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ProConIt - ProConIt

Grades
4 to 12
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Create a debate or ask specific questions of a group or the entire web using ProConit as a social evaluation tool. Questions can be pro/con, either-or choices, or open-ended evaluations...more
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Create a debate or ask specific questions of a group or the entire web using ProConit as a social evaluation tool. Questions can be pro/con, either-or choices, or open-ended evaluations of a specific topic. Get creative and write your questions to make them even more engaging. You can embed the ProConit topic in multiple web locations, such as websites or blogs, using ProConit's free widget. Get started simply by registering with your email or other social network log-in. The pubic can vote and add their own comments to the ProConits left open to the public. You can also make them private.
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tag(s): critical thinking (66), debate (34), persuasive writing (42), polls and surveys (39)

In the Classroom

Create a class account that you can control if using this tool with students under 13 or if school policies prohibit student accounts. Use ProConIt on your webpage, wiki, Edmodo group reviewed here, or blog and display it in-class on your interactive whiteboard to develop critical thinking skills and evidence to support an argument (a la Common Core). Challenge students to research the topic so they can provide evidence for their stance when writing about their opinion or while refuting another's. Help students develop flexibility in their thinking by having them argue a side they do NOT agree with. Create a class account with a generic password, and have students put initials as an identifier with their opinion.

Is there anything questionable or controversial about what your students are studying in science? Studying cells? Try a debate about stem cell production. Studying astronomy? Why not have a debate about UFO's, extraterrestrial beings, the creation of the universe? Why not create a debate about whether math is a feature of the universe or a feature of human creation? For language arts and social science teachers this site is a gold mine! Create debates about politics, famous people in history, famous events in history (like what if's), current events, or social issues your students are interested in. Why not create a debate about whether students think being kind to a bully will make the bully stop bullying?

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Creating Community and Getting Inspired with Blog Hops and Events - Krista Stevens/WordPress

Grades
4 to 12
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Discover blog ideas galore from the "friendly writers" at Wordpress, especially these ideas for connecting your blog with other bloggers via special events, such as "blog hops." A blog...more
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Discover blog ideas galore from the "friendly writers" at Wordpress, especially these ideas for connecting your blog with other bloggers via special events, such as "blog hops." A blog hop is simply a response to the same prompt during a fixed time frame, with links to the other bloggers' responses so you can "hop" to read the many takes on the topic from the original post or prompt. Share writing around a common theme, image, quote, or topic by checking out the offerings compiled here. Note that this collection is intended for the general blogging public (not schools), so some topics may not be school-appropriate. On the other hand, making contact with "real world" people blogging about how they write, do photography, stay fit, and more. Click on the link to the updated list of blogging events to find inspiration and connection, sorted by general areas of interest. Don't miss the detailed information about how to Start and/or Participate in a Blog Hop.

tag(s): blogs (80), writing prompts (81)

In the Classroom

In its simplest use, this is a place to find and READ blogs on curriculum-related topics. You can also find questions and prompts for your students to write about offline. Never again will you need to hunt for writing prompts or ways to connect your science or social studies students with the outside world. Of course this is a time to discuss proper netiquette and digital citizenship/safety for interacting with "strangers." If you do not yet have a class or student blogs, you might want to begin with Blog Basics for the Classroom. Be SURE you get parent permission. If your students have blogs, use these ideas as a model for your own weekly or biweekly blog hops on curriculum topics. Since your math students need to write about their problem solving strategies for Common Core, why not make it more fun with a blog hop? Trying to fire up interest in local history? Pose a blog hop prompt asking which local landmark could be replaced with a shopping mall. Looking for students to support arguments with evidence? Spark an environmental question for a blog hop. Browse some of the special topic blog events for discussions related to your current curriculum. For example, connect your plant study unit with gardeners' blogging events. If you teach gifted students, this is the ideal way to connect your students (even reluctant writers) with an outside world that will raise their level of writing and thinking. If you can connect with other teachers who have gifted students, perhaps via the #gtchat Twitter chat, you can set up a regular connection among students in several locations.. in science, social studies, math, or writing classes. Your gifted ones may pull in other blogging classmates, as well!

