TeachersFirst's Resources for Self-Identity

Other TeachersFirst Special Topics Collections

Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy self-esteem about their own self-identity, without devaluing the dignity of those that may be different than they are. The resources shared in this section help teachers to enable students to recognize that people have multiple identities and are members of multiple groups within our society, creating complex and unique individuals. 

 

0-19 of 19 

19 Results | sort by:

Less
More

7 Easy Activities That Encourage Students to Open Up About Identity and Privilege - Jodi Tandet

Grades
8 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Foster discussions on diversity, identity, and privilege with the seven activities shared in this article. In addition to specific activities, the author also discusses methods for...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Foster discussions on diversity, identity, and privilege with the seven activities shared in this article. In addition to specific activities, the author also discusses methods for making the activities more inclusive and how to debrief to promote self-reflection among students. Each activity description includes the purpose of the activity, instructions, the key debrief question, and a bonus inclusion tip.

tag(s): character education (68), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Include activities from this article to get to know your students or as part of character education lessons that focus on diversity, identity, and privilege. Be sure to take advantage of the tips that offer suggestions for including all students, especially those with disabilities such as vision, hearing, or mobile impairments. Some activities, such as the fourth one, include vocabulary that may or may not be familiar to students. Enhance learning by creating word clouds using WordClouds, reviewed here, that encourage students to brainstorm concepts associated with these terms.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

5 Powerful lesson ideas to help students find self-identity - Lucie Renard

Grades
5 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Encourage students to reflect upon and understand their self-identity with five lessons adapted from Katja Schipperheijn's book, Digital Citizen. Lesson activities encourage students...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Encourage students to reflect upon and understand their self-identity with five lessons adapted from Katja Schipperheijn's book, Digital Citizen. Lesson activities encourage students to share opinions, consider their interests and expertise, and introduce themselves to others using only 250 characters.

tag(s): character education (68), identity (21), professional development (268)

In the Classroom

Use ideas found in this article to encourage students to reflect upon their self-identity and reflect upon how they want to be viewed by others. The fifth lesson suggests using Bitmoji, reviewed here, to build avatars to reflect self-image. Incorporate this activity with the 250 character response to extend learning and tie together students' physical identity ideas with their concept of what makes them unique. Use Canva Edu, reviewed here, and have students upload their Bitmoji and response to create a flyer that introduces them to others.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Promoting A Sense Of Self: Experiences And Activities - Virtual Lab School

Grades
K to 1
5 Favorites 0  Comments
  
Learn how to support and encourage children by understanding anti-bias teaching methods that recognize and support individual student needs with this self-paced professional development...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Learn how to support and encourage children by understanding anti-bias teaching methods that recognize and support individual student needs with this self-paced professional development lesson. Learning activities include embracing diversity, multiple social identities, and embracing character through understanding the six pillars of character education. This lesson also includes strategies for strengthening family relationships and ideas for developing student interests through short and long-term projects.

tag(s): bias (15), bullying (56), character education (68), diversity (37), identity (21), professional development (268)

In the Classroom

Share this lesson with your peers to use as a learning opportunity or review the included ideas to support students' identity and awareness of others' diversity. Consider sharing a link to this article with parents to help them develop skills for discussing character issues and diversity at home. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to share this article with parents and curate other information from a variety of resources to support and provide education with dealing with character education issues at home.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Lesson Plan: Exploring Identity - Cari Ladd

Grades
9 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
What makes up an individual's identity? This lesson plan includes video clips to introduce identity and then culminates with students creating a self-portrait using items or elements...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

What makes up an individual's identity? This lesson plan includes video clips to introduce identity and then culminates with students creating a self-portrait using items or elements that share key aspects of their self-identity. Note: this is an archived version of the lesson plan found on PBS POV (Points of View), and the video links are not available on PBS. However, they are available by searching on YouTube and using each video's title to find and use the video in your lesson.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (68), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Incorporate this lesson into your current study units related to learning about identity, differences between people, bias, and character education. Use this lesson with younger students by finding videos with students that are the approximate age of those in your class. The lesson includes a study guide to accompany the videos, use edpuzzle, reviewed here, as an alternative to a paper worksheet by adding questions and comments to appropriate areas within each video. As students complete their self-portraits, add them to a class book created using Book Creator, reviewed here. In addition to a picture of each self-portrait, ask students to create a short video sharing and discussing the characteristics they identify as important to their identity. Share your book with students in lower grade levels to help them learn how to celebrate differences in others.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Identity and Characteristics Lesson - Equality and Human Rights Comission

