TeachersFirst's Copyright and Fair Use Resources

Understanding copyright is essential for students living in today’s digital world. Copyright protects original creative works, allowing the creators to control how their material is used and shared. In the classroom, respecting copyright shows students why intellectual property rights and using content ethically matter. By teaching copyright principles, educators prepare students with the necessary knowledge for future courses, careers, and participation in our copyright-respecting world. This collection provided valuable resources for teaching students and staff the basics of copyright. The resources allow for discussions around plagiarism, piracy, and Internet ethics. It includes guidelines on fair use, how to credit sources appropriately, and updated copyright laws and policies.

Explore our entire collection of resources tagged copyright, creative commons, and/or plagiarism.  

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3 Great Lesson Plans on Copyright - Common Sense and Bronwyn H.

Grades
K to 8
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Using the three lessons in this article, help your students learn about and respect the need to understand copyright and fair use. Let's Give Credit for second grade teaches students...more
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Using the three lessons in this article, help your students learn about and respect the need to understand copyright and fair use. Let's Give Credit for second grade teaches students why it is essential to give credit and how to give credit the right way through role-playing activities as detectives. A lesson plan for fourth graders guides students through the rights and responsibilities involved with using images. The Four Factors of Fair Use provides middle school students a framework for understanding fair use, copyright, and domain. Create a free account to access the lessons and materials shared. All lessons correlate with national standards, including ISTE, Common Core ELA, and CASEL.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90), STEM (265)

In the Classroom

Include the shared lessons and activities as part of your digital citizenship curriculum. Use the provided handouts to guide students toward extended learning and discussion of proper digital citizenship practices. For example, second-grade students complete a Digital Citizens Report handout, and as an extension, ask students to create a list of credits for some of their commonly used online sites such as PBS Kids Reading Games, reviewed here or Scratch, reviewed here.
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My Cyberspace Academy Lesson 12: Copyright and Plagiarism - Carnegie Mellon University

Grades
3 to 12
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The PDF lesson plan from Carnegie Mellon University introduces students to copyright issues, defines new terms, emphasizes illegal actions that could occur when using information from...more
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The PDF lesson plan from Carnegie Mellon University introduces students to copyright issues, defines new terms, emphasizes illegal actions that could occur when using information from the Internet, and provides guidance on safe practices for searching and using information online. It includes learning objectives and materials for teachers to use with students.

tag(s): copyright (46), internet safety (113), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

In addition to the existing lesson plan, in small groups, have students use FreeComicMaker.com, reviewed here to create comics featuring heroes who respect copyright laws and villains who disregard them. This project encourages creativity and application of knowledge in a new context extending learning. Then, organize a virtual gallery walk for students to view each group's comics. Utilize a quiz program like Kahoot, reviewed here and use the information from the lesson to create a quiz that focuses on different aspects of copyright. Have students create their own Legal or Illegal trading card utilizing Trading Card Creator, reviewed here.
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Students as Creators: Exploring Copyright - ReadWriteThink and Cassandra Love

Grades
6 to 8
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Students as Creators offers a five-lesson series that provides middle school students with a foundation for the ethical use of copyright materials. This site's information includes...more
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Students as Creators offers a five-lesson series that provides middle school students with a foundation for the ethical use of copyright materials. This site's information includes correlations to state and national standards. The resources and preparation section includes printouts, supplemental websites, and educator preparation suggestions. Visit the Instructional Plan to find all of the lessons and student objectives.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

The lessons are designed to be co-planned and co-taught by a classroom teacher and school media specialist. If this isn't possible in your current situation, consider asking another classroom teacher to collaborate with you on teaching this unit, or break the lessons into smaller pieces and prepare portions of the lesson in your school library as needed. If you cannot teach all of the lessons, review and save the printouts for use by students throughout the year to determine how to address copyright issues with classroom projects. Save copies of the printouts for students to access on your LMS or class website.
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Copyright Education YouTube Playlist - Media Education Lab

Grades
6 to 12
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Media Education Lab offers a twenty-two-video playlist teaching educators and students the purpose of copyright and fair use in digital learning. Most videos are less than fifteen minutes...more
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Media Education Lab offers a twenty-two-video playlist teaching educators and students the purpose of copyright and fair use in digital learning. Most videos are less than fifteen minutes long; however, a couple more extended offerings are approximately twenty minutes long. Topics include plagiarism vs copyright, the future of copyright, and others. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

View the videos shared on this playlist to understand copyright and how to attribute and include copyrighted materials in the classroom appropriately. Use Diffit, reviewed here to extend learning and understanding of the video concepts. Enter the video URL and choose a reading level to automatically create AI-generated resources and student activities, including vocabulary terms, multiple choice questions, and printable activities (look under student activities for items labeled "free this month"). Share videos with parents on your class website to help them understand the importance of properly using copyright and attribution.

