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Civil Rights Movement Interactive Map - NewseumEd

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8 to 12
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This interactive map includes links to newspaper coverage of civil rights stories from around the nation beginning with 1954 through 1965. Choose any year to view several front pages...more
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This interactive map includes links to newspaper coverage of civil rights stories from around the nation beginning with 1954 through 1965. Choose any year to view several front pages with coverage of major events. Read each front page by clicking "view larger image". For additional information on similar topics, scroll to the bottom of the page to find links to more artifacts.

tag(s): black history (59), civil rights (117), newspapers (94)

In the Classroom

Share a link to this site on your class website and allow students to explore on their own. Discuss their findings and interpretations of media coverage of civil rights events in class. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast media coverage in two different cities. Ask students to investigate newspapers from additional locations, then create a presentation sharing their findings using Prezi, reviewed here.

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Making a Change: The First Amendment and the Civil Rights Movement - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Explore how the First Amendment influenced the Civil Rights Movement through this collection of resources from Newseum. The collection includes three teaching units with topics of Historical...more
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Explore how the First Amendment influenced the Civil Rights Movement through this collection of resources from Newseum. The collection includes three teaching units with topics of Historical Connections, Media Literacy, and Civics & Citizenship. In addition, an interactive timeline beginning in 1791 demonstrates the Civil Rights journey. A Google Civil Rights map includes links to important American newspapers and their coverage of civil rights events and leaders. Be sure to sign up for your free NewseumED account for complete access to all materials.

tag(s): black history (59), civil rights (117), constitution (78), journalism (46), newspapers (94)

In the Classroom

Use any or all of the units and interactives with any Civil Rights lessons; this site isn't just for Black History Month! Share with journalism students as they explore the role of the press in shaping and telling the story of a nation. Have small groups or pairs of students make a multimedia presentation exploring the First Amendment and the role of the press using a tool such as Ignite, reviewed here. With the web-based Ignite, you can include text, images, and video. The iPad app allows you to add audio, too. To illustrate different press coverage around the nation, have students create maps using Animaps, reviewed here; students can add text, images, and location stops!
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'Watergate' Video Lesson - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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This NewseumED video lesson explores the role of the press in the 1970's Watergate scandal. Activities include watching a video and completing a comprehension worksheet. In addition...more
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This NewseumED video lesson explores the role of the press in the 1970's Watergate scandal. Activities include watching a video and completing a comprehension worksheet. In addition to the 30-minute lesson, several ideas for extension activities are included. To find related activities on Newseum, scroll to the bottom of the page for additional ideas. Sign up for NewseumED (FREE) to access all materials.

tag(s): 1970s (12), journalism (46), presidents (126)

In the Classroom

Include this site with any lessons on the power of the press, the 70's, or presidents. This site is perfect for a flipped classroom activity, have students view the video and complete the worksheet questions at home before going in-depth with the material at school. Have students create a timeline of events related to Watergate (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles, reviewed here. Allow students to be journalists and create their own newspaper using a site such as Zinepal, reviewed here. Click "Start with a blank e-Book."
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'The Press and the Civil Rights Movement' Video Lesson - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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'The Press and the Civil Rights Movement' video portrays the importance to democracy of having a free press. Using original clips from different television news shows, newspapers, and...more
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'The Press and the Civil Rights Movement' video portrays the importance to democracy of having a free press. Using original clips from different television news shows, newspapers, and photographs (all primary sources) of the 1950s and 1960s the video delves into the idea that the civil rights movement may not have gotten very far without a free press. Find a step by step lesson plan including before and after viewing discussion questions, a viewing guide with short answer questions, and a handout with the names of the major figures in the video and what they had to do with the civil rights movement. View the video before showing to students to deem whether the strong language, gestures, and violence may be inappropriate for your class.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (78), freedom of speech (10), martin luther king (37)

In the Classroom

Using the Activity lesson plan/viewing guide, have the before viewing discussion with your class. Consider giving all students a chance to voice their opinions (even the shyest and quiet ones) by using a backchannel tool like 81 Dash, reviewed here. Then, show the video to the whole class, or "flip" the class and have them watch it at home. Either way, the viewing guide questions could be inserted into the video using a tool such as playposit (formerly known as eduCanon), reviewed here. After the video, use the discussion questions and 81 Dash again. Next, have students (or small groups) choose one of the extension activities to complete and share with classmates.

