TeachersFirst's Editors' Choice Poetry Month

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This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected by our editors from the hundreds of reviewed poetry resources and creative tools listed on TeachersFirst. Now April can be Poetry Month in any classroom. Even if you teach science or math, there is a place for poetry in your curriculum. Poetry is as brief and economical as a number sentence, but with feelings or messages between the words. Why not throw some poetry lines amid your chemical or algebraic equations to connect with verbal/linguistic learners and spark a new way of seeing any subject? Take time to plan a "poetry break" using these ideas from the TeachersFirst Editors.

Here are some poetic possibilities to get your students' creative juices flowing: Have students compose a limerick explaining a science term or historic figure. Have students collect a list of words from your current unit. Then offer extra credit for a poetic interpretation to be shared as a daily "poetry break" during April. Use one of the tools featured here to share poetic visions of biology, geometry, and more during April. Cover a classroom wall with white paper for "curriculum poetry" during April: encourage students to share poetry graffiti (classroom appropriate, of course).
Need other poetic ideas? Check out our "In the classroom suggestions" included in these reviews or try our keyword search for poetry AND a specific topic or grade level.

 

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Poetry Idea Engine - Scholastic

Grades
K to 6
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The site gives the basics for understanding haiku, limerick, cinquain, and free verse. Detailed steps lead you to an understanding of the poetry form. Following instruction, you see...more
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The site gives the basics for understanding haiku, limerick, cinquain, and free verse. Detailed steps lead you to an understanding of the poetry form. Following instruction, you see examples demonstrating each type of poetry. Scaffolded support helps you to achieve success in poetry. You can print your finished poem.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Use the Poetry Idea Engine as a starting point to introduce the different poetry forms. Extend this further into creating poetry with other subjects in the given form. Start your own classroom collection to be shared digitally on your website with Power Points or multimedia presentations. In audio form, create podcasts using a site such as PodOmatic (reviewed here) and then share them on your website. Add digital images and make a photo book of your favorite poems from your poetry unit using a site such as Mix Book (reviewed here). Save the poetry images/audio for your end of year remembrances to share with students and their families. The Poetry Idea Engine can provide concrete examples and success for ESL/ELL students as well as inspiration for gifted students.
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Poem Flow - Apple

Grades
4 to 12
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Since February 1, 2010, poetry.org has been adding one poem a day to display in Poem Flow. The poems appear line by line (on a cell phone background) in a ...more
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Since February 1, 2010, poetry.org has been adding one poem a day to display in Poem Flow. The poems appear line by line (on a cell phone background) in a fairly slow cadence so that each word of the poem can be appreciated. The poems are mainly classics by renowned authors. They begin as early as the 1500's with Shakespeare and continue through lesser known contemporary poets of 2010. The date of the poem's publication is included with the title. Students or teachers can choose to read the poem all at one time in full text as well. Designed to be used as an APP on the iPhone/iTouch, the website allows anyone (without an iPhone) to see the poems appearing slowly and thoughtfully.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Share a poem a day on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Have students participate in a poetry wiki to share their thoughts on the daily poem or write their own responses in student blogs. Not comfortable with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out theTeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through. Use this site to get your students' eyes on a poem. As they anticipate what is coming, they will all be at attention. Use the daily offering at "poetry break" time every day so the students can anticipate and look forward to each new poem!
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Poem in Your Pocket - Michael Bloomberg

Grades
5 to 12
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Poem in Your Pocket is a site dedicated to the annual Poem in Your Pocket Day in April and hosted by New York City for the past several years. The ...more
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Poem in Your Pocket is a site dedicated to the annual Poem in Your Pocket Day in April and hosted by New York City for the past several years. The website provides background information about the day and ways to participate. A variety of unique activities, lessons, and ideas will help bring poetry to classrooms and schools.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Go through this site with students and then have students read the suggestions for students under the curriculum ideas section. Have students create a plan of action for celebrating Poem in Your Pocket Day for your class or school. Students can present their ideas using a multimedia presentation. Have your students create an interactive online poster ("glog") using Glogster EDU, reviewed here.

