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The Naked Scientists - University of Cambridge

Grades
5 to 12
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Love science? Find ideas, extraordinary information, and experiments on this entertaining site. Listen to the weekly science podcasts and archives that cover a vast array of topics...more
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Love science? Find ideas, extraordinary information, and experiments on this entertaining site. Listen to the weekly science podcasts and archives that cover a vast array of topics including those that may seem unbelievable. This realistic and scientific site looks at topics like aliens and telepathy as well as ballistics and volcanoes. Find in-depth information explained with scientific clarity, even complex topics, explained in terms that everyone can understand and from multiple perspectives.

tag(s): experiments (71), genetics (90), oceans (148), podcasts (52), volcanoes (61)

In the Classroom

Use Naked Science to explore topics as an introduction in class. Or use these articles to hook students during a start-of-school "what is science" unit. Use the site to find answers to many of the tough questions that students can pose during classroom instruction. Provide time for students to research the facets of a topic as a group for lively group or class discussions. Discuss the set up of the problems, description of the theories, or how to separate fact from opinion. Research the backgrounds of the experts on this site. Teachers of gifted students and regular classroom teachers seeking ways to adapt for gifted students will find this site well-suited to the eclectic interests and angles of out-of-the-box thinkers. Be sure to share the link on your class web page.
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Laboratory - Planet SEED - Schlumberger Excellence in Educational Development, Inc.

Grades
6 to 10
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PlanetSEED offers a number of high quality interactive science activities. Increase your understanding of seemingly complex physical science concepts using the interactives and laboratory...more
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PlanetSEED offers a number of high quality interactive science activities. Increase your understanding of seemingly complex physical science concepts using the interactives and laboratory activity resources found here. Activities require minimal to no equipment and are thought provoking. Making this site even more advantageous are its links to further information that is age appropriate and highly understandable for curious minds. Topics include physical science concepts such as density, buoyancy, magnetism, the carbon cycle, gases, and more.

tag(s): carbon (21), carbon dioxide (17), density (21), electricity (89), magnetism (36), matter (58)

In the Classroom

Employ individual activities from PlanetSEED's Laboratory page in classroom activities to reinforce physical science concepts such as density, buoyancy, magnetism, the carbon cycle, gases, and more! Have students use the buoyancy interactive as an alternative to a lab in class to save time and money. Ask students to figure out which material would make the amusement park floating ride, both the solution media and the floating object. Challenge them to think beyond what they have already experienced in everyday life. Have them create a chart of solutions and solids in their notebook or even in a spreadsheet. Once they have experimented with the interactive, have them measure the actual density of fluids and solids in real life or research densities on the Internet for actual values. Extend the activity into a cost/benefit analysis of building and operating a ride out of the materials chosen.
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Center for PRobing the NanoScale - Nano Activities - Stanford University

Grades
2 to 12
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Nano has become a buzz word in our language, but what does it really mean? Find out by looking at this site from Stanford University. Do you have billions of ...more
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Nano has become a buzz word in our language, but what does it really mean? Find out by looking at this site from Stanford University. Do you have billions of things to do, and no time for things that are as small as a billionth of a meter? You need to make time to learn about this tiny scale that packs a mighty little punch today in science, technology, and even in our global economy. Make some time for this teeny tiny stuff because it's big, very big! This website provides a set of thorough, hands-on lesson plans that are excellent for magnifying this microscopic concept.

tag(s): inventors and inventions (101), measurement (159), microscopes (13)

In the Classroom

Are you struggling to wrap young minds around the tiny world of nanoscale? Lessons are appropriate for grades two to twelve, but could be adapted if you are teaching middle level students who have never been introduced to the world of nanotechnology. As an introduction for students who have never thought about nano, talk about how the use of this technology created better underwear that help prevent odor and decrease sweating. This is sure to start an interesting conversation. Just make sure that you set boundaries before you begin the discussion. See what other lines of clothing students could "create" with nanotechnology. Have them share their "inventions" on a class wiki or in a multimedia presentation using one of the many TeachersFirst Edge tools reviewed here.