The reviewers at TeachersFirst have some suggestions for tools to use for those final projects: For items 1-4 make a chart using a tool such as Creately, reviewed here, or Draw.io, reviewed here. For managing a project like item 5 use Google Keep, reviewed here, Workflowy, reviewed here, or Todoist, reviewed here. For items 6 & 7, biography type projects, use Fakebook, reviewed here, and for item 8, make a collage, use Fotojet, reviewed here.
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Civil Rights Timeline - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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This interactive timeline from NewseumED uses primary source news articles and photographs, with explanations, about the events covering American's civil rights from the ratification...more
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This interactive timeline from NewseumED uses primary source news articles and photographs, with explanations, about the events covering American's civil rights from the ratification of the Bill of Rights in 1791 through Alexander vs. Holmes in 1969. Use the slider at the top to see all of the articles. Of course there are the usual articles about the assassinations of President Kennedy, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, the March on Washington, The Formation of the Black Panther Party, and Letter from Birmingham Jail, 1963. However, there are many other interesting articles that are pertinent to today's news, too many to list here. Some of these are: Poor People's Campaign 1968, Riots Spur National Study 1967, Orangeburg Massacre 1968, Watts Riot and the Bloody Sunday March 1965, Freedom Summer Campaign for Voter Registration (and education for black children) 1964, Baptist Church Bombing 1963, and The Children's Crusade 1963. To access this timeline you must register for a FREE NeweumED account.

tag(s): black history (59), civil rights (117), constitution (78), martin luther king (37)

In the Classroom

Civil Rights is about more than a movement that took place forty plus years ago. Americans have fought for their civil rights going back to the late 1700s. We are still fighting for them today. Review the timeline with a projector and the whole class. Then suggest to students that some of the articles have parallel situations going on today. Have them choose an article and research the situation from back in the 1960s and then compare it to a similar situation that is ongoing in the 21st century. Challenge students to present their findings to classmates by creating a simple infographic using Easel.ly, reviewed here, or an online poster creator using Checkthis, reviewed here.

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Freedom in the Balance - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Freedom in the Balance is a free resource from NewseumED that uses real-life scenarios and historical and contemporary case studies to examine individual rights vs. national security....more
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Freedom in the Balance is a free resource from NewseumED that uses real-life scenarios and historical and contemporary case studies to examine individual rights vs. national security. Click on More Details and use the drop-down menu for Explore the Questions. That is where you will find the essential questions, and the What Happened Then? and What's Happening Now? case studies. Click the button for the interactive Take Our Quiz to find out where you stand on freedom and whom you would "click with" in history. For the quiz, you will read ten scenarios, based on real-life examples, and select one of four responses about how you feel about the issue presented. Then get your profile results and see how you rank among all quiz takers. There is also an option to explore a case study based on the man who landed a gyrocopter on the Capitol lawn to bring attention to the need for campaign finance reform.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (78), freedom of speech (10)

