TeachersFirst's Climate Change Resources

Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections

This collection of resources about climate change is selected to help teachers and students learn about the short and long term impact of climate change. As students read and see images of climate change then, now, and in the future, they will gain a better understanding. Younger students may have more questions as you explore together. Use these resources with your students to find ways you all can make a difference. Use this opportunity to teach about persuasive writing (letters to the editor or government officials), careers in science, and more. 

 

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Emoji Science - GE and Bill Nye

Grades
6 to 12
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Emoji Science takes the simple and understandable world of emojis to explain complex science concepts. Explore the Emoji Table of Experiments to find videos (with special guests), do...more
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Emoji Science takes the simple and understandable world of emojis to explain complex science concepts. Explore the Emoji Table of Experiments to find videos (with special guests), do it yourself science experiments, and more. The broad range of topics includes content such as super materials, the human brain, and plants. Scroll down the homepage to find the link to Emoji Education that includes lesson plans aligned to standards. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): climate change (65), energy (203), human body (126), magnetism (37), solar energy (40), solar system (122)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free lesson plans available on Emoji Science. Enjoy exploring the site with students on an interactive whiteboard or allow them to explore on their own. Use this site to introduce science concepts in an entertaining way. At the end of your unit, have cooperative learning groups create podcasts demonstrating their understanding of one of the concepts. Use a site such as PodOmatic, reviewed here. Have students create a multimedia presentation of science topics using Voicethread, reviewed here. This site allows users to narrate a picture. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to be reproduced), and then narrate the photo as if it is a news report.

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Business Insider Science YouTube Channel - Business Insiders

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6 to 12
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Don't let the business in the name fool you, this YouTube channel is all about science! Watch videos with the latest news in science, space, and medicine with new content ...more
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Don't let the business in the name fool you, this YouTube channel is all about science! Watch videos with the latest news in science, space, and medicine with new content added each week. Scroll through the page to find the latest videos or explore playlists with topics such as Explainers and Psychology. Most videos run less than three minutes in length, making them perfect for a snack-sized bite of science information! If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): animals (290), brain (71), climate change (65), dinosaurs (57), drugs and alcohol (21), earth (231), human body (126), nutrition (158), planets (127), plants (155), scientists (70), space (217), STEM (151), weather (194)

In the Classroom

Share a video with students once a week to help all of you learn about the latest information from the world of science. Flip your classroom and use a video as homework. Have students take notes on the material and write down questions they still have and topics that confuse them. Or, use a tool like eduCanon, reviewed here, for students to pause videos and ask or answer questions right on the video. These activities can help uncover student misconceptions. Show the video to the class, and then discuss the concept at length.

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Filming a Beluga Whale - National Geographic

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3 to 12
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This YouTube video takes viewers behind the scenes to learn about filming Beluga Whales as they gather in Canada each summer. Although the video is quite short, there is extensive ...more
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This YouTube video takes viewers behind the scenes to learn about filming Beluga Whales as they gather in Canada each summer. Although the video is quite short, there is extensive information about the project included in the video summary. If your district blocks YouTube, then the video may not be viewable. You could always view the video at home and bring it to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the video from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): climate change (65), migration (59), oceans (154), whales (17)

In the Classroom

Share this video on an interactive whiteboard or projector, or ask students to watch at home as an introduction to a unit on ocean animals or climate change. Challenge students to research whales further and learn more about their migrations and interactions as a unit. Have students use Vibby, reviewed here, to grab more information from other YouTube videos to share with the class about whale behavior. Have students create maps using Animaps, reviewed here, to show locations of whales around the world and their migration patterns. Students can add text, images, and location stops with Animaps!

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GeoInquiries - ESRI

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4 to 12
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GeoInquiries offers standards-based collections for teaching map-based concepts. Choose from several different content topics such as Earth Science, US History, and more. Locate the...more
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GeoInquiries offers standards-based collections for teaching map-based concepts. Choose from several different content topics such as Earth Science, US History, and more. Locate the complete list of available collections on the left side of the homepage. After choosing a broad topic, select a specific activity, then click to open the PDF for easy access to content. In addition to the GeoInquiries, this site also includes several additional lengthier activities including all necessary teacher and student materials.