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Copyright & Creativity for Ethical Digital Citizens - Copyright & Creativity.org

Grades
K to 12
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Digital Literacy is an important topic to teach to students, and understanding copyright is increasingly essential as all students are now publishers and creators. This site provides...more
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Digital Literacy is an important topic to teach to students, and understanding copyright is increasingly essential as all students are now publishers and creators. This site provides a free curriculum for all grade levels to teach copyright and fair use. Choose from one of the three grade-level bands - elementary, middle school, or high school to access the shared lessons. Each of the grade-level content areas includes lessons, slides, videos, and all materials needed to teach the curriculum fully. In addition to the student lessons, Copyright & Creativity also includes an on-demand teaching unit for professionals that is hosted on Canvas, reviewed here. Videos included with the lessons are hosted on YouTube.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90)

In the Classroom

Utilize the free curriculums offered on this site to teach students (and yourself) about the proper use of copyright. If you are unable to download the videos, this site recommends viewing the videos using View Pure, reviewed here, to remove all of the annoying "extras" included with YouTube videos. As you teach lessons and ask students to brainstorm ideas or compare and contrast information, use a graphic organizer tool such as Popplet, reviewed here, to create and save visual displays of students' ideas that include both text and images. Ask students to include a link to their Popplet organizer on Seesaw, reviewed here, along with original drawings, recordings, or other materials created during your unit. As a final project, extend learning by asking students to create a tutorial about copyright based upon their knowledge. Provide a variety of resources for creating the tutorial as a way to differentiate learning. Examples of some tools to include are Book Creator, reviewed here, or Adobe Creative Cloud Express Video Maker, reviewed here, or create an infographic using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here.
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Quetext Plagiarism Checker - Quetext

Grades
4 to 12
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Check text up to 500 words in length for plagiarism using Quetext. Copy and paste your text to begin the evaluation and receive results within a few minutes. The plagiarism ...more
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Check text up to 500 words in length for plagiarism using Quetext. Copy and paste your text to begin the evaluation and receive results within a few minutes. The plagiarism checker compares your work to large databases of books, web pages, and journals. View your score in the easy to read final report.

tag(s): copyright (46), editing (90), evaluating sources (28), plagiarism (34), writing (317)

In the Classroom

Although the free portion of this site is somewhat limited, it is worth bookmarking and sharing for use by you and your students. Be sure to include a link on your class website for students to use at home. Demonstrate to students how to upload their writing to check for plagiarism as part of your ongoing lessons in intellectual honesty. If their work is longer than 500 words, upload a small portion that needs to be checked instead of the whole project. Often when students are researching and writing a report, they find it difficult to put information in their own words. Ask students to attach their report results to their writing as part of the writing assignment. Encourage them to share reports that indicate plagiarism, with an online bulletin board like Dotstorming, reviewed here, where other students can comment and help them reword the writing. Then, have them discuss steps to take to avoid it happening in the future. Ask students to create video commercials modifying their learning and informing viewers on different aspects of plagiarism. Use a tool such as Powtoon, reviewed here. Share their videos using a tool such as SchoolTube, reviewed here.