Grades
8 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher notes to identify the concept of identity, reflect upon students' characteristics, and then take a broader look at the class's shared attributes. This lesson includes links to download the teacher notes, slides, and student worksheets.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (68), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Use this lesson, and others found on this site to teach students about identity characteristics and assist in understanding bias. Incorporate the use of Google Slides, reviewed here, to enhance instruction by creating cohesive activities within the slides. Within your slide presentation, create slides for each group to use for the different activities. For example, the starter activity asks students to compare images of babies and adults. Use a table for students to add their thoughts under each of the categories. Add links within your slide presentation to the worksheets shared on the site and to Wordle, reviewed here, to create a class word cloud.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

'Me And White Supremacy' Helps You Do The Work Of Dismantling Racism - Eric Deggans/NPR

Grades
9 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla Saad, an East African, Black Muslim author. It includes defining terms such as "white-centering" and "ally cookies" to help readers understand white privilege. Another focus of the article is using journals to develop a conscious awareness of behaviors and thought processes.

tag(s): bias (15), black history (79), cross cultural understanding (150), identity (21), racism (58)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other materials when teaching about racism, bias, identiy, or cross-cultural understanding. The interviewee shares responses in the article by raising questions for individuals to consider and use for reflection. Ask groups of students to take different questions to discuss and respond to as part of your article's discussion. Extend learning by asking them to share their findings by creating concept maps using a tool such as mindmaps, reviewed here, or with a presentation using tool like Prezi, reviewed here. Consider using Wakelet, reviewed here, as a curation tool for collecting and sharing resources with students, and also as a presentation tool for students to share their learning with peers.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Exploring My Identity Learning Plan - Tolerance.org

Grades
K to 5
0 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Explore the essential questions of identity and groups with this learning plan developed for early elementary students. Use this plan and these essential questions to find links to...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Explore the essential questions of identity and groups with this learning plan developed for early elementary students. Use this plan and these essential questions to find links to short texts, teaching strategies, and student activities that guide students by understanding the term identity and recognizing different traits that compose identities. Registration on Tolerance.org isn't required to view this learning activity; however, free registration allows you to access the texts that include audio recordings, all of the teaching activities, and the opportunity to bookmark this plan for later use.

tag(s): bias (15), bullying (56), character education (68), diversity (37), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Although this learning plan is labeled for use with grades K-2, it includes several texts for grades 3-5, and the materials easily adapt to use with older students. Use the ideas and materials found on this site during character education lessons, when teaching about identity and diversity, or as you introduce younger students to the concept of bias. Include additional texts of your choosing to supplement learning with this lesson plan and share it with students. Consider creating an audio recording for each text, such as those found on this site. Vocaroo, reviewed here, is an audio recording site that offers tools for you to record and share messages without any time restrictions. Extend learning further by creating a class book containing student stories about identity. Use WriteReader,reviewed here, with even the youngest students. WriteReader includes options for adding video, audio recordings, images, and more. This book creation app even includes tools for sharing student writing along with correct spelling underneath.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Discovering My Identity Lesson Plan - Tolerance.org

Grades
3 to 7
0 Favorites 0  Comments
    
This standards-based lesson for upper elementary students provides directions that guide students toward understanding different identity aspects using diverse book characters. Students...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This standards-based lesson for upper elementary students provides directions that guide students toward understanding different identity aspects using diverse book characters. Students work toward answering essential questions that identify similarities and differences between themselves and others and explore how stories teach us about identity. This site provides video clips, small group discussion directions, and graphic organizers to use during the lesson.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (68), identity (21), racism (58)