tag(s): agriculture (57), american revolution (89), civil war (145), climate change (65), cold war (29), demographics (19), earthquakes (50), landforms (46), maps (293), minerals (17), oceans (154), population (62), rocks (50), volcanoes (65), weather (194), world war 1 (53)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free lessons offered on GeoInquiries for use in your classroom. Divide students into groups to participate in different activities or use as enrichment for gifted students to complete independently. When finished with your inquiries, challenge students to create a presentation using Prezi, reviewed here, demonstrating information learned.
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It's Okay To Be Smart YouTube Channel - Joe Hanson

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6 to 12
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This YouTube Channel contains videos based on the PBS Series of the same name. You can also view the It's Okay To Be Smart blog reviewed here. New...more
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This YouTube Channel contains videos based on the PBS Series of the same name. You can also view the It's Okay To Be Smart blog reviewed here. New videos are uploaded weekly with titles such as "Why Seasons Make No Sense" and "How Big is the Solar System?" Most videos are under 10 minutes in length making them perfect for quick but meaningful lessons. Be sure to check out playlists with videos sorted by topics including physics, earth, and more. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): animals (290), climate change (65), earth (231), endangered species (39), energy (203), evolution (102), food chains (22), human body (126), space (217), video (274)

In the Classroom

Flip your classroom and use a video as homework. Have students take notes on the material and write down questions they still have and topics that confuse them. Or, use a tool like EdPuzzle, reviewed here, for students to pause videos and ask or answer questions right on the video. These activities can uncover misconceptions. Show the video to the class, and then discuss the concept at length. To share a single video from this site without all the YouTube clutter, use a tool such as SafeShareTV, reviewed here, and create a shortcut to the SafeShare page directly on the desktop. For more advanced classes, provide time for students to choose a video to view and research the underlying concept.

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World Affairs Council - Resources

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6 to 12
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The World Affairs Council (WAC) is online to help you understand global issues. Find free lesson plans and templates categorized by Comparative World Affairs, Conflict Analysis/Mapping,...more
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The World Affairs Council (WAC) is online to help you understand global issues. Find free lesson plans and templates categorized by Comparative World Affairs, Conflict Analysis/Mapping, Culture and Communication, Freedom of the Press, and Justice. You'll also find links to Other Materials and Webinars.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): africa (180), climate change (65), cross cultural understanding (117), ecology (135), foreign policy (16), germany (28), news (265), terrorism (49), terrorist (16)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of these free lesson plans and templates hosted by WAC. Use these in conjunction with their archive on YouTube for their weekly program World Affairs TODAY. Their YouTube channel contains various topics; some are specific such as Spying on Germany and Other Allies or Emerging Africa, and some are more general like global warming (or climate change) and the failure of the global economy.

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World Affairs Council - Washington, DC - World Affairs Council - Washington, DC

Grades
6 to 12
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In today's world, we need to understand and get involved in global issues. The World Affairs Council (WAC) is online to help you do that. Click on About Us to ...more
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In today's world, we need to understand and get involved in global issues. The World Affairs Council (WAC) is online to help you do that. Click on About Us to read the history of the World Affairs Council (WAC), find an explanation about their Global Education Program, information about their summer institute, and read about their Public Programs with the weekly national television program World Affairs TODAY; find out where to see the broadcast or get a link to the YouTube channel. There is a student section that describes their annual contest called WorldQuest. Explore the drop down menu tabs across the top and find free lesson plans and templates (under Resources), upcoming events, local WAC councils, and much more. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): africa (180), climate change (65), cross cultural understanding (117), ecology (135), foreign policy (16), germany (28), news (265), terrorism (49), terrorist (16)

In the Classroom

Thanks to instantaneous news shows and social media, the students of the 21st Century are very aware of global issues. That is not to say they understand them. Start a current events program in your class, you may want to look at Newsela, reviewed here, TweenTribune, reviewed here, or Flocabulary, reviewed here. Then turn to the World Affairs Council and their YouTube channel to get explanations about global issues. The topics are extensive; some are specific and some are more general like global warming (or climate change) and the failure of the global economy. All are current, and all will give your students a different perspective on the topic. With older students, each week you could put a different small group in charge of featuring a current event and ask them to research its history, and see if they can also find the topic on the WAC YouTube channel. Have those students create an annotated, narrated image including text boxes and related links using a multimedia tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here, to present to the class.
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Ice and Sky - Association Wild-Touch and Luc Jacquet