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Science Video Animation - Russell Kightley media

Grades
6 to 12
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Explore an impressive set of science and engineering animations to help explain difficult concepts. View animations and posters. Understand what the visual is about by reading the background...more
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Explore an impressive set of science and engineering animations to help explain difficult concepts. View animations and posters. Understand what the visual is about by reading the background information. Animations and posters cannot be used off the site without purchasing, but this is an excellent resource for viewing and sharing in its online version. Topics include different types of engines, how an eye works and vision problems, convection, waves, and more. There are also several animations about geometric solids.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): atoms (56), cells (102), colors (79), diseases (66), dna (69), earth (228), electricity (89), energy (198), engineering (125), geometric shapes (163), light (46), machines (30), molecules (43), solar system (119), sun (71), vision (87), waves (21)

In the Classroom

Use the simulations to help explain topics and concepts in class. Language arts teachers can use this site as a source for nonfiction reading comprehension. Science and language arts teachers can use the site as a learning center for students who need enrichment. Find great animations to help visualize various topics from different viruses to diesel engines, the Doppler Effect, to the garden sundial, and the vertical sundial to name just a few. Check the readability of the animations you want students to use on their own by using the The Readability Test Tool reviewed here.

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Tesla - Master of Lightning - PBS

Grades
4 to 12
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Flash to PBS to get a bolt of learning about Nikola Tesla. Discover a compressive view of Tesla from his early years and his coming to America. Follow his ...more
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Flash to PBS to get a bolt of learning about Nikola Tesla. Discover a compressive view of Tesla from his early years and his coming to America. Follow his accomplishments while harnessing the Niagara. Discover the true mystery about who invented the radio. Trace his inventions and accomplishments. Inside the lab, discover the AC motor, the Tesla coil, radio, remote controls, and improved lightning. Resources include a timeline of electricity and radio, Tesla's patents, and articles about Tesla. Explore discussions from experts about Tesla's life and accomplishments. There are lesson plans for teachers. Some materials are for sale.

tag(s): electricity (89), energy (198), industrial revolution (25), inventors and inventions (101), motion (59), radio (27)

In the Classroom

Add intrigue and mystery, to your science unit on electricity, motion, or inventors as you study the life and accomplishments of Nikola Tesla. Excellent lesson plans include a concrete understanding of potential energy, mechanical energy to electrical energy. Use on an interactive white board to begin your unit or create a "Who Dunnit" with electricity or radio. Follow the structure of ideas presented to create an online "famous scientist" wiki, blog or PowerPoint to add to your class website. Use a Socratic seminar to debate which scientist should get credit for the induction motor, radio, and even the Industrial Revolution. Use the readings for older students, advanced readers, or gifted students, as they are far above the reading level of elementary and early middle school students. In language arts, writing topics could include "What a shock electricity is in my life" and "Will the true inventor of electricity please stand up?" The ideas and resources are electrifying!
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Exploriments - IL&FS Education & Technology Services Ltd

Grades
9 to 12
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Exploriments has an amazing set of interactive activities, animations, and virtual experiments in mathematics, chemistry, and physics. Don't be a passive learner! Be proactive about...more
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Exploriments has an amazing set of interactive activities, animations, and virtual experiments in mathematics, chemistry, and physics. Don't be a passive learner! Be proactive about learning math and science through the use of these activities. Use the Exploriments directory to find interactives in many content areas, and use the YouTube tab to find videos to explain phenomena based upon the Exploriments interactives. Related iPad apps are not free.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): charts and graphs (195), electricity (89), equations (155), forces (45), mass (23), motion (59), statistics (122), variables (22)

In the Classroom

Put your students into the driver's seat of learning with the interactives found on this site. Place the link to the Exploriments site on a classroom computer, or a blog, wiki, or other site for easy access. Use an Exploriment to introduce a concept. After using the interactive, generate a list of what students have learned even before the concept is studied in class. Use as a learning station in the classroom along with other learning experiences to explain a concept. Note: Register and sign in to be able to view and use the interactives. Download SMART notebook lessons for use in the classroom.
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Art of Science - Jonathan Harris and Grady Klein, Princeton University

