TeachersFirst's Constitution Day Resources

Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections

This collection of reviewed resources from TeachersFirst is selected to help teachers and students learn about the United States Constitution and to plan projects and classroom activities so students can experience the Constitution as a "living document." Whether you spend one class in celebration of Constitution Day or an entire unit on the Constitution, the ideas included in the "In the Classroom" portion of reviews will launch discussions and projects your students will not forget.

 

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Constitutional Rights - Constitution Center

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7 to 12
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Explore the rights that the United States shares with other countries around the world with this interactive from the Constitution Center. Begin by selecting a constitutional right...more
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Explore the rights that the United States shares with other countries around the world with this interactive from the Constitution Center. Begin by selecting a constitutional right from the list next to the globe to highlight the countries that also include that right for their citizens. Select any highlighted country to compare their version with the U.S. In addition to sharing the text from each country, this interactive includes the percentage of text with content that matches between the two chosen countries.

tag(s): bill of rights (26), constitution (92), countries (84), cross cultural understanding (151)

In the Classroom

Include this interactive with any lessons on constitutional rights or when studying different nations. Create a Padlet, reviewed here, for your class to add and comment on constitutional rights around the world. Create columns on your Padlet by country or specific rights, then ask students to share information and articles detailing information on that right. Use an online news site like World News, reviewed here, for students to find news from around the world and search by regions. Challenge computer-savvy students to create a game using Scratch, reviewed here, that takes players around the world to learn about rights and freedoms found in different nations. Ask other students to create podcasts discussing current events and freedoms from around the world. Buzzsprout, reviewed here, is an excellent podcast creation tool and includes features for adding links and lists to shows, and allows users to schedule podcast releases for specific dates and times.

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Race to Ratify - iCivics

Grades
5 to 12
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Can you be a ratification #influencer? That is the goal of this game where players land back in time to the year 1787 and fight to ratify the newly proposed ...more
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Can you be a ratification #influencer? That is the goal of this game where players land back in time to the year 1787 and fight to ratify the newly proposed Constitution using the social media of the time - pamphlets. Select from two different game modes - historical and free play. Talk with friends and dissenters as you travel across the 13 states to hear different opinions and attempt to influence others to your point of view. Earn tokens along the way to use in interviews and pamphlets. Although login and registration are available on the site, they aren't necessary to play the game. The educator login gives access to the extension pack that provides additional context and materials for using the game in classrooms.

tag(s): 1700s (32), branches of government (61), colonial america (108), constitution (92), game based learning (157)

In the Classroom

Demonstrate the basic concepts of the challenge on your interactive whiteboard or projector. Then allow students to play on their own on the whiteboard or classroom computers, keeping a log of their actions and results. Enhance learning by having students share interactions from the game in comic form using ToonyTool, reviewed here. Ask students to use ToonyTool to create a conversation with the game's character trying to persuade an anti-Federalist or another opponent on the virtues of the Constitution. Use the game as inspiration for students to extend their learning by creating their own history game using Scratch, reviewed here. For ideas and inspiration, use the search feature in Scratch to find examples of history games created by other users.

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Essential Questions in Teaching American History - Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History & John McNamara

Grades
7 to 12
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This document contains 163 essential questions for guiding instruction in American History. Question topics range from broad concepts like "Do political parties serve the public interest...more
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This document contains 163 essential questions for guiding instruction in American History. Question topics range from broad concepts like "Do political parties serve the public interest and further the cause of democracy?" to more focused topics such as " Was the Great Depression inevitable?" Be sure to check out the related site content included on the page to find other information available on the Gilder Lehrman Institute website.

tag(s): 1800s (55), 1900s (48), american revolution (87), civil rights (133), civil war (150), cold war (31), constitution (92), elections (71), great depression (29), russia (37), terrorism (46), world war 1 (57), world war 2 (145)

In the Classroom

Although it appears simple, this document is an excellent resource to bookmark for anyone who teaches American History. Print and save this document to focus on essential questions as you plan your lessons. Consider using an online platform like Actively Learn , reviewed here, to find and share quality lessons and learning activities with your students as they relate to these essential questions. To enhance learning and classroom technology, ask students to respond to questions found on this list by creating a website using Jimdo, reviewed here, and include their response along with supporting material including documents, videos, and more. Ask individual students or groups to modify technology use by creating a timeline of events using Timeline JS, reviewed here, to visualize and document events based on the essential questions. For example, if answering "Was the Great Depression inevitable?" ask students to build a timeline including important causes including World War 1, bank failures, the Dust Bowl, and more to demonstrate the many causes of the Great Depression.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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United States Courts Educational Resources - Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts

