper high school into the first year of college. You can have students work online, or you can download into your course management system. Have students work through all the steps as part of a research assignment, or use only the parts relevant to them. Teachers need to register to receive the text copy of the helpful teacher's guide. Use the site in any subject or curriculum area.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Comments

Will be integrating this unit into freshman comp at the community college where I teach researched argument, the first English class students are required to complete. Patricia, NJ, Grades: 6 - 12

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Media History Digital Library - Media History Digital Library

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Come to the Media History Digital Library to find digitized classic media periodicals available from the public domain. All of the collections pertain to the cinema, broadcasting, and...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Come to the Media History Digital Library to find digitized classic media periodicals available from the public domain. All of the collections pertain to the cinema, broadcasting, and sound. Periodicals such as Business Screen, Pictures and Story Magazine, Motion Picture Classics, and Radio Age have at least a five-year spread of content. Over 100 other periodicals are featured. When selecting a periodical, you may choose to read, download, or go directly to the site. Join the blog to discover recent additions, scholarship opportunities, events, and more.

tag(s): art history (77), media literacy (65), multimedia (62)

In the Classroom

Use Media History Digital Library in your classroom as a secondary resource to discover the culture and setting of a time period while studying literature or even through history classes. List the clues and details that provide further information. Analyze the article use and its influence on society by using close reading techniques. In a multimedia class, discover the history and progression of cinema, broadcasting, and sound. Use to discover the influence of critical world events such as world wars, depressions, economic influences, an industrial revolution, and more. Analyze the artistic changes throughout time.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Media Smarts - Canada's Centre for Digital and Media Literacy

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Media Smarts is a comprehensive Canadian site devoted to media literacy and critical thinking skills for children and youth. Browse through several topics such as digital and media...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Media Smarts is a comprehensive Canadian site devoted to media literacy and critical thinking skills for children and youth. Browse through several topics such as digital and media literacy to explore articles related to television, Internet, and gender issues. An extensive teacher resource section offers many lessons and resources searchable by grade, subject, and media type. Download lessons in PDF format using links in the lesson description.

tag(s): media literacy (65)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site to explore and use with lessons related to digital and media literacy. Share articles on gender and body image with students. Have students find examples on tv and use an online poster creator, such as PicLits, reviewed here to demonstrate examples. Have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as WordItOut, reviewed here. Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Venngage, reviewed here.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

My Pop Studio - Media Education Lab, Temple University

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
My Pop Studio is a creative play experience that strengthens critical thinking skills about television, music, magazines and online media directed at youth. Some of the activities are...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

My Pop Studio is a creative play experience that strengthens critical thinking skills about television, music, magazines and online media directed at youth. Some of the activities are geared towards girls, but many could be used with any teenager. Choose from four opportunities to learn more about mass media: Music, TV, Magazines, or Digital. Choose a studio to begin. Registration is optional but allows you the opportunity to save progress within activities. Go behind the scenes to think about the meaning of song lyrics: how songs and media sell items and ideas. Think about how magazines alter images by viewing before and after images. Be sure to check out the section for parents and the teachers portion of the site for ideas to use the site as well as lesson plans and supplemental activities for download.

tag(s): advertising (33), media literacy (65)

In the Classroom

This site would be perfect for use with an after school program directed at teenagers or as part of a unit on propaganda and media literacy. Use lessons and activities to inspire debate and discussion on the role of media in society and especially its effect on young girls. Consider using the discussion activity Socratic Smackdown, reviewed here, for the discussions. Talk about the impact of advertising on our ideas of what matters. Include this as part of a character education or consumerism unit. Use as an independent in-class activity for girls in the classroom. Allow students to explore the site then challenge students to create a presentation using Prezi, reviewed here, to explore issues related to media literacy.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

National Archives: The Digital Classroom - National Archives

Grades
4 to 8
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
This site is meant to assist teachers in their use of archival documents when teaching. Choose "Primary Sources and Activities" for reproducible primary documents, photographs, and...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This site is meant to assist teachers in their use of archival documents when teaching. Choose "Primary Sources and Activities" for reproducible primary documents, photographs, and lesson plans correlated to the National History Standards, and cross-curricular connections. The site includes interesting activities for use in studying events in U.S. History.

tag(s): media literacy (65), primary sources (93)

In the Classroom

This is an excellent site for any history, art history, or civics teacher attempting to put forth something more tangible for students to grasp. Click on "Images of the American Revolution," and open up the pictures on the interactive whiteboard or projector. Question students as to the meaning and context of the illustrations, to help them understand how images were used to convey certain meanings. Ask the students to create their own cartoons about something controversial in their town, or about the unit being studied, and encourage them to use some of the same subtle concepts the original illustrators did.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close