In the Classroom

Review the First Amendment and the rights it provides to the citizens of the United States. Consider showing '45 Words' Video Lesson, reviewed here, for this. Then have students take the interactive quiz to find out their freedom profile. Pair together or make small groups of students who received different results from taking the quiz. Have the small groups or pairs each take a different essential question and read about the What Happened Then and What's Happening Now? case studies. Have students create a simple infographic using Piktochart, reviewed here, to present what they learned to their classmates. Next, have them analyze the scenarios from the quiz and the possible responses to see which responses issued their profile/results. Ask students to apply the knowledge gained from this investigation to create a scenario and responses for the Explore the Case Study about the man who landed a gyrocopter on the Capitol lawn to bring attention to the need for campaign finance reform.
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'45 Words' Video Lesson - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Brought to you by NewseumED, this video is a perfect fit to introduce any unit on the First Amendment and its freedoms. Find a comprehensive lesson plan, watch the video ...more
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Brought to you by NewseumED, this video is a perfect fit to introduce any unit on the First Amendment and its freedoms. Find a comprehensive lesson plan, watch the video through the NewseumEd site, and download documents in either PDF or Word formats. The documents include a list of historical figures and their involvement with the issues from the period, and a viewing guide worksheet for students to fill in. All of the actors' words, in the video, are direct quotations taken from primary sources. Since the video focuses on the origins of the freedom of the press, it would make a fascinating intro to a media literacy unit, too.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (78), media literacy (55), video (252)

In the Classroom

Whether studying the First Amendment or media literacy, upload this video to a tool such as EDPuzzle, reviewed here, to edit the video to show only portions you select, or to pause the video automatically and add questions for students to answer, and/or add your verbal comments. Some of the Discuss questions would be appropriate to insert after viewing parts of the video. Break students into small groups after the video and assign them different Discuss questions for reflection and investigation. Challenge small groups to create a presentation to share what they learned using a tool like Zoho Show (similar to Powerpoint, but easier and free), reviewed here. After watching and discussing the video, extend either a media literacy unit or a civics/government unit. Do this by asking students to view news articles in our present political situation i.e. election time, civil rights discussed, etc.. Then have them compare how the news media during the late 1700s would have handled issues of today, and how politicians of the Federalist party would have reacted to our issues today. Alternatively, have students create a simple infographic comparing the problems in the news of then and now. Use a tool such as Piktochart, reviewed here.
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Believe It or Not? - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and news articles provide by NewseumEd to help young adults understand what media literacy is and to tell the difference between good and bad...more
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and news articles provide by NewseumEd to help young adults understand what media literacy is and to tell the difference between good and bad information. Though the lessons seem to center around a visit to Newseum and their galleries, there is a lot to be learned just by examining and discussing the materials presented here. There are discussion questions, media issues to think about, suggested in-class activities, and worksheets. Find a Unit plan with lessons that are standards aligned and Common Core compatible. The Unit plan and worksheets are available in both PDF and Word document formats.

tag(s): media literacy (55), news (262)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free lessons, discussion questions, sample articles, and worksheets offered for use in your classroom. Divide students into small groups and assign different discussion questions and activities to each group. Challenge the small groups to create a slide presentation using Swipe, reviewed here, demonstrating information learned. With Swipe students can add videos, images and documents making them all interactive.
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You Can't Say That in School?! - NewseumED

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8 to 12
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and court cases provided by NewseumEd to help young adults learn about their five freedoms according to the First Amendment and what limitations...more
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Use the lessons, discussion questions, and court cases provided by NewseumEd to help young adults learn about their five freedoms according to the First Amendment and what limitations there might be. Students should be able to understand how these rights apply to their daily life once you have gone through these materials. Though the lessons seem to center around a visit to Newseum and their galleries, there is a lot to be learned just by examining and discussing the materials presented here. This unit is standards aligned and Common Core compatible. It is comprehensive and includes printable discussion guides, as well as extension activities.

tag(s): civil rights (117), constitution (78), freedom of speech (10)

In the Classroom

Download and carefully read through the Unit - You Can't Say That in School?! Select activities and discussion questions that you think will pique student interest. Take advantage of the suggestions made in the ready-made lesson of the Unit - You Can't Say That in School. Break students into small groups, by interest, to investigate the results of each of the Allowed or Not Allowed questions. Have students present their findings to the class using a simple infographic tool such as Piktochart, reviewed here.
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Civil War - Tale of Two Titans - Norwich University's Master of Arts in Military History Program