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Fair Dealing Decision Tool - Council of Ministers of Education, Canada

Grades
6 to 12
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Encourage and promote proper digital citizenship through the use of the Fair Dealing Decision Tool. Choose the type of published work from options including periodicals, poems, books,...more
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Encourage and promote proper digital citizenship through the use of the Fair Dealing Decision Tool. Choose the type of published work from options including periodicals, poems, books, and more to begin. Answer questions to learn if it is a permissible use of the published work. In addition to the decision tool, this site contains many other resources for teachers including articles and video presentations.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90), ethics (23), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

Include this site as part of your digital citizenship lessons. Explore together what is the acceptable use, and what is not. Enhance classroom technology use by having students create online posters individually or together as a class using a tool such as PicLits, reviewed here, or transform class tech use with a multimedia poster using Web Poster Wizard, reviewed here, or Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, to demonstrate the acceptable use of published work. Be sure to include a link to this tool on your class web page for student use at home.
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Resource Guides - Learning Commons - The University of British Columbia - Vancouver Campus

Grades
5 to 12
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UBC (University of British Columbia) Commons offers several guides for learning and sharing with digital tools. From the top menu click Academic Support, then choose Academic Integrity...more
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UBC (University of British Columbia) Commons offers several guides for learning and sharing with digital tools. From the top menu click Academic Support, then choose Academic Integrity and Citations. Begin by choosing any guide of interest with topics including how to avoid plagiarism and a guide to properly citating online resources. Each guide provides an excellent description of the topic along with related resources and links. Some include videos and a FAQ section. If your district blocks YouTube, the videos may not be viewable.

tag(s): citations (34), copyright (46), creative commons (28), digital citizenship (90), plagiarism (34), Research (83)

In the Classroom

Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard as you share individual topics with students, then create a link on your class website for students to access information at any time. Divide topics among groups of students and enhance or transform classroom technology use and student learning by having each group create a simple or multimedia infographic (depending on teacher requirements or student ability) and share their findings using Venngage, reviewed here. Create a class wiki with resources for using and crediting online tools. Not comfortable with wikis? Check out the TeachersFirst Wiki Walk-Through.
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Cite This For Me - RefME Ltd. (2015)

Grades
8 to 12
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Create bibliographies and works cited with Cite This For Me. The reference styles include Harvard, APA, MLA and thousands of others. Not only can you reference the standard sources...more
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Create bibliographies and works cited with Cite This For Me. The reference styles include Harvard, APA, MLA and thousands of others. Not only can you reference the standard sources (books, videos, etc.), but your sources can also be doctoral dissertations, reports, book chapters, legislation, artwork, and more. Create projects, annotate web pages, and add quotes using the Cite This For Me WebClipper. Scan book and journal barcodes. Sync references across devices. Invite others to collaborate on projects using any device. You can also check your paper for plagiarism!

tag(s): citations (34), Research (83)

In the Classroom

Share with students as a resource for saving and organizing web material. The Webclipper feature allows students to highlight the key information from a page so that a few days down the road they're not wondering why they bookmarked a web page. The bibliography tools help students properly format their Works Cited pages. Use this tool to help keep your students (or even yourself) organized! Make sure you teach plagiarism lessons about paraphrasing and proper citation of sources, so students use this tool properly!

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P.org - iParadigms, LLC & TurnItIn LLC

Grades
6 to 12
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Here you will find everything you will ever need to know about plagiarism and citing sources. Start with the article on the right "What is Plagiarism." Be sure to check ...more
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Here you will find everything you will ever need to know about plagiarism and citing sources. Start with the article on the right "What is Plagiarism." Be sure to check out all the categories from the left menu. There you will find lots of videos and articles regarding citing sources (explains what a citation is), why one should cite sources, how to paraphrase, how to quote material, what a footnote is, and when one should cite the source. There are several interesting videos with titles like "Everything is a Remix." This is a hot topic and definitely a site to save and share with students! Some of the videos reside on YouTube, if your school blocks YouTube they may not be viewable on classroom computers. You could flip your classroom and have the students watch those videos at home.

tag(s): citations (34), plagiarism (34), Research (83), summarizing (22)

In the Classroom

Meet your Common Core standards for nonfiction reading using the pages at this informative site! In addition, every student who creates a report, presentation, speech, or project, in any subject, needs to know this information. Consider dividing and presenting this site with a teacher in another curriculum, so students get the idea that this is information for EVERY class. Modify learning and consider presenting the information, questions, and quizzes using a tool such as Vevox, reviewed here. Vevox will integrate with Microsoft Teams and PowerPoint, and you can have instantaeous question and answer sessions. Then you can quiz students on the information. Moreover, this program will make this text heavy, but necessary material, much more tolerable for your students. You may want to challenge your gifted and musically inclined students to create a rap highlighting the important information they learned about plagiarism and citing sources. Have them teach the rap to the rest of the class. Or enhance learning and have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as WordItOut, reviewed here. If you are flipping your classroom and having students to watch the videos residing on YouTube at home, you may want to use Edpuzzle, reviewed here, to add your own voice or add questions within the video and hold students accountable.

