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Checkology - The News Literacy Project

Grades
5 to 12
2 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Checkology offers interactive lessons to teach students how to evaluate and judge news and news sources. Lessons include real-world examples; many feature journalism experts as the...more
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Checkology offers interactive lessons to teach students how to evaluate and judge news and news sources. Lessons include real-world examples; many feature journalism experts as the digital guide. Participants view videos, take polls, and respond to quizzes within the lessons. The free account includes access to four news literacy lessons along with access to a limited amount of teacher resources.

tag(s): journalism (67), news (230), newspapers (90), social media (44)

In the Classroom

Integrate these free lessons with your other activities when teaching students how to evaluate and judge online information and other news sources. Consider assigning lessons for students to complete on their own, then come together as a class to discuss the content. Add a link to a lesson on a Padlet, reviewed here, and share with students. Ask them to add comments onto the Padlet including links to additional examples of the featured topic. Ask students to compare and contrast information from two sources using a Venn Diagram. Create a Venn Diagram using resources found at Class Tools, reviewed here. Challenge students to become the reporter and enhance their learning by writing their own news article to post as a blog at Edublog, reviewed here. Ask them to include some misinformation within their blog, and then have other class members find and respond to the shared content. Extend learning by having students become the teacher and share their tips and tricks for evaluating news and creating a digital book for other students using Book Creator, reviewed here. Ask them to include videos sharing their tips, written examples of misinformation, and add their Venn diagram to demonstrate different ways facts are used in articles to mislead readers.

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