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Dimensions of Creativity: Sample Project Rubrics - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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Include creativity in project rubrics with the tips and downloadable, editable rubric starters from this page. Make creativity something you can talk about with your students and something...more
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Include creativity in project rubrics with the tips and downloadable, editable rubric starters from this page. Make creativity something you can talk about with your students and something they can actually learn! Promote creativity using terms both teachers and students can understand as part of your rubrics (FFOE): Fluency, Flexibility, Originality, and Elaboration. You no longer have to simply make a category that says "Creativity (5 pts)." These rubric starters give specific ways to assess creativity projects at all levels and can easily be adapted to the projects you do (or want to do) in you classroom. This page is part of a longer article about Dimensions of Creativity.

tag(s): gifted (81), rubrics (25)

In the Classroom

Mark this page in your favorites and refer to it as you develop rubrics for upcoming class or independent projects. Use appropriate options from these samples to customize creativity rubrics for any student who needs a different target. If you teach gifted students, these rubric ideas will help you adapt your existing rubrics to challenge gifted students beyond simply requiring "more of the same." Challenge them to move beyond "excellent" and to know what the expectations are. Consider including them in goal setting as you develop the rubrics together. By including creativity elements in project rubrics you respect student creativity and expect it to grow.

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scistuchat - Adam Taylor

Grades
6 to 12
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This grass roots effort by a Tennessee science teacher spawned a monthly Twitter chat between high school science students in MANY locations and practicing scientists in the "real world."...more
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This grass roots effort by a Tennessee science teacher spawned a monthly Twitter chat between high school science students in MANY locations and practicing scientists in the "real world." The site looks plain vanilla, but the topic is dynamite! Find information, preparation, and topics for upcoming chats, basic information about the chat formats, chat archives, past pre-chat prep resources, and Twitter handles for the scientists and teachers who participate in the chats. Don't forget to follow @2footgiraffe, the instigating teacher, and click through to his blog for some of the back story on how he was able to convince school administration to unblock Twitter (and other tales of tech challenges). The TeachersFirst editors met Mr. Taylor at the ISTE conference and knew this was a resource our users would want to know about.

tag(s): twitter (47)

In the Classroom

Even if you do not choose to join this particular Twitter chat with practitioners in the field, mark this simple site as a professional development resource to learn how to plan and organize successful Twitter chats between your students and the outside world. If you teach another discipline, try searching on Wefollow, reviewed here for people in the field that connect to your curriculum: writers, artists, curators, engineers, and more. Need to learn more about Twitter? Start with help from TeachersFirst's Twitter for Teachers page. Extend the curriculum for your gifted students by having them help organize a chat with professionals and write the questions.

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Scattervox - Scattervox

Grades
4 to 12
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Use Scattervox to conduct a poll visually! For each of the possible items, poll responders click their answer on a graph. The result is an interactive poll that looks like ...more
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Use Scattervox to conduct a poll visually! For each of the possible items, poll responders click their answer on a graph. The result is an interactive poll that looks like an Infographic! To vote: Click on one of the possible items on the right and then click the spot on the graph to correspond to your answer. Once plotted, replace your choices by clicking on the item again and your new answer on the graph. Click "Vote" to record your choices. To "Create Poll": Enter a title, tags, and a description. Label the axes of the graph with two different variables to value the items such as expensive and inexpensive. (There are two different sets of axes to use for rating.) Enter the chart items that will be rated with your set values. Embed your Scattervox or share using email, Facebook, Google Plus, or Twitter. Browse the gallery to get an idea of how the tool works. Membership is required to create a poll, but not to vote.
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tag(s): critical thinking (66), polls and surveys (39)

In the Classroom

This free tool is a great way to identify a value or rating of various items. Use this in science class to poll students on various types of renewable and nonrenewable energies as cheap/expensive and clean/dirty for the environment. Poll students on types of cars, rating the cost and gas mileage. Follow up with research into the various makes and models. Poll about famous presidents and various influences on the economy and society. Compare characters in various novels in measures of motivation and other characteristics. In younger grades, gather data about students favorite animals and why (such as fluffy/ferocious) or favorite colors and mood. Learn more about your students through polling of various social and cultural topics such as fashion, movies, and songs. Use this to identify misconceptions and resistance to various subject areas. Identify foods and feelings for each specific kind of food in Family and Consumer Science or attitudes towards various sports. Conduct specific polls for Introduction to Psychology or Sociology about various topics and reactions to the topics. Use to poll students on project ideas or to determine reactions to current events. Older students may want to include polls on their student blogs or wiki pages to increase involvement or create polls to use at the start of project presentations. Use polls to generate data for math class (graphing), during elections, or for critical thinking activities dealing with the interpretation of statistics. Use "real" data to engage students in issues that matter to them. For Professional development, rate the various types of technology tools for ease of use/difficulty and high/low value for instruction. Place a poll on your teacher web page as a homework inspiration or to increase parent involvement. Gifted students would love this tool to dig deeply into the multiple facets of issues they worry about.