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Academic Help - Academic Help

Grades
6 to 12
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Academic Help offers a collection of writing guides for almost any type of writing need. Scroll down the page to find Featured Tools in topics such as Plagiarism Checker, AI ...more
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Academic Help offers a collection of writing guides for almost any type of writing need. Scroll down the page to find Featured Tools in topics such as Plagiarism Checker, AI Dectector, AI Essay Writer, Paraphraser, Summarizer, and Citation Generator. Next to Featured Tools click on Writing to find an AI Essay Writer, a Lierature Review Generator, Research Paper Generator, and others. Within each category find specific step by step directions for writing in that style. Content on this site includes a copy and paste Plagiarism Checker (5 times for free) and an online Glossary with links to examples. The "ask an expert to check your work" section involves a fee.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): artificial intelligence (110), creative writing (120), descriptive writing (38), expository writing (31), letter writing (18), paragraph writing (15), persuasive writing (55)

In the Classroom

Be sure to bookmark this resource for use throughout the year. Share samples of writing on your interactive whiteboard with students, and explore different types of writing examples together. Be sure to include a link to Academic Help on your class website or blog for students to access from home. After they follow the advice on this site, transform classroom technology use and have students use Ourboox, reviewed here. Ourboox creates beautiful page-flipping digital books in minutes, and you can embed video, music, animation, games, maps and more.

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A Research Guide for Students - A Research Guide

Grades
6 to 12
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Find a complete resource for how to write a research paper, including simple step-by-step directions, suggested resources, and ways to avoid plagiarism. This site also includes how...more
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Find a complete resource for how to write a research paper, including simple step-by-step directions, suggested resources, and ways to avoid plagiarism. This site also includes how to format a research paper, write footnotes, create endnotes, and make parenthetical references, with examples for all. There are tips for public speaking and how to use search engines.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): expository writing (31), literature (218), persuasive writing (55), plagiarism (34), process writing (38), Research (83)

In the Classroom

Use this site on a projector or interactive whiteboard to discuss and informally assess prior knowledge as you start a research project. With younger students, you may want the class to go through each step together before beginning the next step. However, let gifted students work ahead. The beauty of this site is that it is great for classroom differentiation for independent work. With older students, you may want to show them the different steps and have them start where they think they need help and share examples. Be sure to post a link to the site for students and parents to access at home.

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PleaseDon'tCheat - Copyright - New York Online

Grades
5 to 12
9 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Explore the complex topics of copyright and plagiarism. Find information on identifying plagiarism, ethical concerns, and ways to avoid stealing others' material. Explore essential...more
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Explore the complex topics of copyright and plagiarism. Find information on identifying plagiarism, ethical concerns, and ways to avoid stealing others' material. Explore essential questions such as Why Should I Care?, What Does it Look Like?, and How Can I Use My Own Brain? Student tools offer tips for avoiding plagiarism such as correctly citing sources and learning proper phrasing. Teacher tools include videos and posters to help students explore this topic and understand copyright issues. View several videos in the digital ethics portion of the site that discuss the fine line between plagiarism and mashups, downloading, and music use. Some of the videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90), ethics (23), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

This site is a must-have in the toolbox for all secondary teachers. Bookmark and save this site to use for discussion questions and factual information on plagiarism. Share the videos on your projector or interactive whiteboard. View a video each week and discuss contents. View specific videos addressing concerns that arise in your classroom. Share this site with parents at meet the teacher (Back to School) night for their use at home. Share a link to the site on a prominent place on your class website or blog for student reference at any time.