Grades
5 to 12
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This site offers a highly visual way to draw people of any age into science and a fascination with materials, living things, and forces that make up our world. The ...more
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This site offers a highly visual way to draw people of any age into science and a fascination with materials, living things, and forces that make up our world. The collections are the result of an annual competition at Princeton University and were produced as a result of actual scientific research. Click on each image to view a description of the background of the image. Click on other years at the bottom of the screen. These images are simply stunning!

tag(s): images (266), photography (160)

In the Classroom

Share these images as inspiration to begin a related curriculum unit or to draw students into the powerful world of scientific discovery. Explore and discuss "What is science?" by viewing these images. Consider taking up close pictures of what your students see when they are looking at their labs in your science class. Include the arts in your science class by asking your arts-oriented students to talk about why the images are artistically appealing as an avenue into the world of science. Challenge students to watch for similar art/science photos-- or perhaps take their own -- and add them to a class art or science wiki page. Invite your art teacher (if you have one) to share these photos in art class, as well.

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Discover Design: A Student Design Experience - Chicago Architecture Foundation

Grades
8 to 12
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Learn about architectural design and construction of buildings and more and about design in general. This site also gives teens a forum to post design ideas and receive feedback from...more
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Learn about architectural design and construction of buildings and more and about design in general. This site also gives teens a forum to post design ideas and receive feedback from others their age as well as teachers and design professionals. Discover Design also promotes a challenge every year for student teams to create an innovative remake of something (lunchroom, food stand, locker, etc.) at their school. The registration deadline is in the first week in April with final project due the second to last week in May. Judging begins the last week of May and ends the second week of June. View the contest requirements and rules in great detail with forms on the site. Use this site for lessons and information without an account, but to use the forum tool you need to create a user account.

tag(s): architecture (84), engineering (125), measurement (159), modeling (9)

In the Classroom

Teach students about applied science and math through the use of design. Students will see real life applications, get energized about a possible career, and go beyond repetitious facts or abstract theories. Use this site to spark ideas for your students. Use one of the smaller past challenges for your class. Have students compete to create a new student locker or lunch tray. Have them do research and design prototypes. Have students display their work locally for the school and community. Judge work by the public or by classmates on a rubric. Even if you are not part of the larger Maker's Faire movement, your students can be involved in hands-on design and innovation.

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Scale of the Universe 2 - Cary and Michael Huang

Grades
6 to 12
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Scale of the Universe 2 zooms into the smallest parts of atoms and out to the largest items in the solar system. Use your mouse or click to view objects ...more
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Scale of the Universe 2 zooms into the smallest parts of atoms and out to the largest items in the solar system. Use your mouse or click to view objects that vary incredibly in size. Use this tool to get a sense of the size of the universe through the relationship between familiar and unfamiliar objects. Click on the object, and an information box pops up. Click on the musical note in the upper right corner to silence the music. Spend many hours perusing the variety of information on this site.

tag(s): atoms (56), measurement (159), planets (123), space (205)

In the Classroom

Use your projector or interactive whiteboard and spend time moving through the objects and looking at the relationships between the sizes. Be sure to instruct students on how to read powers of 10 for understanding of the sizes. This would also be a way to help students visualize the concept of scientific notation! Use the items as part of a "size scavenger hunt." Consider creating visual displays of information similar to this to show relationships between objects. Use a zooming tool such as Prezi or any other multimedia tool.
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Spongelab - Andrea Bielecki, Reg Bronskill and Jeremy Friedberg

Grades
8 to 12
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This tool is an amazing, free, online community focused on science with a large number of magnificent animations, case studies, lesson plans, graphics, and multimedia to help explain...more
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This tool is an amazing, free, online community focused on science with a large number of magnificent animations, case studies, lesson plans, graphics, and multimedia to help explain science principles. Use this place to meet others interested in science. Build a profile and add science content from the site. Teachers can transform these pieces to develop lessons and assign to classes. Content is aligned with science texts and other learning materials. Use the community area to find Spongelab related content posted on Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus without leaving the site. Be sure to check out under the What's New, Explore, and Featured Content tabs. Play with the online teaching system to cluster free content together into open and shareable online presentations with notes. The system includes a detailed analytics system to track student experience with the content. One notewothy feature is that images available on the site include licensing information in the caption, so you can easily learn which images are in the public domain or Creative Commons licensed for use in your own multimedia projects! Open them, save them. and cite them to create in any multimedia tool.