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PS4K - Mark C. Bird

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3 to 12
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Poems and Stories for Kids, created by poet Mark C. Bird, offers collections of poems that speak to kids and focus on relevant themes like holidays, family, being picked last, ...more
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Poems and Stories for Kids, created by poet Mark C. Bird, offers collections of poems that speak to kids and focus on relevant themes like holidays, family, being picked last, and bullies. While Bird's poetry speaks to kids, you will want to be selective in using his poems due to some sensitive issues. Students can also send in their own work and blog with Mark Bird.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Select one or two poems to share with students using an interactive whiteboard or document camera. After discussing the poems, have students come up with questions for the poet. Post the questions on the blog. Or have students create an online poetry poster using Glogster EDU, reviewed here and list their questions. Leave the URL to your poster on his blog. It is sure to get his attention!
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Lulu Poetry - LLEI Inc

Grades
6 to 12
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Lulu Poetry is a place for poets of various ages to connect with others and receive reviews and feedback on their poetry. The site offers a section about great poets ...more
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Lulu Poetry is a place for poets of various ages to connect with others and receive reviews and feedback on their poetry. The site offers a section about great poets and poems in addition to access to resources and reference materials like a rhyming dictionary and a glossary of poetry terms to help compose poetry. This site also offers free poetry contests. Be sure to double check your district's policy on students publishing and posting poems to this website.

To enter poems, students must be registered users (email and password are required). Tip: rather than using your personal or work email, create a free Gmail account to use for memberships. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service.

tag(s): biographies (85), poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Students can use the rhyming dictionary when writing poems. This would also be a great site to discuss the idea of great poetry. The site lists great poets and poems, which would help incite a discussion on what makes a great poet or poem. Have students select one of the best poems and present it to the class using an interactive whiteboard or document camera. Students can share why they agree or disagree with its status as a great poem. Why not have students read their favorite poem (and offer their own opinions) on a podcast using a site such as PodOmatic (reviewed here).

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Poetry Everywhere - WGBH and David Grubin Productions

Grades
3 to 12
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Poetry Everywhere includes a mini biography on numerous poets followed by one of the poet's poems. Be sure to select poets and poems that are age appropriate for students. ...more
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Poetry Everywhere includes a mini biography on numerous poets followed by one of the poet's poems. Be sure to select poets and poems that are age appropriate for students.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Share several poems with students and then have them create similar poet and poem podcasts using a site such as PodOmatic (reviewed here) to present to their classmates. Post the podcasts to a class wikispace or website. Not familiar with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through.

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Poetry Teachers - Meadowbrook Press

Grades
K to 6
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Poetry Teachers aims to assist teachers in teaching poetry. The section entitled Poetry Fun provides students with engaging activities like tongue twisters and fill in...more
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Poetry Teachers aims to assist teachers in teaching poetry. The section entitled Poetry Fun provides students with engaging activities like tongue twisters and fill in the blank poems. Poetry Class includes lesson plans to help teachers with different poetry forms. The Poetry Theatre section provides teachers and students with poems and ideas on how to present poetry in a theatrical way.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Small groups of students can use the Poetry Theatre section to put together a theatrical presentation of poems. Film the presentations and share them using a tool such as SchoolTube reviewed here. Post them onto a class wiki. Not familiar with wikis? Have no wiki worries,'€ check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through.

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DigiPoem - Jon Elliott

Grades
4 to 12
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This site is pure fun! It quickly generates visual representations of poetry and other text sources. Students click on the Text tab and type their poems into the interactive text ...more
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This site is pure fun! It quickly generates visual representations of poetry and other text sources. Students click on the Text tab and type their poems into the interactive text box. When the poem is complete, click on submit, and a variety of images appears beside each word. You can keep clicking on the spinning arrow until you find the image that conveys your thoughts. Another feature is provided by clicking on the Poetry tab to access a short list of well-known poems accompanied by a visual display of the words, or do the same for the Random Haiku or Lyrics tab. Please be patient when poems are loading; they can take a few moments.