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YouTube Copyright School - YouTube

Grades
4 to 12
2 Favorites 1  Comments
 
This short animated YouTube clip shares specific copyright issues, focusing on reusing previously developed materials available on the Internet by uploading and presenting them on YouTube....more
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This short animated YouTube clip shares specific copyright issues, focusing on reusing previously developed materials available on the Internet by uploading and presenting them on YouTube. It begins with a written quiz on the right side of the page to assess prior knowledge and also to get viewers thinking about copyright issues. It presents the message that uploading copyrighted material onto YouTube can have serious consequences. It also explores the fact that, in addition to written and broadcast media, performances and other public presentations may also be copyrighted. It explains the concept of Fair Use in easy-to-understand terms and examples. It also points out that you may watch for people who misuse material and report any such items so they will be removed from YouTube. The video is hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then it may not be viewable.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): copyright (46), multimedia (43), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

Use this site on a projector or interactive whiteboard to discuss and informally assess prior knowledge as you start your study of plagiarism on writing projects or copyright in general. Use it in art or music classes when discussing the use of "derivative works" or performance rights on music. Include this site on your class webpage for students and parents to access as a reference. To show what they have learned from this site, enhance or transform (depending on teacher requirements) class room technology use by challenging students to create an online infographic about copyright to share using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here.

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openverse - Word Press - Creative Commons

Grades
4 to 12
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Find digital images that are available for use without violating copyright. This search tool finds images licensed for use under Creative Commons licensing. While most major search...more
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Find digital images that are available for use without violating copyright. This search tool finds images licensed for use under Creative Commons licensing. While most major search engines have advanced features that allow you to filter out content by copyright privileges, the CC search website makes it easy and convenient. Be sure to READ the information about verifying licensing. The results provide extensive options that can be legally (and ethically) used in wikis, blogs, reports, and more, as long as you provide the attribution information. What a fabulous tool for students to use for interactive or traditional projects!

tag(s): air (105), copyright (46), creative commons (28)

In the Classroom

Teaching students to understand and respect copyright of digital information can be difficult and overwhelming. The first step in helping students understand digital copyright is to get them to explore the terms of use and copyright of a variety of information. Create a scavenger hunt for students to find the terms of service and/or copyright for common websites. Once they realize that not all information is "free" for them to use, introduce the Creative Commons website and the symbols that are used to describe how the content is licensed by the owner. Use an interactive whiteboard or projector to demonstrate searching using the CC search site. Perform searches that yield results that show several different types of licenses. Discuss each type using scenarios of how the information can and cannot be used. As an extension activity for this site, students can create their own work and publish the work using a creative commons license. The work can be as simple as using a digital picture or as complex as creating their own derivative artwork, such as a collage or "photoshopped" image. It can be published on a commercial site such as flickr or on your school webpage. Make sure to follow any school guidelines before publishing student work. Perhaps you can create a class wiki of annotated creative images created by students with explanations of where they found the "parts" and how they created the original works from these parts. What a wonderful model to share with future students, as well. Teachers will also appreciate being able to find images you can freely use on class web pages and in online project samples, etc. (with attribution).

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21st Century Information Fluency - 21CIF

Grades
3 to 12
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Students use the Internet for everything from research to purchasing music, but do they really know how to search effectively, critically evaluate information, and cite their sources...more
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Students use the Internet for everything from research to purchasing music, but do they really know how to search effectively, critically evaluate information, and cite their sources using ethical standards? The 21st Century Information Fluency website has a wide spectrum of resources for both students and teachers to learn and practice these skills. As High School students are required to do more in depth research and the topics they study become more complex, the need for information fluency/literacy becomes more important. This site includes tutorials, tools, and wizards for students to learn and practice the skills they need to navigate digital environments effectively efficiently and ethically. The vast array of content and information available can be adjusted for curriculum topics and the grade level of the students. There are also opportunities for professional development for teachers to improve their own information fluency skills. Don't miss the wizards to cite sources in various styles of documentation. Activities are aligned to ISTE's NETS-S standards. Begin by reading "How to use this site" and be sure to explore the many "kits." Some materials are for sale, but much is free. The site organization is confusing, so bookmark favorite areas to return easily! New to the site is a game called Bad Apple that helps you determine good and verifiable resources from those that are not.

tag(s): copyright (46), digital citizenship (90), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

This site is deep and robust and should be explored thoroughly before using it with students. As you approach a research project, plan to include some of these lessons as part of that project. Ideally, team with other teachers at your school/level to require consistent standards of research as taught through this site, but be sure you know which teachers and classes will help the students master them first! This is one to save in your favorites for repeat visits. Be sure to review the Bad Apple game with your class on a whiteboard or with an overhead projector.