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Michael, NY, Grades: 0 - 12

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Wefollow - Jeff Hodsdon, LLC

Grades
6 to 12
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Use WeFollow to search for Twitter users by interest and sort them by their "Prominence Score," an "objective measure" that WeFollow uses to designate "how established someone is in...more
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Use WeFollow to search for Twitter users by interest and sort them by their "Prominence Score," an "objective measure" that WeFollow uses to designate "how established someone is in the interests they care about." The Prominence score analyzes Twitter patterns to see who "listens" to each person and is useful in finding, following, and learning from prominent people around the world. You can locate experts in any field by entering a search term like "biologist" or "Shakespeare." Find an explanation of this score in the About section. Enter your own expertise information to be part of the ongoing database of Twitter users and their interests! New to Twitter? Learn more at TeachersFirst'sTwitter for Teachers page. Note: As with any tool that involves interaction with the public, searches may bring up unintended results not appropriate for young people. Use this tool under supervision or recommend specific search terms.
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tag(s): social networking (103), twitter (47)

In the Classroom

Increase your learning by finding others to follow -- and learn from their tweets. If using with a class, find those who can help with content students are learning. For example, follow scientists, artists, or writers to enhance your class discussion and learn from others outside the classroom. World language classes may want to follow experts on certain cultures. Earth science classes could follow experts on plate tectonics or volcanoes. Library/Media specialists will want to add this to your reference tools to help teachers or students seeking content experts. Be sure to follow the recommendations in the TeachersFirst review of (Twitter). This is a great tool to help students build a personal learning network in an area of interest, especially for gifted students who may have unusual interests and need the challenge of contact and collaboration with "real world" experts.

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Cosmo Learning - CosmoLearning.com

Grades
6 to 12
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Cosmo Learning aggregates an extensive library of subjects (42 total), courses (thousands to browse), video lectures, documentaries, images, books and other multimedia in dozens of...more
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Cosmo Learning aggregates an extensive library of subjects (42 total), courses (thousands to browse), video lectures, documentaries, images, books and other multimedia in dozens of subjects, all from sources all over the world. Their goal is to be a free online school. Subjects range from Anthropology to Entrepreneurship to Political Studies to Veterinarian Medicine. Find specific content using the search feature. You can also search using links to academic subjects or type of materials such as courses, documentaries, videos, or images. Registration isn't required, but allows you to save and rate features on the site. Be warned: there is a LOT to explore at this site! If your district blocks YouTube, videos may not be viewable. You could always view the videos at home and bring them to class "on a stick" to share. Use a tool such as KeepVid reviewed here to download the videos from YouTube.

tag(s): anthropology (10), archeology (23), architecture (63), business (51), engineering (82), environment (281), geology (70), german (60), marine biology (32), medicine (47), paleontology (38), politics (82), psychology (48), religions (48), sociology (20)

In the Classroom

Use materials from Cosmo Learning as part of any unit or lesson plan. Use materials on the site for flipped lessons or share with gifted learners as an enhancement to current course content. Using the flipped classroom format is helpful if YouTube is blocked at your school. Share lessons on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Teachers of gifted can share this with their students whose interests fall outside typical school curriculum to encourage independent study or projects. Provide the link to this site on your class wiki or website for students (and families) to access anytime.
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Places to Publish for Gifted Young Writers - Carol Fertig

Grades
7 to 12
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This blog post suggests a few places for publishing the writing of your gifted and talented students. Each suggestion offers sites that cater to "real" audiences for young students,...more
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This blog post suggests a few places for publishing the writing of your gifted and talented students. Each suggestion offers sites that cater to "real" audiences for young students, often audiences of their own peers. Explore resources that offer feedback and contests as well as more independent sites that accept submissions from student authors. Although quite short, this post is a great starting point for finding publishing resources for your students.

tag(s): process writing (33)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this article and explore the resources suggested for publishing student work. As you plan for ways to challenge your gifted students, this resource can provide ideas to extend their exposure and collaboration experience with other writers. Of course you will want to have parent permission before allowing interactions from your classroom, but parents of gifted students will probably delight in cooperating and even join in monitoring interactions as needed. Share this resource on your class web page so parents of your talented student-writers can encourage them at home, too.