Grades
8 to 12
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Discover a wide variety of educational resources and interactive lessons teaching about the United States court system and Constitution. Choose the Educational Activities section to...more
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Discover a wide variety of educational resources and interactive lessons teaching about the United States court system and Constitution. Choose the Educational Activities section to find lessons based on Constitutional Amendments and the U.S. Court of Appeals. Within each of the different areas of this section are several activities that include a downloadable activity package for educators. Explore landmark Supreme Court cases and participate in interactive activities including a simulation of the Supreme Court decision making process.

tag(s): branches of government (61), constitution (92), supreme court (24)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of these free resources and activities to use in your social studies classroom when teaching about the U.S. Constitution. Instead of asking students to take individual notes throughout your lessons, take advantage of Google documents to create shared notes. Ask students to highlight and annotate important information shared. Use Wakelet, reviewed here to create "wakes" for students to organize information. Add websites, documents, videos, and more to any wake for students to access information in one site. As a final project, challenge students to use a video explanation tool like Rawshorts, reviewed here to share the background and information learned about Supreme Court cases and decisions.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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That's Your Right - Annenberg Classroom

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5 to 12
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Learn about the Bill of Rights by playing this challenging card game. Click start to view the tutorial and choose to play from the single or multiplayer options. Choose from ...more
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Learn about the Bill of Rights by playing this challenging card game. Click start to view the tutorial and choose to play from the single or multiplayer options. Choose from three different levels of difficulty to begin play. The goal of the game is to gain freedom by collecting and matching scenario cards to features of the Bill of Rights as you play.

tag(s): bill of rights (26), branches of government (61), constitution (92), game based learning (157)

In the Classroom

Include this game with any lessons on the Bill of Rights. Challenge students to compete against each other and move up through the different levels of difficulty. Include the site with your other resources on a bookmarking site like SearchTeam, reviewed here. SearchTeam includes the option to add and share notes with bookmarks, add teaching notes for your future use or if sharing with students, ask them to add tips into the comments section. Upon completion of your unit, enhance learning by having students create animated videos using Powtoon, reviewed here, to share their understanding of the Bill of Rights.

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My Case Maker - Bean Creative

Grades
6 to 8
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My Case Maker is a collection of 20 civics challenges for middle school students. Share individual challenges with students using the provided Challenge Code. Once students access the...more
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My Case Maker is a collection of 20 civics challenges for middle school students. Share individual challenges with students using the provided Challenge Code. Once students access the challenge, the site offers tools for adding annotations and creating case folders. Once complete, students use information as a reference for other assignments or share their work using the site's presentation mode feature. If desired, use your free My Case Maker account to modify text and associated primary sources within challenges before sharing with students.

tag(s): black history (73), civil rights (133), constitution (92), democracy (16), elections (71), freedom of speech (12), immigrants (25), immigration (65), media literacy (86), politics (103), Research (31), world war 2 (145)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free materials on this site to encourage debate and discussion within your current civics lessons. Each lesson includes primary sources to use when responding to prompts; ask students to find and share additional primary sources to include with their response to each question. Instead of just creating a list of additional resources, enhance student learning and classroom technology use by sharing additional resources using Padlet, reviewed here. Padlet offers features for adding comments; ask students to use this feature to indicate important information found on the document. Enhance learning further by finding and sharing videos that support the topic being discussed. Use EdPuzzle, reviewed here, to add comments and question prompts for students. Upon completion of student projects, have them share their thoughts through a podcast featuring students' challenge solutions. Be sure to include a group of students in each podcast featuring various points of view and their backup documentation.