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5 to 12
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Discover this interesting infographic comparing two leaders of the Civil War. Learn about Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee with comparisons of both their personal life and careers....more
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Discover this interesting infographic comparing two leaders of the Civil War. Learn about Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee with comparisons of both their personal life and careers. Information also includes famous battles during the Civil War and their careers following the war. Scroll past the infographic to view sources used and additional information.

tag(s): 1800s (45), civil war (146)

In the Classroom

Use the provided embed code to insert the infographic into your class website. Have students use this as a starting point for further research on Civil War leaders. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast information. Have students create Civil War timelines (with music, photos, videos, and more) using Capzles, reviewed here.

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GeoInquiries - ESRI

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4 to 12
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GeoInquiries offers standards-based collections for teaching map-based concepts. Choose from several different content topics such as Earth Science, US History, and more. Locate the...more
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GeoInquiries offers standards-based collections for teaching map-based concepts. Choose from several different content topics such as Earth Science, US History, and more. Locate the complete list of available collections on the left side of the homepage. After choosing a broad topic, select a specific activity, then click to open the PDF for easy access to content. In addition to the GeoInquiries, this site also includes several additional lengthier activities including all necessary teacher and student materials.

tag(s): agriculture (54), american revolution (86), civil war (146), climate change (64), cold war (29), demographics (19), earthquakes (48), landforms (45), maps (286), minerals (17), oceans (146), population (60), rocks (50), volcanoes (61), weather (186), world war 1 (53)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free lessons offered on GeoInquiries for use in your classroom. Divide students into groups to participate in different activities or use as enrichment for gifted students to complete independently. When finished with your inquiries, challenge students to create a presentation using Prezi, reviewed here, demonstrating information learned.
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Global Conflict Tracker - Council on Foreign Relations

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8 to 12
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This interactive provides up-to-date information about global conflicts, and specifically the impact on U.S. interests. Colors display the impact on the U.S. with red being more critical...more
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This interactive provides up-to-date information about global conflicts, and specifically the impact on U.S. interests. Colors display the impact on the U.S. with red being more critical and green as limited. Hover over any highlighted area to learn the area affected. Click to find out more such as the number of people affected, recent developments, and background about the conflict. Use filters to view information by region or different types of conflict.

tag(s): conflict resolution (8), cross cultural understanding (114), cultures (104), journalism (46), maps (286), terrorism (49), terrorist (16)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this interactive for use throughout the year when discussing current events or studying different regions around the world. Share the locations using Google Earth, reviewed here, to get a first-hand look at the geography of the region. This tool is a great find for gifted students. Have them explore different regions of conflict and research the background of events in the area. Challenge students to make a multimedia presentation using information found in their research. Use a tool like Zeetings, reviewed here. Zeetings allows adding polls, videos, embeds, web links, PowerPoint, and PDFs. Have students create & embed a timeline to their presentation using Dipity, reviewed here, to demonstrate important events in the conflicted area. You may wish to share this tool on your website for parents and students to review when planning a trip, or if they have family in an affected area.

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Rock the Vote - Jeff Ayeroff

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8 to 12
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Rock the Vote is a non-profit organization dedicated to getting young people out to vote. Their home page includes information for voters across the country about voter registration,...more
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Rock the Vote is a non-profit organization dedicated to getting young people out to vote. Their home page includes information for voters across the country about voter registration, where to vote, and election information. Other links direct you to contact information for local and national elected officials. Are you registered to vote? It's easy to find out through Rock the Vote, enter your address and date of birth and find out your registration status.

tag(s): elections (77), politics (101)

In the Classroom

Include a link to Rock the Vote on your class web page for eligible students to access voter registration and other information. Include Rock the Vote as part of any election unit. Have students learn about the latest voting news, explore requirements for voter registration, and discover reasons why it is important to be part of the voting process. Have students create an annotated image including text boxes and related links describing the voter registration process for your state using a tool such as ThingLink, reviewed here.