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10 Myths About Gifted Students and Programs for the Gifted - Carolyn Coil

Grades
K to 12
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Stereotypes and myths abound surrounding the characteristics of gifted students and methods for teaching advanced learners. This short article discusses ten of the most common myths...more
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Stereotypes and myths abound surrounding the characteristics of gifted students and methods for teaching advanced learners. This short article discusses ten of the most common myths related to gifted education. The author discusses reasons why each myth is incorrect in a short, no-nonsense manner. For more information, be sure to check out links provided to resources at the end of the article.

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Read through this article for ideas on appropriate instruction for gifted learners in your classroom. Print and save this article (or bookmark on your computer) to include with your gifted teaching resources. Share this article during professional development sessions in your school and with parents of gifted students.

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OK2Ask'®: Gifted Resources Galore April 2014 - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from April 2014, opens in Adobe Connect. Learn new ways to meet the needs of your gifted students. Participants will...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional development session from April 2014, opens in Adobe Connect. Learn new ways to meet the needs of your gifted students. Participants will view and explore tools that offer enrichment, advancement, differentiation, promote organization and focus, and more. There will be a question/answer period to meet individual challenges. Use exploration time to discover and discuss TeachersFirst resources available to use with gifted students. This fast paced session is appropriate for teachers at all technology comfort levels. As a result of this session and through individual follow-up, teachers will: Gather ideas by exploring 6 -10 specialized resources on TeachersFirst; Explore and practice with selected resources; Investigate and discuss lesson ideas offered in reviews and by other participants; List and discuss other curriculum related projects or activities that could be done using the resources in the teacher's own teaching situation; Have individual questions/concerned addressed by both our experienced Gifted/Talented specialists and other participants; and (Follow-up) Implement one of the provided resources into an upcoming teaching unit or lesson. Applicable ISTE-T standards (2008)*: 1a, b, c; 2a, b, c, d; 3b, c, d; 4c. Please read the full text at ISTE's page

tag(s): gifted (81), organizational skills (91)

In the Classroom

Having a hard time finding materials to enrich and advance your gifted students? Explore (and share) the many resources from this site. Share the organization tips/sites with your students. Share these resources on your class website for both students and parents to access. Take a look at the resource page full of GREAT ideas! Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
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How to Spot a Gifted Student - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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See the most common characteristics of gifted students explained in a format that offers both the positive and possibly negative aspects of typical gifted kids (not that there is such...more
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See the most common characteristics of gifted students explained in a format that offers both the positive and possibly negative aspects of typical gifted kids (not that there is such a thing as "typical"). This pro-con style list can help you sort what appear to be behavior or attitude problems from what may be "side effects" of giftedness. The shift in perspective will help you rethink what may be going on inside the head of a challenging child or student.

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Read and bookmark this list so it stays fresh in your mind, especially as you get to know new students or try not to become frustrated with a particular student in your class. Confer with your colleagues to find out what next steps are possible if you see these characteristics. Talk to your school counselor to find out about possibilities for gifted screening. At the very least, look into past test results, especially those that measure ability, not necessarily achievement. The underachieving gifted student can be particularly hard to figure out! Find strategies for working with the gifted in a regular classroom via the link at the bottom of the page.

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Life Among the Gifted - M J Hayes

Grades
K to 12
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Unravel the mystery of twice exceptional gifted students. Life Among the Gifted offers lists of characteristics of exceptional and twice exceptional children compiled by teachers and...more
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Unravel the mystery of twice exceptional gifted students. Life Among the Gifted offers lists of characteristics of exceptional and twice exceptional children compiled by teachers and parents of gifted students. Browse through two lists beginning with e1 (students identified as exceptional in one area), then moving to e2 (identified as exceptional in 2 or more areas). These lists offer a look into common traits found in gifted student offering insight into why a student may behave "differently" than his peers.

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Share this list with any classroom teachers working with gifted students to help them understand common personality traits of these students. Share with parents of gifted parents to help them understand when their child behaves "differently" than peers. This is a great tool to use to help yourself understand twice exceptional gifted students in your classroom.