In the Classroom

Include this lesson during character education lessons that teach students about racism, bias, and identity. Use edpuzzle, reviewed here, to enhance students' viewing of the video included with the lesson. Search the YouTube portion on edpuzzle to find the video, then place the discussion questions within appropriate portions of the video. edpuzzle integrates with several learning management systems, including Canvas, reviewed here, making it easy to include your annotated video as part of a larger teaching unit. As students complete their book reviews during the lesson, use FlipGrid, reviewed here, to create video book reviews. Use this FlipGrid topic throughout the year to add additional book reviews for students throughout the school year. Upload the book review graphic organizer to your topic for easy access whenever students are ready to add a new review.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Social Justice Standards: Unpacking Identity - Tolerance.org

Grades
8 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
   
Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Teaching Tolerance. This lesson teaches...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Teaching Tolerance. This lesson teaches the five identity anchor standards and how identity affects relationships in a school and classrooms. Use the charts as a reflection piece to focus on your identity and learn through school-related scenarios on how to apply and teach anti-bias standards to students.

tag(s): character education (68), cross cultural understanding (150), difficult conversations (37), empathy (24), identity (21), professional development (268), racism (58)

In the Classroom

Use this course as an introduction to understanding bias and identity from both a personal and professional level. Adapt information from this course to include in your lessons on racism, empathy, and difficult conversations. For example, use the images and charts in the application section to identify and understand that first impression and physical characteristics don't always provide a complete picture of another person's identity. Include these activities as part of a larger teaching unit using a learning management system such as Crio, reviewed here. Crio includes many options for building interactive lessons that promote critical thinking skills through various response formats, media options, and teacher feedback.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Mini Lesson: Identity Iceberg - Anti-Defamation League

Grades
8 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
This 15-minute interactive lesson for educators explores the concept of identity and the challenge of avoiding stereotypes as a way to recognize bias. Load the mini-lesson to begin...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This 15-minute interactive lesson for educators explores the concept of identity and the challenge of avoiding stereotypes as a way to recognize bias. Load the mini-lesson to begin the self-paced interactive activity. As you engage in the mini-lesson, learn about self-identity through activities that engage you in considering different parts of your identity, both seen and unseen. Application activities guide viewers further by providing specific methods for getting to know others without bias or forming opinions based upon looks.

tag(s): character education (68), empathy (24), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Use this interactive as a professional guide to understand the concept of identity and stereotypes and as inspiration on how to guide students through the topics of empathy, bias, and racism. This mini-lesson uses Padlet, reviewed here, for you to share your thoughts and reflections upon the lesson. Use Padlet as part of your lessons for students to share their thoughts and reflection as part of your ongoing discussions. Ask students to share examples of bias found in the media on a Padlet and discuss strategies for recognizing bias. Extend learning further by asking students to create infographics sharing different ways to recognize bias and use of stereotypes. Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, has a large selection of infographic templates for students to use and modify. When finished, share infographics on your class web page or as part of a digital collection shared on a webpage created with Carrd, reviewed here.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Antiracism/Diversity Bookroom - unknown

Grades
K to 6
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
This Google Slide presentation features an online bookroom with shelves full of links to YouTube video readings of books featuring Black characters. Click on any book to view the YouTube...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This Google Slide presentation features an online bookroom with shelves full of links to YouTube video readings of books featuring Black characters. Click on any book to view the YouTube recording, some created by the author and illustrator. Make sure to click on other objects in the room, including the picture frames, pillow on the chair, and the poster to view additional videos, including a master class featuring Maya Angelou. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): black history (79), book lists (133), civil rights (142), identity (21), racism (58)

In the Classroom

Include this slide with your other resources used when teaching racism or discussing self-identity. Share a link with students to use as part of a reading center to offer various read-alouds during center time. For younger students, use Symbaloo, reviewed here, as a bookmarking tool to share other videos, books, and activities as part of your unit on racism or bias. Include videos and books from this presentation as part of a learning unit created using TES Teach Blendspace, reviewed here. Add quizzes, videos, documents, and more to create digital lessons that easily adapt to any student's ability levels. Use this presentation as a model to create an interactive bookroom using books, videos, and additional materials of your choosing. Use The Brown Bookshelf, reviewed here, as an excellent starting point to find additional books featuring Black voices.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Reading Treks: American Born Chinese - TeachersFirst