tag(s): animation (63), images (266), social networking (112), video (253)

In the Classroom

The power of this site is the ability to organize and share whatever your students need to help them learn. Create lessons using ready-made content found on this site, and keep it all together in one place. This is especially helpful if you teach more than one type of science class. Use the unique science games and content for learning topics in your class. If you teach many student ability levels, you can tailor collections to meet those needs. You can also create collections of Creative Commons or public domain images that students can use to make their own science projects using multimedia tools reviewed at the TeachersFirst Edge (with citations based on the image caption info, of course). Have a student demonstrate how to do this on a projector or interactive whiteboard.

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Numbersleuth: Magnifying the Universe - Science is Beautiful

Grades
K to 12
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This site shows the scale of items from the atom to the universe by using an interactive Infographic. Choose from nine items to begin comparison. Use the blue dot to ...more
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This site shows the scale of items from the atom to the universe by using an interactive Infographic. Choose from nine items to begin comparison. Use the blue dot to zoom in and out by sliding it up and down. The dial gives the difference in size. Be sure to view the Infographic full screen.

tag(s): animals (276), atoms (56), earth (228), measurement (159), planets (123), space (205)

In the Classroom

Provide time for student groups to explore this tool, record observations, discuss information they know, and generate questions. Research information to answer questions. Use this site before discussing the metric system or conversions between various units. It can be used to discuss the use of significant figures and errors in measurements and numbers. Use it as a springboard to measuring and comparing various items that students are familiar with. Embed this on to your class site for easy access by students.
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Ottobib - Jonathan Otto

Grades
3 to 12
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Make a free, easy, "ottomatic" bibliography with Ottobib.com. Type in the ISBN number of any book (without the dashes), choose the style, MLA, APA, Chicago, or Bibtex, and create your...more
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Make a free, easy, "ottomatic" bibliography with Ottobib.com. Type in the ISBN number of any book (without the dashes), choose the style, MLA, APA, Chicago, or Bibtex, and create your perfect book citation. You can also enter multiple books by inserting a comma between the ISBN numbers. Select from linking to the bibliography, having a printed page, or finding at your library through a link to Worldcat, an online library catalog.

tag(s): book reports (36), citations (34)

In the Classroom

Use Ottobib.com as a lesson on citing sources and bibliography on your interactive whiteboard. Include Ottobib.com as a saved favorite on all student computers as well as a link on your webpage. Use as a springboard to discuss styles of documentation including MLA, APA, Chicago, and Bibtex. Be sure to use in writing your own professional articles, books, or classes, as well as a reference for your students.

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Now I See! Infographics as content scaffold and creative, formative assessment - TeachersFirst: Candace Hackett Shively and Louise Maine

Grades
6 to 12
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Discover how to use student-created infographics as scaffold or assessment for learning in any middle or high school subject. Many teachers are not "visual" people and struggle to implement...more
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Discover how to use student-created infographics as scaffold or assessment for learning in any middle or high school subject. Many teachers are not "visual" people and struggle to implement infographics because they do not know how to help students. Whether you are a visual person or a "data" person, these pages will help your class get started. See the story of one teacher's journey into using infographics and learn from her experience. Find downloadable files to help: a PowerPoint you can use with students, and a customizable rubric. Don't miss the extensive Resources and Tools page for examples, background articles, and more. These pages grew out of a presentation at ISTE 2012.

tag(s): infographics (42)

In the Classroom

Read through this professional tutorial if you have even considered trying infographics with your students. You will find just the encouragement you need. Mark this one in your Favorites and share the many examples with your students, including student-created examples from a ninth grade class, as you launch your own infographics projects. Let your students "show what they know" in a new way.