There is an option to email your digipoem, but first remember to check your school's policy or have students email their poems to your school email address. There is also a link to convert the text to an XML file that can be saved. JavaScript must be enabled in your browser for anything to work. The best feature of this site: no registration required!

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Delight your students by projecting digipoemon your classroom projector or interactive whiteboard to demonstrate how the words in poems create visual images. Then, be amazed at how quickly this will motivate them to write poetry. Take them to the computer lab or use a class set of lap tops, and put a link to this site on your class web page. Younger students should first type their poems into a Word document with a built in spell check, and then copy and paste them into the website's text box.
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Rhyme Brain - Steve Hanov

Grades
4 to 12
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This dynamite site makes rhyming alright. Save it as a favorite quick pick to have a slick trick for poets to click. The process is simple; just type in a ...more
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This dynamite site makes rhyming alright. Save it as a favorite quick pick to have a slick trick for poets to click. The process is simple; just type in a word and RhymeBrain finds ones that sound similar and sorts them so that the best rhymes appear first. You can also click to alliterate. Some of the choices are a bit of a stretch, so take what it reveals and appeals, without any waste-of-time ordeals. Some of your advanced poetry writers have the options of not only clicking on the link for instantaneously generating a list of rhymes, they can type in two words and then click on alliteration for another organized list. Sophisticated, witty language users may also have fun with the Insult button, which is similar to the British humor of rhyming Cockney slang.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Demonstrate how simple it is to find a word that rhymes on your projector or interactive whiteboard and then, provide a link to Rhyme Brain on your class web page for your students to have easy access to this tool. Have your students share their created poems on an interactive online poster ("glog") using Glogster EDU, reviewed here.

It's a real time saver. Use it to fascinate elementary students with the numerous single and multi-syllabic rhyming words and various spelling combinations that are generated. Older students will enjoy the play on words that it quickly reveals, saving them time to do the higher level thinking that the figurative language of poetry requires.
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For Better for Verse - Herbert Tucker, John C. Coleman: Professor of English

Grades
10 to 12
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For Better for Verse is an interactive learning tool that can help you understand what makes metered poetry in English tick. Think of it as a tutorial for sophisticated poetry...more
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For Better for Verse is an interactive learning tool that can help you understand what makes metered poetry in English tick. Think of it as a tutorial for sophisticated poetry analysis involving meter, rhythm, voice, prosody, and complex stress and foot patterns that challenge beyond appreciation of the poem to illuminate the life in it. The tools are composed of a List of Poems, a Poem Workbox, a Glossary, and the Resources tab, where you will find a short scholarly bibliography and selected audio clips. There is also an extensive Help page for guidance. High school English, honors, and advanced placement courses will welcome this site.

tag(s): poetry (229), stress (14)

In the Classroom

Plotting the patterns of poetic meter and rhyme can be as hard to study as learning a foreign language. It takes long hours of practice to develop an ear and a feel for the kind of verse that was standard during Chaucer's time. At For Better for Verse poetry enthusiasts practice by trial and error opportunities, and receive instant feedback as they analyze the syllables' stress, without becoming too stressed, themselves. How do you know where the slacks and stresses fall? You listen; so instead of relying on repeating the verse out loud, click on the audio to hear it read. Listening to a vocal performance is helpful in the early stages of the tutorial. Students build confidence as they turn their stride into a gallop and waltz across the poem with their mouse and curser. Soon they will progress to using their eyes, rather than their ears to "listen" to the poem.
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Newspaper Blackout - Austin Kleon

Grades
4 to 12
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Newspaper Blackout is a clever way to unlock the secret poetry hidden within any printed page. This Tumblr site shares examples (unmoderated, so preview before sharing in a classroom!)....more
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Newspaper Blackout is a clever way to unlock the secret poetry hidden within any printed page. This Tumblr site shares examples (unmoderated, so preview before sharing in a classroom!). Poetry no longer needs to be a gray area; this activity makes it black and white! There are no gimmicks, no magic pens, and no camouflage paper, but this is certainly a tricky way to write a poem! All you need are newspapers and black markers. Hunt for and select a few words from each of the lines as you read a newspaper or magazine article. Remember to start with the title. Instead of the typical bottom-up approach to writing a poem by starting with a blank page and filling it with words, try this fresh, top down approach by starting with a page already crowded with words. Then use permanent markers to blacken out all the trivial words in each line until the poem appears. (Put something under your page so the ink does not bleed through on furniture!) Click Share your poem to learn how to upload your work to the site.