Grades
7 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration and suggestions for using the trade book, American Born Chinese. American Born Chinese recounts the tale of three characters: Jin Wang, who moves to another area with his family to find that he's the only Chinese-American at his new school; the Monkey King, subject of one of the oldest Chinese tales; and Chin-Kee, who is typical of the negative Chinese stereotype and is destroying his cousin Danny's life. Their lives and stories meet up with an unforeseen turn in this current tale. Discover their journey to their identity and purpose in life while struggling with others' prejudices, especially how it applies to racism. Use our robust Instructional Guide with students in grades 7-12. Content correlates to Common Core Standards, ISTE Student Standards, National Core Arts Standards for Visual Arts, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Find the entire selection of Reading Treks here.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (150), identity (21), racism (58), virtual field trips (77)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many suggested classroom uses for this resource found on the Instructional Guide (PDF). Consider using the historical information and primary sources from the book to have students research places and events discussed in the book to create interactive timelines. Find a variety of free online timeline creation tools at located here. Using the map and locales, trace and then calculate distances for some of the locations shared. Use Google My Maps, reviewed here to create and share custom maps.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Reading Treks: Malala's Magic Pencil - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 5
0 Favorites 0  Comments
 
TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration and suggestions for using the trade book Malala's Magic Pencil. Told from Malala Yousafza's point of view, this delightful picture book describes how Malala wished for a magic pencil and what she would do with it. As a little girl, she wishes to stop time in order to get more sleep, but as she becomes an older girl, she wants to use her magic pencil to bring peace to the world. Learn how Malala realizes her identity and purpose and works to change the world without a magic pencil. Use our robust Instructional Guide with students in grades PreK-8. Content correlates to Common Core Standards, ISTE Student Standards, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Find the entire selection of Reading Treks here.

tag(s): asia (72), cross cultural understanding (150), identity (21), virtual field trips (77), women (104)

In the Classroom

Investigate many suggested classroom uses for this resource found on the Instructional Guide (PDF). With younger students, use FlipGrid, reviewed here, as a video response platform for students to share how they would use a magic pencil. Use Flipgrid with older students and ask them to generate specific ideas to address local or world issues. Extend learning by asking older students to research cultural concerns around the globe then use Story Maps, reviewed here, to tell their story through combining maps with text, video, and additional interactive content.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Humans of New York - Brandon Stanton

Grades
7 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Humans of New York was supposed to be a photography project; then it evolved into a vibrant blog featuring the individual stories and portraits of people around the world. Browse ...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Humans of New York was supposed to be a photography project; then it evolved into a vibrant blog featuring the individual stories and portraits of people around the world. Browse through the site to read stories of people from every walk of life in the United States. Choose the countries link to read featured stories from over 20 countries around the world. Don't forget to visit the "series" link to find poignant stories based on themes like pediatric cancer and refugee stories.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (150), identity (21), new york (29)

In the Classroom

Each story included on this site is only about a paragraph long, perfect to use with reluctant readers or as a short introduction to lessons on a variety of social issues. Help students identify the key concepts found in each story by creating a word cloud using Wordsift, reviewed here. Use the keywords found in your word cloud as a starting point for students to begin researching the topic further - examples might be research into refugees, drug abuse, or childhood illness. As students become familiar with the site, use it as an example to create your own site as a class related to your curriculum. For science create a Humans of Chemistry, in social studies create a Humans of the American Revolution, or in language arts create a Humans of Shakespeare. At the beginning of the year use Humans of New York in a self identity and "getting to know you" lesson(s). In small groups or as a class analyze several of the stories and have stidents use the key concepts to create their own interview questions. Then have students interview each other or others on campus (adults included). Use a presentation tool like Sway, reviewed here, to share finished projects that include student writing, photographs or drawings, videos, and other multimedia. Use Sway for a variety of assignments in any classroom that is integrating technology as an enhancement, modification, or transformation. Have students work together to compare and contrast their findings as part of a discussion within ongoing podcasts. Anchor, reviewed here, is an augmentation tool offering free podcasting creation and sharing and many features for both new and experienced podcasting teams.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database - Split This Rock