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Interactive Constitution - National Constitution Center

Grades
6 to 12
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Learn about the United States Constitution through discussions from constitutional experts and their thoughts on how the Constitution's history has implications for today. Begin by...more
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Learn about the United States Constitution through discussions from constitutional experts and their thoughts on how the Constitution's history has implications for today. Begin by selecting an article or amendment to view the wording contained in the Constitution, along with at least one feature discussing the specific impact of that piece. At the end of each article, go further in-depth with additional presentations titled Matters of Debate. These selections present two different interpretations about the legal applications of the specific portion of the Constitution within society.

tag(s): colonial america (108), constitution (92), philadelphia (13)

In the Classroom

Include this site with any lessons on the Constitution. Share on your interactive whiteboard to help students understand the meaning behind each article and amendment. Take your research into the Constitution a step further and have students compile bookmarks containing videos and online articles to use for research. Surfmark, reviewed here, is a bookmarking tool that allows students to collaborate through annotations and highlighting of text. It also has a browser bookmarklet to add to your toolbar for easy use. Have students or student groups create explainer videos to tell the history of the Constitution or explain articles or amendments. Modify classroom technology use by using a tool like Raw Shorts, reviewed here, to create animated short videos.

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America Goes to War: an Infographic - New England College

Grades
8 to 12
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What does it mean to go to war? This simple infographic shows the Constitutional process by which the United States declares war, traces the history of each of the U.S. ...more
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What does it mean to go to war? This simple infographic shows the Constitutional process by which the United States declares war, traces the history of each of the U.S. declarations of war, and differentiates among formal declarations, military actions, and Presidential or Congressional authorizations of force.

tag(s): civil war (150), congress (44), constitution (92), presidents (130), war of 1812 (15), world war 1 (57), world war 2 (145)

In the Classroom

Was the U.S. at war? What powers does the U.S. President have to declare war, and how have Presidents used those powers historically? A powerful, but simple infographic delineates the legal and Constitutional differences among U.S. wars historically. Share the infographic on an interactive whiteboard, or embed on your classroom website for reference.

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60-Second Civics - The Center for Civic Education

Grades
7 to 12
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60 Second Civics offers podcasts covering one important concept at a time in 60-second narratives. They are updated daily. Short Attention Span? This site is perfect for you! There...more
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60 Second Civics offers podcasts covering one important concept at a time in 60-second narratives. They are updated daily. Short Attention Span? This site is perfect for you! There are nearly 2000 podcasts to explore. You can subscribe to the podcast series through an RSS feed, on iTunes, or access them directly through the website. Unfortunately, they do not seem to be searchable by theme or content, so you'll just need to scroll through them if you're looking for a specific topic or issue. Tip: when you hover your cursor over the word PLAY, it doesn't change to a pointing hand. Click on the word anyway to start the podcast. 60-Second Civics is part of a larger site that contains lesson plans, teacher resources, video clips, and a photo gallery on all aspects of citizenship.

tag(s): bill of rights (26), branches of government (61), constitution (92)

In the Classroom

Need a quick lesson starter or attention grabber at the beginning or end of each class? Try a 60-second Civics lesson. If you access the day's podcast via the website, you'll also find a one-question multiple choice quiz that relates to the podcast so you can check for content acquisition. These podcasts are perfect for a civics or government class! Share the podcasts on your projector (or interactive whiteboard) so the entire class can hear the podcast and see the quiz at the end. If you are the adviser for the school news program, these would be a terrific addition, ready to go for you every day. During the run-up to Consitution Day in September, include these in the morning PA announcements. Load the podcast on iTouches or other mobile devices in the media center for students to browse and learn. Encourage students to create their own "stump the teacher" or "stump the student citizen" quizzes based on these podcasts. Use one of the many poll/quiz tools in the TeachersFirst Edge.

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CurriConnects Booklist: By the People - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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Find books about how our U.S. government works and how to take part in that process. These books include topics such as what it means to be a citizen, how ...more
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Find books about how our U.S. government works and how to take part in that process. These books include topics such as what it means to be a citizen, how our government works, and the tough decisions that people make -- both citizens and those who work in government. Discover civics-related topics such as voting, creating laws, enforcing laws, and the underlying principles of democracy. The collection includes both true and fictional tales about communities and government and books for all grade levels. CurriConnects thematic book lists include ISBN numbers for ordering or searching, interest grade levels, ESL levels and Lexiles''''® to match student independent reading levels to challenge, not frustrate. For more on text complexity and Lexiles''''®, see this information from the Lexile Framework. Don't miss other CurriConnects themes being added regularly. If your library does not have the books, try interlibrary loan!

tag(s): book lists (129), branches of government (61), congress (44), constitution (92), presidents (130)

In the Classroom

Encourage students to select independent reading from this list as part of a citizenship unit, as a focus for Constitution Day, or in a civics/government class.