tag(s): creative writing (167)

In the Classroom

This poetry activity opens the doors to so many learning objectives. In a social studies or history classroom, you could direct your students to search for newspaper or magazine articles on topics that you have been studying, or current events. Suddenly you have social studies poetry! In an English language arts lesson, you might instruct students to blacken out all the words that are not nouns or verbs, or select other parts of speech. You could change the task to eliminate any word that is not part of the simple subject or predicate, and simultaneously teach or reinforce main idea. For classrooms with individual computers, students could access articles online. Copy the text into a document. Then, Instead of blackening out words with markers, they could get the same effect by highlighting over them with black, or changing the font color of the text to white, and printing them or saving a screenshot image. Another option is for students to email their Newspaper Blackout poems to the teacher. Each poem could then be put into a Power Point slide show for the class to see on a projector or interactive whiteboard. Use this site to offer your students a new twist on Poetry Month (April). Take your new poetry collection to the world by uploading the PowerPoint to ThingLink, reviewed here, and having each student record a reading in his/her own voice. Make poetry a participatory experience, no matter what the subject. If your school permits, have students take photos of their paper poems -- or screenshots of ones done on the computer --and share them on this site.

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Poetry Read-a-Thon - Academy of American Poets

Grades
5 to 12
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The goal of the Poetry Read-a-Thon is to have students read and write about poetry. Students are asked to choose a poem and then write a 75-100 word response to ...more
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The goal of the Poetry Read-a-Thon is to have students read and write about poetry. Students are asked to choose a poem and then write a 75-100 word response to the poem. The response should focus on one or two of the following categories: images of the poem, sounds of the poem, subject(s) of the poem, emotional effect(s) of the poem, the poem's meaning(s), questions about the poem, or questions the student would like to ask, if he/she could speak to the poet.

tag(s): creative writing (167), poetry (229), writing (355)

In the Classroom

This is a great way to introduce a poetry unit to a class. It is also ideal for Poetry Month (April). This read-a-thon can also be used throughout the entire semester. A teacher guide is included as well as a student log. If used throughout the semester, teachers can start out each lesson period with one or two students sharing their responses with the class. Teachers can also choose a poem and assign students a particular response focus. Students can then compare and contrast each other's responses to the same poem. Have cooperative learning groups share their poems on a podcast using PodOmatic (reviewed here).
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The Poetry Archive - The Poetry Archive Panel

Grades
K to 12
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The Poetry Archive is a comprehensive place for bringing poetry to life in your classroom. This resource provides lesson plans and activities for all key stages, built around authentic...more
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The Poetry Archive is a comprehensive place for bringing poetry to life in your classroom. This resource provides lesson plans and activities for all key stages, built around authentic recordings that offer lively, engaging ways of unraveling the mystery of poetry. There are numerous internet sites that provide audio versions of poems; however this site provides access to the actual voice of the poets as they read their poems the way they intended them to be heard. Find out what they say about their own writing and the importance of hearing poems aloud. Browse all poems by title, poet's name, poetic forms, or themes. A full glossary of poetic terms is provided. There are various featured poets in residence, and there is even a link to a Children's Archive with favorite poems for younger students. The Poetry Archive includes a wide range of resources designed to help students learn background information on the poets and understand the context for their work.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Enrich and enliven your poetry lessons with recordings and videos of some of the world's best loved poets. One of teachers many frustrations, when trying to inspire students to fall in love with poetry, is not being able to call up the voices of earlier poets. Listening to the poet himself has a magical effect in the classroom and makes the very experience that it describes come alive. Start by projecting the poem on your white board while listening to the recording and then ask students to pick out, highlight, and display words or phrases that appealed to them. Introduce various poetic forms and demonstrate how the sound of a poem is as crucial to its meaning as the printed words on the page. Explore, connect, and make new discoveries for themes you are studying. Have students respond to the power and energy of poetic language and appreciate the beauty of the sounds and images, then move towards an analysis of the underlying meaning. Challenge students to try some creative writing that goes beyond the literal meaning and resonates their "voice." Not studying poetry during April (Poetry Month)? Play a quick Poetry Break from this site as a class starter or bonus moment after finishing a quiz. Make your own class poetry archive by having students upload PowerPoint images of their own poems and read them aloud on UtellStory, reviewed here.
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Poems = Word Comics - Austin Kleon