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Data USA - Deloitte, Datawheel, and Cesar Hidalgo

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6 to 12
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Data USA provides a comprehensive and in-depth look at data across the United States using public government data. Search for data using cities, states, or topics such as education...more
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Data USA provides a comprehensive and in-depth look at data across the United States using public government data. Search for data using cities, states, or topics such as education or occupations. When searching for locations, Data USA provides an exhausting overview of demographics, economy, health, and more for the locations. In addition to searching for data, this site also offers many maps demonstrating statistics for population, median age, workforce, and much more. Choose the stories link to read stories written using the data found on the site.

tag(s): cities (25), communities (37), DAT device agnostic tool (191), data (150), demographics (19), population (60), states (163), statistics (122)

In the Classroom

Bookmark Data USA to use as a resource for finding and comparing U.S. statistics. Explore information about your city or state and compare to other locations. Show students a purpose for these facts by assigning different articles from the Stories section. Dig deeper into current events using this site. Explore the demographics and economy of any place in the news to help understand local issues. If your class has a partner class in another part of the country, Data USA is a perfect resource for sharing and comparing community information. Depending on the topic of study, after exploring this site, challenge students to make a multimedia presentation such as a poster using Check This, reviewed here, an infographic with Piktochart, reviewed here, or a slide show using Slidestory, reviewed here.

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How the Electoral College Works - CGP Grey

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5 to 12
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Many students (and adults) don't fully understand the electoral college process; this short video explains the electoral college in easy to understand terms. The moderator delves into...more
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Many students (and adults) don't fully understand the electoral college process; this short video explains the electoral college in easy to understand terms. The moderator delves into some of the complications and misunderstandings involved with the electoral college and discusses how some U.S. citizens don't have electoral college representation. If your district blocks YouTube, the video may not be viewable. You could always view the video at home and bring it to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the video from YouTube.
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tag(s): elections (77), electoral college (15)

In the Classroom

Use the site on an interactive whiteboard to illustrate the impact of Electoral College voting on the election of the US President, both today and in the past. Share this video on an interactive whiteboard or projector during election season or a unit on voting and elections. Alternatively, embed it in your class web page for the duration of your elections unit. Have students create their own "in plain English" video about a topic in government and share them using a tool such as SchoolTube, reviewed here.

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Electing a US President in Plain English - Common Craft

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5 to 12
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Electing a President in Plain English is a video describing, in simple terms, how the US electoral process works during a presidential election. The video focuses on the influence of...more
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Electing a President in Plain English is a video describing, in simple terms, how the US electoral process works during a presidential election. The video focuses on the influence of population on the overall voting process and provides a quick overview of the general vote and the electoral college. If your district blocks YouTube, the video may not be viewable. You could always view the video at home and bring it to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the video from YouTube.

tag(s): elections (77), electoral college (15)

In the Classroom

Share this video on an interactive whiteboard (or projector) as part of any election unit. Have students research the number of electoral votes available in your state. Have students create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Piktochart, reviewed here.

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Saints & Strangers - National Geographic

Grades
8 to 12
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Saints & Strangers is an interactive activity that puts you in the role of the Pilgrims landing in Plymouth in 1620. As you make decisions about how to govern and ...more
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Saints & Strangers is an interactive activity that puts you in the role of the Pilgrims landing in Plymouth in 1620. As you make decisions about how to govern and live, you also visit your colony to complete quests requiring players to make difficult decisions along the way.

tag(s): explorers (60), game based learning (97), holidays (148), pilgrims (17), thanksgiving (37)

In the Classroom

Engage your students by sailing into 1620 Plymouth. Share the experience using your interactive whiteboard or projector and the Saints & Strangers introductory video. Next, share the Tutorial pointing out the goal in this activity and different aspects such as clicking on key character images to ask their advice when facing a difficult decision. Then allow students to explore on their own. The text portion might be challenging. Pair weaker readers with stronger readers. Have students create an annotated image to discuss one of their choices, including text boxes and related links using a tool such as Thinglink, reviewed here. Create a class wiki with links to other resources on the pilgrims. Not comfortable with wikis? Check out the TeachersFirst Wiki Walk-Through. Be sure to include Saints & Strangers as part of your Thanksgiving lesson plans.