Grades
8 to 12
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Learn about the history of climate change through the scientific explorations of Claude Lorius. View the entire interactive as a slide show or use the menu to explore specific content...more
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Learn about the history of climate change through the scientific explorations of Claude Lorius. View the entire interactive as a slide show or use the menu to explore specific content such as Exploring Ancient Climates or Man Disrupts the Giants of Nature. The tutorial explains how to display and download related documents from the site. Add any screen to create a personalized lesson, or download and display documents from the Ice and Sky educational program. Downloads include videos and educational booklets. The site seems to work well on Chrome, and not as well on Safari.

tag(s): antarctica (29), climate change (65), slides (65), video (274), weather (194)

In the Classroom

Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students explore this site independently or in small groups. Challenge students to create a multimedia presentation on climate change using UTellStory, reviewed here. This tool allows for narrating and adding text to a picture. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to use), and then narrate the photo as if it is a news report. Have students create a map (choose locations, add text, images, and videos to demonstrate the effect of climate change) using Tour Builder, reviewed here. Have students use Bio Cube, reviewed here, to create a biography about Claude Lorius.

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Changing Planet - NBC Universal Media, LLC

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4 to 12
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Examine the effect of climate change on our planet through video on Changing Planet. NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation collaborated to create this collection. Topics range...more
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Examine the effect of climate change on our planet through video on Changing Planet. NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation collaborated to create this collection. Topics range from Thawing Permafrost, Melting Mountain Glaciers, Withering Crops, and more! Each video has a "cue card" with a summary and key terms. The videos are approximately five to ten minutes in length, and every video has a tab with a transcript that opens full-screen from the card view. Middle level and high school STEM lessons accompany most of the videos. The larger NBC Learn site is a fee-based subscription, but this section is free.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): arctic (45), climate change (65), diseases (70), glaciers (15), mountains (15), oceans (154), scientific method (67), statistics (124), STEM (151), temperature (31), trees (30), tundra (14), water (130)

In the Classroom

Place the URL to Changing Planet on your classroom website or blog for students to explore the videos on their own. Flip your instruction and assign the videos to your scientists to watch before class. Flipping will maximize classroom time. Encourage budding scientists to investigate climate change. Use this site as a springboard for individual or group projects that connect to our world today. Have students create presentations to share what they learned using a tool such as Powtoon, reviewed here. Build student's background knowledge by watching the videos, and reviewing nonfiction reading strategies with students before reading the transcripts. Use the videos on Changing Planet to help struggling readers with the content on the cue cards. Encourage your scientists to tackle the topic of climate for a science fair experiment or graduation project.
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A History of Poverty - Christian Aid

Grades
8 to 12
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Discover where poverty (and prosperity) have been most present over the past two hundred years through this interactive map. Explore global issues such as corruption, health, and inequalities...more
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Discover where poverty (and prosperity) have been most present over the past two hundred years through this interactive map. Explore global issues such as corruption, health, and inequalities through short videos. Use tools to zoom in on the map to view specific continents or zoom back out for a larger overview. Filters allow sorting views by continent and least and most developed countries. As the timeline progresses, read about important events impacting poverty, such as world wars and AIDS.

tag(s): climate change (65), disasters (39), diseases (70), nutrition (158)

In the Classroom

Share this map and the accompanying films on your interactive whiteboard as part of discussions on world economies, countries around the world, or changes during the past two hundred years across the globe. Allow students to explore on their own, then create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here or Venngage reviewed here.
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Interactives & Simulations: Weather, Climate & Atmosphere Education - UCAR Center for Science Education

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5 to 12
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This site provides a small, but worthwhile, selection of interactives and simulations related to the weather and climate. Choose from interesting activities such as launching a virtual...more
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This site provides a small, but worthwhile, selection of interactives and simulations related to the weather and climate. Choose from interesting activities such as launching a virtual balloon to examining layers of the earth's atmosphere, or "building" a tree using different climate options. Each activity includes a full explanation and many include additional links or extension activities.

tag(s): arctic (45), atmosphere (29), carbon dioxide (16), climate (92), climate change (65), hurricanes (40), solar energy (40), sun (72), trees (30)

In the Classroom

Introduce Interactives & Simulations on an interactive whiteboard or projector then allow students to explore on their own. Be sure to provide a link on your class website or blog for students to explore at home. Have students create an annotated image including text boxes and related links using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here, to demonstrate information learned from this site. Alternatively students could create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as Wordle, reviewed here, or WordItOut, reviewed here.
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Data - The World Bank - The World Bank Group