Grades
6 to 12
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Poems = Word Comics is the perfect venue to view poetry in an entirely new way and hook your students into creating poems. You won't hear any more moans and ...more
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Poems = Word Comics is the perfect venue to view poetry in an entirely new way and hook your students into creating poems. You won't hear any more moans and groans when you mention poetry workshop time. Many poems are like word comics, in that they jump from one image to another in a short amount of lines. Transform your poets into cartoonists by creating a comic strip of images on a page and using the artwork to propel text to convey a message. After all, communication is an art. Be careful, it may become addicting!

tag(s): creative writing (167), poetry (229), writing (355)

In the Classroom

Visual thinkers sometimes experience difficulty expressing their thoughts in words and when asked to write a poem, they literally fall apart. Poetry has images inherent in its form; therefore, spark your students' creativity by enabling them to think of a line in a poem as a frame in a cartoon. By jumping from image to image, the poem takes on a comic-like element, where the words and images are dependent upon each other. Rather than getting jammed up on words that rhyme, this approach offers a clever and amazing way to "write a poem." This activity would work well for pairing visual learners or artistically inclined students with the stronger writers in the class, or by using individual computers to combine the Poems = Word Comics concept with The Comic Creator, reviewed here, to create professional looking poetic comics.
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Twiducate - Twiducate

Grades
2 to 12
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Looking for a microblogging (think twitter) alternative for collaboration or networking in your classes? Use Twiducate to create a microblogging platform for the students in your classes...more
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Looking for a microblogging (think twitter) alternative for collaboration or networking in your classes? Use Twiducate to create a microblogging platform for the students in your classes without venturing into the more complex public interactions of Twitter. Maintain privacy and a safe structure for collaborative learning. Post questions to elicit responses or use the safe environment for students to receive feedback on works in progress. Not sure about this resource? Twiducate was created by a group of teachers in Southwest Ontario to provide this type of service to students and teachers.

tag(s): microblogging (44), social networking (112), twitter (51)

In the Classroom

Create an account easily with information about your school and title. Though an email is required, create your account without email verification. Make a class name and code that students can use for Twiducate. Manage many options through your home page including adding students, entering bookmarks to share with students, viewing the public timeline (you may find a teacher to collaborate and share with,) and create more classes. Students do not need to register themselves and are added in through the teacher. As students are added, a password is generated for them.

Use this safe, private, closed system to blog and network in your classes. Students are able to access this site outside of school and collaborate there as well. Invite parents into this network and let them see what is going on. Teachers are able to moderate all posts and remove any unwanted posts. Consider printing the screen of student names and passwords for a hard copy in order to access the information. Be sure to discuss rules of etiquette for posting and commenting in order to teach students effective use of these types of services. Be sure to include actions for broken rules. Check your school policies about using such a resource and whether special permission slips may be required.

The possibilities are endless. Use for posting homework assignments. Share and publish bookmarks for students to use. Respond to students trying to get test dates and other assignments changed! Collaborate among small or large groups. Create study groups for review and learning of information. Use small time information gathering more effectively: Assign every two students a concept to research and share learning with the rest of the class for discussion. How can you be sure that each student has completed work? Have them blog their information through Twiducate. Each group would have a specific key word that they use at the start of their posts. Search for a keyword at the top of the screen to bring up all those related posts! Watching a movie that requires students to answer questions? Post prepared questions throughout the movie to elicit responses from students. Allow students the ability to blog their reactions to documentaries and work together for understanding. During poetry month, have student do oral poetry reading while others microblog their reactions to the poem as they listen. Share weekly links and comments about current events via microblog. If you are willing to risk it invite students to microblog questions and reactions to teacher and student presentations in progress. Suddenly listening is an active endeavor! Provide this resource for groups to collaborate in and out of class and offer options for learning at any time.