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Smithsonian Learning Lab - The Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access

Grades
4 to 12
1 Favorites 1  Comments
   
Discover, create, and share digital resources from the Smithsonian Museum, the National Zoo, and nine major research centers with this visually appealing site. Use the search feature...more
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Discover, create, and share digital resources from the Smithsonian Museum, the National Zoo, and nine major research centers with this visually appealing site. Use the search feature to find digital resources including photos, recordings, videos, and text. Sign up to create your own collections, including those found on the site and your own resources. Add annotations and develop quizzes. Easily share your creations or curated collections using social networking links provided. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable. You could always view them at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid, reviewed here, to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): animals (277), architecture (82), art history (70), aviation (40), black history (59), civil war (146), dinosaurs (57), explorers (60), images (259), inventors and inventions (103), scientists (68)

In the Classroom

The Smithsonian Learning Lab is a must-add to your list of classroom bookmarks! Search for collections and information throughout the year on all topics. Add a link to classroom computers for the entire site or specific collections. Be sure to take advantage of the many features of this site to create customized collections, then have students add additional resources. Have students create quizzes for review of topics. Challenge students to create a simple infographic sharing their findings using Easel.ly, reviewed here.

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Newsela - Students Vote 2016 - Matthew Gross

Grades
4 to 12
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Create informed citizens and voters with Newsela's Student's Vote 2016. At their reading level, students learn about the candidates and vote in the "student primary." Newsela publishes...more
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Create informed citizens and voters with Newsela's Student's Vote 2016. At their reading level, students learn about the candidates and vote in the "student primary." Newsela publishes high-interest news articles, from the best news sources, at five reading levels. See the TeachersFirst review here.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): elections (77), news (262), newspapers (94), reading comprehension (113)

In the Classroom

If you haven't already, sign up for Newsela and create your class. Add students by using a teacher (or parent) provided code rather than an email address. Go to the Election Text Sets and assign reading-level specific articles to individual students, or download printable PDF copies of the article in any of its reading level versions. Be sure to set up a time for your students to vote on election day.

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Channel One News: One Vote - Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Company

Grades
3 to 12
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Channel One News: One Vote is sure to appeal to and educate young readers. They will meet candidates, and learn how the election process works through engaging videos, infographics,...more
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Channel One News: One Vote is sure to appeal to and educate young readers. They will meet candidates, and learn how the election process works through engaging videos, infographics, and interactive pages. Find a delegate tracker and a field guide to the candidates (both interactive), a Presidential Trail Calendar and Results, information about One Vote's mock election, and more. Scrolling towards the bottom of the landing page you will find 60-second wrap-ups for each week, two quizzes about the importance of voting and where you stand, and various articles.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): elections (77), news (262)

In the Classroom

Make sure your students know what the U.S. primaries are about and why voting is so important. Use an interactive whiteboard or projector to introduce One Vote to students. Set up a link on class computers, or at a learning center for students to take the two quizzes. They can learn about why each ballot counts and find a match to the candidate they lean towards. This will help them see where they stand on issues like taxes, immigration, and climate change. Each week show the 60-second wrap up and hold a discussion. Consider using a tool like TodaysMeet, reviewed here, so the quiet and shy students have a chance to participate in the discussion, too. View the information about mock elections to see if you would like to set one up for your class or school. Put a link to this site on your class webpage for students to use at home.
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