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5 to 12
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Just the facts and lots of them! The World Bank offers an extensive array of data about the countries of the world. Sort either by country (from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe) ...more
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Just the facts and lots of them! The World Bank offers an extensive array of data about the countries of the world. Sort either by country (from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe) or by topic (agriculture to urban development). Look at zoomable, color-coded maps, and analyze rankings by topic. The interface is simple and direct, so if you are just looking for a statistic, you will find it quickly and easily. If you are looking at masses of authentic data to analyze or compare, you'll find that too. Click to download data in several formats.

tag(s): agriculture (57), atlas (6), climate change (65), data (149), energy (203), environment (321), infographics (45), map skills (82), maps (293), natural resources (60), resources (112), united nations (8)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site for student research, whether it be for individual country data or for comparative data by topic. Use the maps on an interactive whiteboard (or projector) to provide a visual representation of the data. This is a great source for authentic data for students to practice their analytic skills, or just to find out what the GDP of Antigua and Barbuda is. This is a resource that will see frequent use. Share it during math units on data, as well, so students have authentic numbers to "play with." Have them write their own data problems and questions for classmates to solve. Challenge your most able student to determine why two countries are so different.

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Mosa Mack Science Detective - Lissa Johnson

Grades
5 to 9
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Mosa Mack Science is a web-based library of animated science mysteries with hands-on activities. All are aligned to Science standards. Each unit contains a short animated film, discussion...more
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Mosa Mack Science is a web-based library of animated science mysteries with hands-on activities. All are aligned to Science standards. Each unit contains a short animated film, discussion guides, and engineering design challenges in addition to the hands-on activities. Create your free account using email and a password to access the four free units with topics of photosynthesis, climate change, food webs, and diabetes.
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tag(s): climate change (65), food chains (22), photosynthesis (32), STEM (151)

In the Classroom

Download materials from Mosa Mack lessons to supplement your current teaching materials. View videos on your interactive whiteboard and post a link on your class website for students to view at home. If you have a flipped classroom, have students view videos before coming to class and beginning lessons. Use ideas from this site for science fairs and projects.
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Global Climate Change - NASA

Grades
3 to 12
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Find great background information on Climate Change with this site. Find up to date information about sea and land ice cover, amount of deforestation, carbon dioxide amounts in the...more
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Find great background information on Climate Change with this site. Find up to date information about sea and land ice cover, amount of deforestation, carbon dioxide amounts in the atmosphere, sea level rise, and more along the bottom. Scroll down to view News and Features, What is Climate Change (and find your answers to the Evidence, Causes, Effects, and Solutions), and explore interactives and other information.

tag(s): climate (92), climate change (65)

In the Classroom

Use this resource for some excellent background information on climate change. Create public service announcements outlining the key points from this site. Create a campaign for making small changes in our lives that can add up to a big difference. Assign small groups to explore one facet of this site and create a multimedia presentation using one of many TeachersFirst Edge tools reviewed here.
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Thematic Mapping Engine - Bjorn Sandvik

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6 to 12
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What is a .kmz file and how do you make one? A .kmz file, when opened, launches Google Earth and the files needed to view specific portions of the globe, ...more
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What is a .kmz file and how do you make one? A .kmz file, when opened, launches Google Earth and the files needed to view specific portions of the globe, map overlays, and other information. There are several ways to create a .kmz file to share with others for specific content to be learned. Thematic Mapping Engine provides you with a very simple way to create Google Earth .kmz files. This tool uses data from the United Nations to create maps of all types of development and environmental data. Follow the instructions in the yellow box along the right side of this tool. Select a statistical indicator category from the dropdown (for example, Life expectancy or population). Then, select a year or range of years, and the manner in which they would like the data displayed in Google Earth. Preview and download the .kmz file. Share this file on your blog, wiki, or web page. Click on and then download the file. Once the file is opened, Google Earth then opens and the data is seen within Google Earth. Note: Google Earth must be installed on student computers. Check with your technology department about the availability of Google Earth in your schools. See more information about Google Earth, reviewed here.

tag(s): climate change (65), diseases (70), earth (231), landmarks (27), news (265), population (62)

In the Classroom

Use this tool with Google Earth to discuss population changes, incidence of various diseases, or look at environmental data such as carbon dioxide emissions. Use this tool when discussing various countries and populations throughout the world, looking at the various factors that affect countries. Use this information to question the history and current state of various populations. Create more than one .kmz file to place on your class website. Provide time for student groups to look at one of the files and draw conclusions or report on their findings. Use class time to look at the information from all groups to obtain a snapshot of various regions, looking at populations, diseases, and more. For younger grades, use an interactive whiteboard or projector to show these files in Google Earth and compare what students know about the United States or other areas in unfamiliar countries. This tool would be perfect for gifted students to use to extend learning in a Science or History/World Cultures class to better understand the world around them.
 