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Constitution Day - ConstitutionDay.com

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5 to 12
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Learn about the U.S. Constitution and the amendments. See the documents and short biographies of each of the founding fathers. Click links to images of the Constitution on the right...more
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Learn about the U.S. Constitution and the amendments. See the documents and short biographies of each of the founding fathers. Click links to images of the Constitution on the right side of the home page. Although this site is short on original content, the founding father biographies make it a worthwhile visit when studying the Constitution and figures in American History.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): bill of rights (26), biographies (92), colonial america (108), constitution (92), philadelphia (13)

In the Classroom

Share this site with students as a resource for reading and viewing the Constitution. Challenge students to develop a fake social media presence about one of the founding fathers using Fakebook, reviewed here, or the Twitter Fictional Account Template, reviewed here. This is a great resource for Constitution Day!

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American Scraps - Jon White Studio

Grades
6 to 12
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Today's Document is an excellent daily history site based on an RSS feed from the National Archives. This specific page comes up on Constitution Day. Cartoons illustrate the history...more
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Today's Document is an excellent daily history site based on an RSS feed from the National Archives. This specific page comes up on Constitution Day. Cartoons illustrate the history of the document, and link each drawing to the original, primary source document on National Archives with an invitation to dig deeper. Search the archives for previous entries or scroll back through daily cartoons. Explanations often include links to further historical information or click on included tags for similar resources. This site includes documents for several days each month. The site seems to have stopped in 2010, but you can browse back through many valuable documents and explanations, since the "originals" being discussed are historic, not current.

tag(s): american revolution (87), civil war (150), constitution (92), jefferson (21), lincoln (79), presidents (130), segregation (16), washington (27)

In the Classroom

Today's Document would make a fantastic discussion starter in any classroom. It is an interesting, visual way for students to acquire background knowledge about American history and/or the Constitution and government. You may want to display a document on your interactive whiteboard as a bell-ringer (opener) activity, or as a story starter in English class. Cover up the cartoon explanation, and ask students to discuss events that they think took place. In U.S.history, government, or civics classes, use the site as an example, then challenge students to create their own comics to explain a topic using comic-creation tools from this TeachersFirst collection.

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Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States - Teaching American History

Grades
6 to 12
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Students are ordinarily much more familiar with the signing of the Declaration of Independence than the signing of the Constitution, even though the signing of the Constitution may...more
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Students are ordinarily much more familiar with the signing of the Declaration of Independence than the signing of the Constitution, even though the signing of the Constitution may arguably be the more important event. A painting by Howard Chandler Christy documents the event, and this site provides an interactive look at the characters depicted in the painting. There is also a link to more information about the painting, which is one of the most historically accurate paintings of the founding of our country, despite the fact that it does not actually depict all of the signers. A number of other resource links may be worth pursuing for further information.

tag(s): constitution (92)

In the Classroom

A great resource for the interactive whiteboard or projector, although be aware that you may need to disable your pop-up blocker to get the information to display properly. Challenge students to find other paintings depicting famous events in United States (or another country). Have cooperative learning groups create multimedia presentation about the paintings. Create fictitious blog entries from one character in a painting to another character within another painting at another famous event. What would John F. Kennedy write to Benjamin Franklin?
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Annenberg Classroom - NPR/NY Times

Grades
6 to 12
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This collaborative website focuses on controversial contemporary issues, including juvenile justice, eco-topics, gun control, women's rights, voting rights, civil liberties in war,...more
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This collaborative website focuses on controversial contemporary issues, including juvenile justice, eco-topics, gun control, women's rights, voting rights, civil liberties in war, and affirmative action. Help students understand the role of the news media in a democracy. This website combines the radio broadcast resources of Justice Talking and written articles and features from the NY Times Learning Network. Lesson plans corresponding to each "hot topic" offer social studies, language arts, and science teachers opportunities to connect the real news with topics in their curricula. A glossary of words important to the democratic process and a link to the Constitution with a "what it says, what it means" feature allow students to understand authentic sources as well as historical references. "In Their Own Words" (accessible from the Site Guide) provides primary source documents and statements from each of the three branches of government, from the press, and from schools.

tag(s): civil rights (133), ecology (136), radio (27), women (104)

In the Classroom

Use this site to help students explore the branches of government in action as they address a "hot topic." Have groups of students listen to real broadcasts and analyze the issues as examples of the constitutional concepts you are studying. Make this link available from your teacher web page while studying the Constitution, the branches of government, and many other social studies topics. Use your interactive whiteboard or projection screen to share a video or audio clip to spark discussion on an issue or activate your lesson. Then, divide your class into teams and have a class debate about the issue. Have students prepare a pro/con wiki using links to the primary sources to support their position or create their own podcast commentaries with support for their opinions.