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Teaching Copyright - Electronic Frontier Foundation

Grades
6 to 12
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Scroll to find the menu on the left side of this page, and find five lessons for students to review what they know about plagiarism and copyright and update it ...more
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Scroll to find the menu on the left side of this page, and find five lessons for students to review what they know about plagiarism and copyright and update it to include aspects of copying in the digital age. In addition to the history of copyright (with application to proper documentation and annotation), students learn about concepts such as fair use, free speech, peer-to-peer file sharing, and the public domain. The most in-depth portions are definitions and history of copyright, the concepts of fair use and stakeholders, and finally, contemporary explanations of the interpretation of copyright today including material on the internet. The lessons include Notes for the Educator, Assessment, Extension Ideas, Objectives, and many other possible resources. Each lesson varies slightly in the additions.

tag(s): copyright (46), plagiarism (34)

In the Classroom

Use when teaching essay writing and how to cite sources. Plan a unit on plagiarism using the resources on this site or incorporate them into your existing research units. Introduce this site on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then have students do the activities on this site independently or in small groups. The culminating activity here is a trial; plan to use this with the entire class with each member having a distinct role.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Tales from the Public Domain: Bound By Law - Center for the Study of the Public Domain (Duke Law)

Grades
9 to 12
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An online, interactive graphic novel (formerly known as comic book) created at Duke Law explains the highly-sophisticated concepts of "public domain" and other intellectual property...more
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An online, interactive graphic novel (formerly known as comic book) created at Duke Law explains the highly-sophisticated concepts of "public domain" and other intellectual property issues related to using film clips, artwork, Broadway shows, and more in a documentary. In the digital world of the 21st century, copyright is a concept most foreign to our students, and this interactive book may only fan the flames of their outrage at such limitations to the "rights" they perceive in today's connected world. As one panel in the book itself says, "To many artists, the question of 'Fair Use' can seem like a game of blind man's bluff." These concepts are very challenging, even to adults, but this interactive comic book can at least alert users to what some of the legal issues involved with intellectual property may be. The nitty-gritty of Public Domain starts on page nine.

tag(s): air (105), copyright (46), media literacy (103)

In the Classroom

Since this content requires concentration and understanding of concepts beyond the typical high schooler, you may want to share selected frames from the book on your interactive whiteboard or projector as discussion starters or inspiration for debate on copyright issues. Whether you are introducing a research project that requires adherence to Fair Use and proper documentation, are coaching a debate team, or prompting a piece of persuasive writing on this hot topic, this resource will provide fodder for discussion. Don't expect mastery of the legal concept, but you will certainly hear opinions as students navigate this "book."

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Podcasting Legal Guide - Creative Commons

Grades
6 to 12
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Just because you can record a person's voice doesn't mean you can publish it on the web. Here's a site that outlines the basics of U.S. laws regarding copyright and ...more
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Just because you can record a person's voice doesn't mean you can publish it on the web. Here's a site that outlines the basics of U.S. laws regarding copyright and publicity as they relate to user-created podcasts. You'll learn about which things are OK, which require permission, and other pointers to consider when creating podcasts for school or educational uses. There is a PDF version of this site available at the top of the page.

tag(s): air (105), copyright (46), podcasts (79)

In the Classroom

If your class is set to "publish" their recorded exploits, working through this site with them would be a great introduction to the "rules of the road" for journalists in general.

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Understanding Fair Use - University of Minnesota

Grades
1 to 12
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Understanding and applying the Doctrine of Fair Use is vital for teachers and students at all levels. This site clearly explains important exemptions that limit the exclusive rights...more
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Understanding and applying the Doctrine of Fair Use is vital for teachers and students at all levels. This site clearly explains important exemptions that limit the exclusive rights of copyright holders and provides analysis of the four factors of Fair Use.

tag(s): copyright (46)

In the Classroom

Introduce this site to the class with a projector or whiteboard, and then replace pencil and paper notecards by having partners read this and take notes with an online tool such as Memo Notepad, reviewed here; tell students to be sure to save the URL to share their notes and questions with you and their peers. Next, at the end of your copyright and fair use unit, modify student learning by challenging them to demonstrate their learning by creating an inforgraphic using Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here.

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