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Makerspace - MAKE

Grades
10 to 12
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Join the movement of educators and students who are focusing on making instead of consuming. Students identify an interest and work on a project of their creation to present at ...more
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Join the movement of educators and students who are focusing on making instead of consuming. Students identify an interest and work on a project of their creation to present at a Maker Faire. Unlike Science Fairs which focus mostly on competition, Maker Faires showcase student work and innovation. With focus now on STEM and doing science, Maker Faires are a great way to increase excitement in the STEM areas and careers. The Maker Playbook is an easy way to become familiar with the movement.

tag(s): inquiry (37), science fairs (25), STEM (134)

In the Classroom

Increase the amount of DIY learning in your classroom by joining the Maker Faire movement. Not close to an actual Maker Faire? Implement ideas in the playbook to increase the amount of STEM in your class and a new way to learn to engage your students and create excitement in careers they have not thought about. Consider holding an in-school Maker Faire of your own with parent help.
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Minute physics - Minutephysics

Grades
7 to 12
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View this superb YouTube channel that explains physics ideas in simple terms along with animations. Minute Physics includes many wonderful questions to interest students. Annoying ads...more
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View this superb YouTube channel that explains physics ideas in simple terms along with animations. Minute Physics includes many wonderful questions to interest students. Annoying ads come up first, so preload and pause before sharing with a group.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): matter (58)

In the Classroom

Use this site as an introduction to a physics lesson or new topic. Consider encouraging students to create their own video explanations of concepts in Physics to teach others what they have learned. Share them using a tool such as SchoolTube reviewed here. Gifted students will love these videos. Share this link on your class web page and have students choose a favorite video to explain in detail to the class as a "student teacher." If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.
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Cut The Rope - ZeptoLab

Grades
3 to 12
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Cut the Rope is an action puzzle physics game. The goal in each level is to drop a piece of candy--suspended by a series of ropes--into the mouth of a ...more
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Cut the Rope is an action puzzle physics game. The goal in each level is to drop a piece of candy--suspended by a series of ropes--into the mouth of a cuddly little monster named Om Nom that is located somewhere on the screen. To do that, you have to cut the ropes in a way that makes the candy swing, jump, or fall into the little guy's mouth. Along the way, you also have to try to pick up all the star items in each level. But this is a puzzle game, so you have to put on your thinking cap to figure out which ropes to cut and in what order. To make things more complicated, you also encounter movable pegs; spikes; electricity; bubbles that make the candy float; and whoopee cushions, which send puffs of air that can blow the candy in different direction

tag(s): inquiry (37), logic (235), problem solving (272)

In the Classroom

Use this game on classroom computers for a logic or problem solving center. Encourage students to share strategies that worked and didn't work and to consider the causes of each. Have them chart the various strategies they test and the results. If individual computeres aren't available, share this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Share a link to the site on your classroom website or newsletter for students to try at home.

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STEM Curriculum - Dayton Regional - Dayton Regional STEM Center

Grades
K to 12
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The Dayton Regional STEM Center offers lessons, units, and curriculum materials in STEM subjects for grades K-12. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math resources are abundant at...more
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The Dayton Regional STEM Center offers lessons, units, and curriculum materials in STEM subjects for grades K-12. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math resources are abundant at this center for hands-on STEM! Primarily it is a curriculum resource for teaching. Search by grade level, subject, or industry. There are captivating hook videos about power and propulsion, sensors, manufacturing, humans and medicine, and air vehicles. Lesson ideas are complete and well thought out. Some have downloadable activities, some are video clips, some are tangible hands on activities, but all are thought provoking. If your district blocks YouTube, then the video clips may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): aircraft (24), atmosphere (26), aviation (39), data (148), energy (198), engineering (125), equations (155), functions (70), geometric shapes (163), magnetism (36), measurement (159), number sense (97), oil (45), operations (126), ratios (53), robotics (25), scientific method (64), solar energy (38), space (205), statistics (122), STEM (134), teaching strategies (24), water (130)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this site as a resource for STEM lessons in your classroom. Use this site as a starting point for individual or group projects or differentiating lessons in your classroom. Search this site for some new ideas to implement in your classroom. Share the Student tab on your class website for students to explore several "kid friendly" topic such as Fish-y Gardening, Pirate Race, Slime Time, Engineer Girl, Build a Bot, and more. Students who complete one of the "kid friendly" projects at home could develop a presentation using a tool like Zoho Show (similar to PowerPoint, but easier and free) - reviewed here), or a multimedia presentation to share with the class. For tools and ideas about creating multimedia presentations see one of many TeachersFirst Edge tools reviewed here.
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Physics Games - PhysicsGames.net