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Word It Out - Worditout.com

Grades
2 to 12
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Create impressive word clouds from any text! What is a word cloud? Word clouds show not only the words in the text sample, but also display the frequency of the ...more
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Create impressive word clouds from any text! What is a word cloud? Word clouds show not only the words in the text sample, but also display the frequency of the words by showing often used words in a larger font. No login or registration required. Click "Create a word cloud," enter or paste your text and then click "word it out." View your word cloud, drag the arrows on the sides of the screen to make larger or smaller, and change the colors and specifics of the word cloud in the space below. Click "Save" to save as either public or private (an email address is required to save.)

tag(s): visualizations (14), vocabulary (323), word choice (26), word clouds (10), word study (80)

In the Classroom

You need to know how to copy/paste text passages (ctrl or command + C, then ctrl or command + V to paste. Think Velcro to stick it there!). If you wish to Save, you must join the site (email required). Alternately, capture the image using screen capture (apple/shift/4 on a Mac or Print Screen on a PC.)

Use a word cloud in virtually any class. With emergent readers, enter multiple words with the same consonant cluster or vowel sound, so they can SEE a visual grouping of that sound on your interactive whiteboard and guess the sound. Project a teacher-created word cloud at the start of a new lesson or unit and have students determine what the lesson will be about. Have students use word clouds to proof their own essays or stories. Use word clouds for students to identify the subject and frequently used words to check if they are on target with their intended message. Have students find overused words in their own writing as part of lessons on word choice. Teachers could create and save a word cloud then share it as a visual prompt for students to work individually or in groups to identify words they know (and the definitions) as well as the words they are unfamiliar with. Create word clouds of passages or stories and allow students to guess the author, title, subject, or meaning of the story. Underscore motifs in literature by creating clouds of passages, especially poetry. Have students work together to make clouds of alternative ways to say "said" or "went" in story-writing to post in your classroom as a reference. Create word clouds of opinion passages to determine the bias of the author and possible reasons for that specific opinion. Make word cloud posters on health topics such as the potential health risks of smoking. Make word clouds of different food groups. Create higher order thinking activities by approaching text in a unique way.

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Write Rhymes - Matthew Healy

Grades
1 to 12
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Need a rhyming word for those lyrics or poems? Simply type in your poem at this site. When a rhyme is needed, hold the Alt or Option (MAC) key over ...more
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Need a rhyming word for those lyrics or poems? Simply type in your poem at this site. When a rhyme is needed, hold the Alt or Option (MAC) key over the word and click on the specific word that you want to rhyme, and a window of rhyme possibilities appears. Students may print their poetry, or, they may opt to save their typed creations to their own Word files. The site is simple, but it sure beats digging through a rhyming dictionary. Some of the words are difficult to read due to the background graphics.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Demonstrate this site having volunteers share their poetry on your interactive whiteboard or projector. For advanced poets studying meter, discussing the multiple syllable options makes the task easier. You can also use this site as you teach common letter combinations and sounds with beginning readers. Enter a simple word such as "fish" or "bat" and Alt-click or Option-click for dozens of rhyming words to read aloud with a small group at your interactive whiteboard.

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Festisite - IntenCT

Grades
4 to 12
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This site contains a plethora of user-generated poems, tools for making poetry writing simple, opportunities to make comments on the poetry of others and also to submit one's own poetry....more
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This site contains a plethora of user-generated poems, tools for making poetry writing simple, opportunities to make comments on the poetry of others and also to submit one's own poetry. Students and teachers can search for poems by looking at those that have come in most recently, or by searching by categories, called "Tags." To search using this option, you must click on the "poems" tab at the top of the site. Be sure to know your school's policy on having students submit their work before allowing your students to share their poetry. Avid poetry lovers can also subscribe to poetry feeds using this site.

tag(s): poetry (229), writing (355)