Comments

Too many resources to even summarize. I can't wait to share this resource. CONSTITUTION ON SEPT. 17. Patricia, NJ, Grades: 6 - 12

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Teacher's Portal - American Bar Association

Grades
6 to 12
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Each year, teachers are asked to observe Constitution Day with special instruction on one of the United States' founding documents. This site provides sample lesson plans and resources,...more
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Each year, teachers are asked to observe Constitution Day with special instruction on one of the United States' founding documents. This site provides sample lesson plans and resources, for all grade levels, including some flash-enabled interactive lessons and activities on specific aspects of the application of the Constitution.

tag(s): bill of rights (26), constitution (92)

In the Classroom

Use the lesson plan suggestions to meet the mandate for instruction on Constitution Day, but be sure and check out the other resources for lessons on civics, government, current events and the Constitution itself. The section called "Dialogues" provides resources to engage students and community members in discussion of fundamental American legal principles and civic traditions.
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The Supreme Court: Games - PBS

Grades
9 to 12
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Although this site is no longer maintained, most links are working. As a supplement to their series on The Supreme Court, PBS has prepared nine interactive modules on various aspects...more
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Although this site is no longer maintained, most links are working. As a supplement to their series on The Supreme Court, PBS has prepared nine interactive modules on various aspects of the high court. Although they are called "games" most are simply interactive lessons on topics including a quiz on the constitution, information on the symbols used by the court to illustrate its importance to the US system of government, civil rights rulings, specific justices of note, and landmark cases. For reasons not immediately apparent, one of the interactives requires registration with an email address and password. Rather than using your personal or work email, create a free Gmail account to use for memberships. If you plan to have students register individually, you may want to create your own Gmail account with up to 20 subaccounts for each group of students (by code name or number) within your classes. Here is a blog post that tells how to set up GMail subaccounts to use for any online membership service. There are also links to educator resources and lesson plans.

tag(s): civil rights (133), constitution (92), supreme court (24)

In the Classroom

These lessons would be useful on an interactive whiteboard or projector along with a unit on the Supreme Court or the US judicial system. Students might also use them to to extend or enrich the topic on their own time, or when they have completed other classwork. They are well researched and informative, however, most students won't view them as "games" as they are labeled. Have cooperative learning groups investigate one specific topic and share their discoveries with the class. Challenge students to create a video using Powtoon, reviewed here, and it share using a site such as SchoolTube, reviewed here.
 This resource requires Adobe Flash.

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Argument Wars - iCivics Inc.

Grades
5 to 10
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This site offers a creative way to teach landmark Supreme Court cases. The site provides five historical court cases for students to argue. Each case is a separate interactive. In ...more
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This site offers a creative way to teach landmark Supreme Court cases. The site provides five historical court cases for students to argue. Each case is a separate interactive. In each activity, students play a lawyer who represents one side in the case. Using supporting documents, students must choose the best argument for the side they are representing. New to Argument Wars are the Extension Packs that add relevance for students through PowerPoint slides. Students "win" the game and case if they score more points than their computer generated opponent.

tag(s): constitution (92), game based learning (157), supreme court (24)

In the Classroom

This site is great way to review the amendments of the US Constitution. Using an interactive whiteboard or projector, complete one case as a whole group so students can see how the interactive should work. Use the provided handouts so students can take notes as you are working through the case. When it is time for students to work independently, make a shortcut to this site on classroom computers and use it as a center. Divide students into cooperative learning groups to explore the site. Afterward have a discussion or have students journal using the provided discussion questions. Why not create a "Argument Wars Wiki" to discuss the cases. Not comfortable with wikis? Have no wiki worries - check out the TeachersFirst's Wiki Walk-Through. This site does not have a save feature so students have to complete the entire activity to see if they've won. For students that need more of a challenge, assign them Gideon v. Wainwright. Students have to examine two arguments which makes it more challenging.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Do I Have a Right? - iCivics Inc.