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Gifted child, left behind - Amy Crawford

Grades
K to 12
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Are gifted children being left behind? This article takes an in-depth look at gifted education. Explore the reasons why it may not receive priority in our current education system in...more
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Are gifted children being left behind? This article takes an in-depth look at gifted education. Explore the reasons why it may not receive priority in our current education system in all aspects including funding and identification of giftedness. Read through long-term research results and discussions of the No Child Left Behind Act to gain the author's perspective of the challenges we face in meeting the needs of our gifted student population.
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tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Print this article as a resource for discussions when planning gifted programs and curriculum. Share with others in your building and district for use during professional development sessions. Share with parents as a resource for information on gifted education in the United States.

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Cumberland Trace Gifted - DAP Tool - Julia Roberts and Tracy Inman

Grades
K to 12
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The DAP (Developing and Assessing Products) Tool is a set of rubrics developed to assess student products at varying levels of expertise. The intent of the DAP Tool is to ...more
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The DAP (Developing and Assessing Products) Tool is a set of rubrics developed to assess student products at varying levels of expertise. The intent of the DAP Tool is to differentiate while taking the ceiling off higher level and creative thinking skills (perfect for gifted learners). There are four components for all products: content, presentation, creativity, and reflection. The tool offers rubrics at three performance levels. Especially appropriate for removing a "ceiling" for gifted students is the inclusion of an expert or "professional" performance level rating. This rating acknowledges work that one would expect from a professional in the content area. The criteria for each level increase in sophisticated. Level 1 would be for younger students or those with less expertise. Level 3 might be for high school and/or your most gifted students-- at any grade level. There are fourteen different product rubrics and a blank rubric at each level. The blank rubric suggests descriptions for all but the presentation component. Some of the products are PowerPoint, poster, pamphlet, diorama, service learning, monologue, model, and more. Download the rubrics in PDF format.

tag(s): critical thinking (66), differentiation (25), essays (18), interviews (14), posters (24), rubrics (25), service projects (17), speech (87), writing (311)

In the Classroom

Offer individualized rubrics for every project so each student can demonstrate appropriate expertise. These rubrics are perfect to use in the heterogeneous classroom where you might have a mix of ESL/ELL, gifted, and learning support students. Many of these activities are ideal for differentiating for your gifted students and providing challenges more suited to their ability, creativity, and thought process.
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What Is Giftedness? - National Association for Gifted Children

Grades
K to 12
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Find current definitions of giftedness in the U.S. as explained by NAGC. See the variations between legal and clinical/research-based definitions. The brief history of gifted is informative...more
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Find current definitions of giftedness in the U.S. as explained by NAGC. See the variations between legal and clinical/research-based definitions. The brief history of gifted is informative and lends some perspective on where gifted programs began. For more information, explore the many useful links.

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Read and bookmark this in your professional resources as a "must-know." If you have students in your class who may be gifted or parents who ask about whether their child should be identified as gifted, this is a good place to start. Remember, however, that most states have their own legal definitions. For a more practical, observational way of "spotting" gifted students, see How to Spot a Gifted Student.

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The Do's and Don'ts of Instruction: What it Means to Teach Gifted Learners Well - Carol Ann Tomlinson, Ed.D

Grades
K to 12
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This short article offers specific information on general indicators of appropriate and inappropriate instruction for gifted students. Each of the 11 statements offers a general topic...more
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This short article offers specific information on general indicators of appropriate and inappropriate instruction for gifted students. Each of the 11 statements offers a general topic of information. Specific examples are also provided. Sample ideas include addressing good and appropriate curriculum while avoiding putting gifted students in the role as a classroom tutor. As a conclusion, the article reminds us that "What it takes to teach gifted learners well is actually a little common sense."

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Read through this article for ideas on appropriate instruction for gifted learners in your classroom. Print and save this article (or bookmark on your computer) to include with your gifted teaching resources. Share this article during professional development sessions in your school and with parents of gifted students.

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Common Myths in Gifted Education - National Association for Gifted Children

Grades
K to 12
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Take a close look at myths versus truths in Gifted Education at this informative site. Topics range from identification of gifted students through information on accelerated options....more
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Take a close look at myths versus truths in Gifted Education at this informative site. Topics range from identification of gifted students through information on accelerated options. Browse through a series of over 10 myths related to Gifted Education and then view a short discussion of the truth. Each set of truths includes links to further information on the National Association for Gifted Children's website. You will find articles, studies, and webpages related to the specific myth being addressed.