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Eyes on the Earth - NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Grades
5 to 12
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Looking for views of orbiting satellites with actual data about the Earth? Find it here with the Eyes on the Earth tool. Note: This tool requires a one-time download. After ...more
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Looking for views of orbiting satellites with actual data about the Earth? Find it here with the Eyes on the Earth tool. Note: This tool requires a one-time download. After installing, launch from the web page (the install button turns into a start button). Be sure to view in full-screen mode for the best effect. Change your perspective of the Earth by changing the tilt (hold down the mouse and rotate). Zoom in and out with the tool along the right (much like the tool in Google Earth or Maps). Choose from among the tools along the top. As you click on a tool, read information in the window to the left. Be sure to click Turn Audio On to hear the narrative. Use the additional links there for more information. Visible Earth shows the movement of two satellites and the images from both. Choose the speed of the motion of the satellites with the slider along the bottom. Other tools include Temperature, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, Sea Level, Antarctic Zone, and Water and Ice. Click on the last two tools to view the actual datasets and missions. Some of the tools have relief maps, showing a 3D representation of the data. Click Show relief to really capture student attention. The tools in the lower right corner control the brightness of the image and full or partial screen.

tag(s): antarctica (29), arctic (45), carbon dioxide (16), climate (92), climate change (65), earth (231), glaciers (15), temperature (31), water (130)

In the Classroom

Be sure to share this tool using an interactive whiteboard or projector in the classroom. Provide a link to this tool on your website or bookmark on a class computer. Use this tool to introduce students to questioning and the scientific method. Why collect data on the Earth? Show a tool to the whole class or provide time for groups of students to view the visuals and develop questions and make observations. Challenge students to find answers to some of their questions. Help students figure out what they need to know to answer the questions. For a unit on the environment, begin the unit showing a few of the tools, namely the carbon dioxide and temperature tool. Compare two different tools side by side to note differences in patterns. For example, are the carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide patterns similar? Why or why not? Research the various gases, how they originate, and problems they cause in the atmosphere. Why is the carbon dioxide higher in some areas and not others? Research the carbon footprint of various regions and compare. Are those same areas showing the greatest or least effects of climate change? When discussing technology, view the different missions featured in this tool and the various engineering feats needed to accomplish these missions. Provide time for students to propose a "fantasy" mission for NASA. What should be measured, what would you call the mission? What kind of data would need to be collected? How do you think the Earth image data would look? Draft the proposal and create the possible image for review. Note: Students can focus on biological, chemical, or physical data for their proposal.

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The Carbon Cycle Game - Windows2Universe

Grades
7 to 12
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To better understand climate change, follow a carbon atom through organisms, the Earth, and the atmosphere. As you go through the interactive, choose the next step for the carbon atom....more
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To better understand climate change, follow a carbon atom through organisms, the Earth, and the atmosphere. As you go through the interactive, choose the next step for the carbon atom. Read the information about how the carbon atom gets there and its various interactions through nature. Be sure to click on For Teachers to find outcomes, standards, background information, best practices for using the interactive, and extension activities.
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tag(s): carbon (21), carbon dioxide (16), carbon footprint (11), climate (92), climate change (65), fossil fuels (18)

In the Classroom

Follow the terrific directions in the For Teachers section including items students should record as they work through the interactive. Review the assessment and extension activities for outstanding ideas. Encourage students to create a paragraph of the journey of their carbon atom or a concept map outlining the stops and science behind the journey. Find many excellent concept mapping tools here. Research climate change and ways to reduce the amount of carbon at specific steps. Research and present to the class various energy alternatives and ways to reduce carbon released into the atmosphere. Identify the carbon footprint of different countries and identify ways to reduce this footprint. Create a public service announcement to raise awareness of small changes everyone can do.
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ABC Splash - ABC TV and Radio Australia