In the Classroom

Use this site to show your students that anyone can become a poet when they balk at reading poetry. Share some of the poetry on your projector or interactive whiteboard. Read some of your required poems and then look at the "Tags" and ask your students to decide where poetry written by others should be placed. Go on to ask them if they can think of other Tags to add. Since many of the poems here have holiday themes, use this as a quick activity before a holiday or to encourage students to reflect on family holiday traditions. ESL/ELL students will not have to worry so much about their grammar when embarking on poetry writing! They'll love to be thought creative. If you are permitted to "publish" your students' poetry, why not go one step further and have them narrate a picture using the words from their poem at a site such as ThingLink reviewed here. Or have students share their poems using a podcasting site such as PodOmatic (reviewed here).

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It's Fun To Read - Poetry - Starfall Education

Grades
K to 2
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Beginning readers will be delighted to read these four adorable poems entitled "If I Could Touch the Sky," "My Hiding Place," "My Shadow," and "Who Has Seen the Wind?" Every ...more
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Beginning readers will be delighted to read these four adorable poems entitled "If I Could Touch the Sky," "My Hiding Place," "My Shadow," and "Who Has Seen the Wind?" Every student will find something to relate to within these poems. Students can differentiate the activity by either reading the poem independently or clicking on the sound icon (ear) to have the poem read to them. Each poem provides a list of high frequency words or "unique" words at the bottom of the web page as well as a writing extension page.

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

Share the poetry on your projector or interactive whiteboard. If individual computers are available, even better! Just be sure to remember the headsets! Maybe consider creating a "Poetry Station" using this site on a computer cluster.

Review corresponding high frequency words with students prior to reading the poems. Have students search for those words throughout the poem. Incorporate some of the words onto the classroom word wall or point out existing words on the wall as a connection activity to the literature. Students can complete the extension print out activity as a center assignment and proceed to publish it with illustrations.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Shmoop Poetry (beta) - Shmoop University Inc.

Grades
6 to 12
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As a companion piece to the Shmoop literature site, this is a wonderful addition if you teach poetry. Shmoop provides students (and teachers) with so much more than summaries. This...more
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As a companion piece to the Shmoop literature site, this is a wonderful addition if you teach poetry. Shmoop provides students (and teachers) with so much more than summaries. This is a great site with a unique voice. It is written by Ph.D. and Masters students at top universities (such as Harvard, Yale, Stanford, etc.). While the list of poems is currently growing (this is a beta site), it includes many of the poems and/or poets commonly studied in high school including some of Shakespeare's sonnets, Whitman, Coleridge, Shelley, Dickinson, Browning, Rich, Yeats, and others. Especially appealing are the "Intro" sections, which tell the background of the poem. This should interest students as it places a very human "face" on the poem and sets it in context for them. Besides summaries, techniques, quotes, and study questions, this site also gives a "did you know?" page that includes random trivia about the poet, poem, or topic, as well as a "sex rating" ("Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is rated "G"). This in itself will amuse students-- and amused students are likely to stay focused!

In addition to the literary content, there are also photo slideshows that accompany the poems and their authors. The slideshows would be great for readers who may need some assistance in comprehension, or may just need to something to sell the content and heighten their interest. While actually signing up (which is free) gives you the ability to "clip" files and keep them in a folder, you can access the majority of the information without signing up. Registration does require an email address. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service.

Be aware this site is still in beta. The content is frequently updated, so be sure to check back!

tag(s): poetry (229)

In the Classroom

There are many possibilities at this website. Use it for reference, share the highlights on your interactive whiteboard or projector, or talk about the constructive use of a site like this without plagiarizing. One activity after reviewing a poem through Shmoop's process might be to have students use a poem not included on Shmoop and make their own entry for it, following the Shmoop template as an example. Why not make your own wiki to include some of the same features for other poems? Not comfortable with wikis? Check out the TeachersFirst Wiki Walk-Through. Note: one popular poem on Shmoop is Poe's "The Raven." Be sure to have students explore TeachersFirst's interactive Raven as yet another rich way to experience the poem along with Shmoop.

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