Grades
3 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Play physics inspired games from this website or embed them on your own. These activities are great for any age. Younger students will learn through exploration, trial, and error while...more
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Play physics inspired games from this website or embed them on your own. These activities are great for any age. Younger students will learn through exploration, trial, and error while older students will be able to understand the physics concepts behind the games. They encourage students to start exploring concepts such as energy, force, velocity, gravity, etc. There is a lot of advertising, but at least the sound can be turned off if it bothers you.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): energy (198), forces (45), gravity (46), motion (59)

In the Classroom

Advertising is quite pervasive on the site. You may want to introduce the site on your interactive whiteboard and discuss how to avoid the advertisements before allowing students to explore on their own. This is a great tool to use in the science classroom. Younger students can interact with the games successfully even without much background knowledge. Each of the activities encourages trial and error learning. Ask students to explain to a peer how it works, and they will discover the principles. Older students can try these interactives and write about the physics concepts introduced and explored. If you have a class website, blog, or wiki, embed in your site for easy access.
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Nova Science Now Education - WGBH Educational Foundation

Grades
3 to 12
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Discover a reorganized, teacher-packaged collection of Nova resources for bringing science, technology, and engineering to the classroom. Find standards based, classroom resources based...more
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Discover a reorganized, teacher-packaged collection of Nova resources for bringing science, technology, and engineering to the classroom. Find standards based, classroom resources based on programs from Nova and other PBS programs. There are teacher guides, teacher interactives, and teacher videos. Topics include anthropology, archaeology, earth science, engineering, environmental science, forensic science, geography, health science, history, life science, math, paleontology, physical science, science and society, space science, and technology. At the time of this review, the website is still in BETA version and is not all inclusive in each subject. Find a TV programming schedule to help planning and resource gathering.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): archeology (32), engineering (125), environment (317), forensics (27), paleontology (41), space (205)

In the Classroom

Enjoy the interactives, videos, and text together on an interactive whiteboard or projector. Use selected activities as a center (station). Include as resources for your curriculum. Use as a model to make a wiki for your current topic of study for a group project or classroom project. Not familiar with wikis? Check out the TeachersFirst Wiki Walk-Through. Use this format to spice up your classroom blog.
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Steve Spangler Science Videos - Steve Spangler

Grades
K to 12
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Steve Spangler has brought his fun and educational science experiments to his YouTube page. At the time of this review, the channel had over 400 science experiments in short (approx....more
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Steve Spangler has brought his fun and educational science experiments to his YouTube page. At the time of this review, the channel had over 400 science experiments in short (approx. one minute) videos. Each video demonstrates step by step how to conduct the experiment but leaves it up to the you to decide the science involved. Choose from the featured playlist, browse through uploaded videos, view by fan favorites, or search the channel using a keyword or term to find experiments. Videos can also be sorted by newest or oldest additions. Subscribe to the channel (using your YouTube login) to receive updates when new videos are added. Many include links to further detail and experiment how-tos on Steve's regular web site.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): experiments (71), optical illusions (11), solar energy (38), water (130)

In the Classroom

Show a video on your interactive whiteboard (or projector) as an introduction before conducting an experiment in class. Stop the video before the ending and have students predict what will happen. Have students journal their thoughts to the science at work in the video. Have students create their own comics to explain a topic using comic-creation tools from this collection. Share this site as a resource for science fair projects or for a school science night. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.
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