Grades
5 to 10
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In this interactive role playing game, students take on the role of a lawyer starting a new business. Students take on cases, hire lawyers and try to grow their business. ...more
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In this interactive role playing game, students take on the role of a lawyer starting a new business. Students take on cases, hire lawyers and try to grow their business. To be successful, they must understand constitutional amendments. Students can earn prestige points by successfully interacting with clients and winning cases. In order to have a thriving law practice, students have to hire lawyers that are familiar with various amendments. Lesson plans and after-activity PowerPoints are provided.

tag(s): constitution (92), game based learning (157)

In the Classroom

This site is great way to review the amendments of the US Constitution. Make a shortcut to this site on classroom computers and use it as a center. Divide students into cooperative learning groups to explore the site. Working in groups have a class competition to see who can win the most cases and achieve the most prestige points. Afterward, have a discussion about the process each group used to build their law firm. This site does not have a save feature so the teacher should set a duration for play. Built in help makes this site useful for students who might need some additional guidance. Use the final score printout to assign your students a grade.

To fully involve students in their "law firm," have them create a firm logo and "shingle" using an online graphics tool such as Supalogo, reviewed here. Print the logos for classroom decorations or have students upload them to law firm pages on on your class wiki.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Constitutionfacts.com - Oak Hill Publishing

Grades
K to 12
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In spite of the endless verbiage on the home page, this site has many options for topics ranging from the United States Constitution and Amendments to the Supreme Court. ...more
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In spite of the endless verbiage on the home page, this site has many options for topics ranging from the United States Constitution and Amendments to the Supreme Court. Each topic has an overview, sub-topics, and then quizzes to test your knowledge. Dive further in and there is a Fun Zone for treasure hunts, crossword puzzles, and even which founding father are you! On some of the surveys and quizzes it may prompt you for an age and state but it's optional. You can just click the link to see the results and bypass the personal information. Most of this site is designed for older elementary students (and above). However, some of the Constitution Day activities may be useful in the K-2 classrooms.

tag(s): bill of rights (26)

In the Classroom

This is a great site for both introducing and reinforcing topics about the Constitution. Teachers can print out crosswords puzzles for a "What Do I Know" activity. Students could find out which founding father they are in the interactive portion and create a multimedia project on the result. Challenge students to use ThingLink, reviewed here. This site allows users to narrate a picture. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to be reproduced), and then narrate the photo. What a new twist to an oral report! Students could create a Photostory on their own version of the Story of Fourth of July. The possibilities are endless. For fun, teachers can present the Real or Fake Quiz on the projector or interactive whiteboard as whole class instruction or have discussions after each answer.
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Centuries of Citizenship: A Constitutional Timeline - National Constitution Center

Grades
5 to 12
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This interactive timeline is a historical experience that explains the key events of the U.S. Constitution. The events begin with the Magna Carta in 1215 and continue to 2009. Use ...more
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This interactive timeline is a historical experience that explains the key events of the U.S. Constitution. The events begin with the Magna Carta in 1215 and continue to 2009. Use the broadband interactive timeline to give your students the ultimate experience. Students can explore primary documents, view maps and graphs, hear audio clips, listen to debates, read pertinent stories in the New York Times, and learn who had the right to vote during specific time periods. Be sure to also visit the Interactive Constitution. Search the Constitution by keywords, topics, or court cases. This website is definitely worth the visit!

tag(s): bill of rights (26), constitution (92)

In the Classroom

Use this website to engage your students to learn more about different eras of U.S. History. Challenge students to debate the issues found in "Point Counterpoint." Use the primary sources to discuss relevant historical issues or how the problems presented might be found in current events. Use the interactive U.S. Constitution to help with your Constitution Day activities. A link to a PDF file of the entire U.S. Constitution is available. Have students create a multimedia presentation using Thinglink, reviewed here. Thinglink allows you to narrate a picture and add multimedia. Challenge students to find a photo (legally permitted to be reproduced), and then narrate the photo as if it is a news report about the U.S. Constitution. Thinglink can be used for a variety of assignments in any classroom that is integrating technology as an enhancement, modification, or transformation
  This resource requires Adobe Flash and PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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