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Share information from this site during professional development sessions in your school as a resource for properly serving your gifted population. Use information from this site when holding parent conferences as a resource for research on gifted education.

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Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted - SENG

Grades
1 to 12
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Change lives and change futures of gifted and talented individuals by gaining a more comprehensive view of being gifted. SENG's mission is to empower families and communities to help...more
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Change lives and change futures of gifted and talented individuals by gaining a more comprehensive view of being gifted. SENG's mission is to empower families and communities to help gifted and talented individuals to reach their goals: intellectually, physically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually. A variety of programs offers education either through home study courses, annual conferences, online parent support groups, or ways to establish a parent support group in your area. Continuing education credits are offered for health care professionals or any interested individual. Find a health care provider in your own area. Free materials further explain medical misdiagnosis for Gifted, Emotional Health, Twice Gifted, ADHD, Roles for Health Care Professionals, and more. An extensive free library of print, audio, and video resources help explain needs of gifted and talented students and how to advocate for them. Find links to other gifted organizations, books, and downloadable informational brochures.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): gifted (81)

In the Classroom

Have questions about a gifted child or a child you suspect to be gifted? Teach a gifted and talented group? Answer many of your own questions and also parent questions with an amazing amount of information available. Sponsor a parent night for Gifted Students and offer and feature many of the resources highlighted. Be sure you have a strong base of your own knowledge of the needs of gifted and talented students. Keep up to date with latest research and information.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Frame Games And Critical Thinking Puzzles by Terry Stickels - Terry Stickels

Grades
2 to 12
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Enjoy the ultimate of word puzzles at Frame Games! Terry Stickels has posted 53 of these, free, for solving. Not sure what a Frame Game is? It is a word ...more
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Enjoy the ultimate of word puzzles at Frame Games! Terry Stickels has posted 53 of these, free, for solving. Not sure what a Frame Game is? It is a word or words in a box (a puzzle of sorts) with funny spelling or shows the word in a special position or presentation. There are many names for this type of puzzle, and you will figure out how they work once you try one. The goal is to guess the meaning (usually a common phrase). Lighten up and have some fun by treating yourself to one of these puzzles when taking a break during the day. Build your mental flexibility. See the correct answers by advancing to the next puzzle.

tag(s): critical thinking (66), flexibility (7), gifted (81), logic (201), puzzles (180)

In the Classroom

Share these puzzles on your projector or interactive whiteboard. Use these puzzles as a morning opener to get students settled and ready for learning. Use as a break when transitioning between activities. ESL/ELL students will benefit by trying to solve these common American English phrases, and learning about them, too! Include these during a study of prepositions and positional words in a speech and language class or during a lesson on idioms in English class. Challenge students to create their own Frame Games of common idioms such as "over a barrel" and share with the class. Have students create posters to share their Frame Games using a tool such as Web Poster Wizard (reviewed here).
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Frontiers for Young Minds - Frontiersin.org

Grades
2 to 10
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This tool is a neuroscience journal that includes articles reviewed by kids! Approved student scientists, ages 8-16, review the articles, and neuroscientists serve as their mentors....more
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This tool is a neuroscience journal that includes articles reviewed by kids! Approved student scientists, ages 8-16, review the articles, and neuroscientists serve as their mentors. The scientific process is followed with young scientists writing their submission specifically for the Frontiers Journal. The article is then peer reviewed. Students and scientists serve as peer reviewers. The process shows how articles are reviewed in major publications and show the scientific process.

tag(s): brain (54), child development (20), human body (87), senses (22)

In the Classroom

Use these articles in Biology or Health class to learn about the brain and factors that affect it. Students will find many articles of interest to them. Articles focus not only on learning, but games, media, emotions, and other activities. Have a bright students looking for a challenge? Encourge him/her to follow the directions to apply as a Young Mind reviewer. Challenge cooperative learning groups to read an article and create an infographic sharing the highlights of what they discovered. Use a tool such as Venngage reviewed here. If you teach gifted science students or would like to offer an advanced option to a gifted student in your regular science class while studying the brain or human body, this journal offers an outstanding opportunity for real world collaboration with scientists and very bright students in other places. Differentiate by going outside school walls! Have your student write an article and/or apply to join the team of young scientists.

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