Grades
K to 10
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ABC Splash is a large educational website from Australia containing videos, games, and audio clips. Special sections for parents include informational articles, teaching resources,...more
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ABC Splash is a large educational website from Australia containing videos, games, and audio clips. Special sections for parents include informational articles, teaching resources, and education news. Choose from primary or secondary level to view offerings sorted into categories or go to games and sort by topic or grade level to find resources. Register on the site to store and save favorite activities for later use. The site was created in the Australia, so some of the pronunciations and spellings may differ from those in American English.

tag(s): addition (239), animals (290), antarctica (29), atmosphere (29), australia (35), cells (104), climate change (65), continents (49), counting (120), decimals (132), division (169), earth (231), earthquakes (50), ecosystems (89), egypt (70), energy (203), environment (321), food chains (22), forces (45), forensics (27), fossil fuels (18), game based learning (113), gold rush (19), human body (126), immigration (58), insects (71), light (49), maps (293), molecules (44), money (190), multiplication (222), nuclear energy (24), nutrition (158), oceans (154), parts of speech (67), percent (83), perimeter (30), place value (56), plants (155), probability (131), rhymes (32), rocks (50), songs (53), sound (105), subtraction (199), time (140), vietnam (36), volcanoes (65), weather (194), whole numbers (17), world war 1 (53), world war 2 (142)

In the Classroom

This site is excellent for enrichment. Include it on your class web page for students to access both in and out of class. Share this link on your class web page and/or in a parent newsletter for help with homework and school projects. These high-quality media resources will engage your students and enhance their learning.
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National Geographic Education - National Geographic

Grades
K to 12
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National Geographic offers a rich and extensive site for educators through its Education homepage. Scroll through the toolbar near the top of the page to find resources, reference materials,...more
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National Geographic offers a rich and extensive site for educators through its Education homepage. Scroll through the toolbar near the top of the page to find resources, reference materials, maps, media, collections, and much more. Scroll to the bottom of the page to find what is most popular. For specific content searches use the search bar to find and filter results by grades, subjects, resource type, and audience. A download is also available for iBooks (Apple only). This site is frequently updated. Check back often!

tag(s): animals (290), climate change (65), commoncore (96), earth day (112), ecology (135), energy (203), food chains (22), map skills (82), maps (293), migration (59), multimedia (64), oceans (154), STEM (151), weather (194)

In the Classroom

Be sure to bookmark (or favorite) this site for use throughout the year to find real-world resources for classroom use. Don't forget to look for materials on National Geographic for use with Earth Day and Arbor Day activities! Differentiate easily using the multiple levels of materials found within National Geographic. Some text portions are challenging, so you should pair weaker readers with a partner as they research on this site. Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here, or Venngage, reviewed here. Have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as Wordle, reviewed here, or WordItOut, reviewed here. If you use Apple products in your classroom, be sure to download the interactive iBooks for use in classroom centers or independent reading.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Climate Time Machine - NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory/CIT

Grades
4 to 12
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Is there a climate change? What conditions on the Earth have changed over time? Find answers to these questions and more with this free tool. Choose from the following in ...more
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Is there a climate change? What conditions on the Earth have changed over time? Find answers to these questions and more with this free tool. Choose from the following in the menu bar: Sea Ice, Sea Level, Carbon Emissions, and Average Global Temperature. Drag the slider to show the differences in each of the four areas from 1884 to 2013. Read an explanation of consequences of these changes below the slider.

tag(s): antarctica (29), arctic (45), carbon dioxide (16), carbon footprint (11), climate (92), climate change (65), temperature (31)

In the Classroom

Want to get students attention? Begin with the Average Global Temperature on an Interactive Whiteboard or projector. Start the slider slowly at 1884 and be sure to pause and back up when global temperatures become cooler. However, be sure to point out to students that even though temperatures cycle a bit through time, as you progress to present day, much warmer temperatures persist. Follow this demonstration. How does this visualization compare to Carbon Emissions? Spend time in class looking at the Sea Level changes and list the areas that will be affected the most because of sea level rise. Create reports or posters about the various facts about those areas (populations, points of interest, culture, and history) to understand what will be lost. Have students create online posters individually or together as a class using a tool such as Web Poster Wizard (reviewed here) or PicLits (reviewed here. Create a campaign for halting climate change beginning with simple actions that EVERYONE can make. Take time to determine each student's carbon footprint and changes that matter.
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