Grades
10 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
This searchable collection of over 300 poems is designed to share poetry by socially engaged poets. Poetry topics cover a wide variety of themes including aging, economics, and environmental...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This searchable collection of over 300 poems is designed to share poetry by socially engaged poets. Poetry topics cover a wide variety of themes including aging, economics, and environmental issues. Use the filters to search by format, language, and more. Many poems include audio and video versions, and international poets offer translations into English. Note: this site contains several adult themes including gender identity and sexuality. Be sure to preview any content before sharing with your students.

tag(s): authors (113), creativity (111), environment (295), identity (21), poetry (217), sexuality (16), sociology (24)

In the Classroom

Be sure to preview any work on this site before sharing with your students. Take advantage of this database for use when looking for contemporary poetry to use in your classroom. Enjoy sharing poetry with students as models for poetry writing and reading or to introduce poets to your students. Be sure to ask students what the poem says about the poet as part of a self identity unit. Once students have written their own poems, ask them what the poem says about their own self identity. Instead of asking students to create a written journal of poetry, replace the written journal and build a poetry portfolio by having them use a bookmarking tool like Wakelet, reviewed here. Use Wakelet to add links to student-created poetry, poems from their favorite poets, audio recordings of their poetry, and videos sharing different structures of poetry. As a final project, ask students to extend classroom technology by creating podcasts discussing and featuring both their work and the work of favorite poets. Anchor, reviewed here, is a free, easy to use podcast creation and sharing site.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Diversity Workshop - USC School of Social Work

Grades
9 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Diversity Workshop is a training guide for facilitating discussions on diversity and the role of identity in social relationships. Training focuses on two key areas - the concept of...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Diversity Workshop is a training guide for facilitating discussions on diversity and the role of identity in social relationships. Training focuses on two key areas - the concept of culture and identity. Different activities offer participants the opportunity to learn about and practice ideas within each concept.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (150), cultures (116), difficult conversations (37), diversity (37), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the activities shared within the guide to use as part of community building in your classroom or to teach diversity and encourage self identity. Have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as WordItOut, reviewed here. Before and after activities have students or groups collect ideas and thoughts about diversity using Dotstorming, reviewed here. The Dotstorming application creates free online bulletin boards. Embed Dotstorming on your class website for students to access at home.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Carlisle Indian Industrial School - Dickinson College

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
Discover the controversial legacy of the Indian School. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the US Government encouraged the establishment of so-called Industrial Schools...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

Discover the controversial legacy of the Indian School. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the US Government encouraged the establishment of so-called Industrial Schools designed to "civilize" Native American children and prepare them for careers outside the reservations and within white society. Today the legacy of these schools remains controversial: did they provide children with useful skills, or were they a form of ethnic cleansing that robbed them of their culture , self identity, and heritage? The Carlisle Indian Industrial School is probably best known for being the home of internationally renowned athlete Jim Thorpe, but it is also part of the family history of many Native Americans today whose ancestors attended the Pennsylvania school. Dickinson College maintains this digital archive of student records, images and special collections for use by relatives of former students and by scholars doing research on the legacy of the Indian Industrial Schools. Search by student name, by nation, or within collections of school publications and other documents. The archive is an ongoing project and will continue to grow.

tag(s): colonial america (106), cross cultural understanding (150), history day (22), identity (21), native americans (86), westward expansion (35)

In the Classroom

Too often US history survey classes broadly consider Native Americans and their role in the original colonization of North America, or their role in Westward Expansion, without taking the time to understand the differences among nations, or the impact of European settlement on these pre-existing societies. Even if there isn't time for in depth study, consider asking students to study the individual record of one young man or woman approximately their own age who attended the Carlisle Indian School. How old was he when he left home? What skill was she trained in? What happened to him after he left Carlisle? Have students use Fakebook, reviewed here, to create a "fake" page similar in style to Facebook about the individual they researched. This personal contact with the real life of another student from another time and another culture will reduce the tendency to stereotype Native Americans as they so often are during the study of US History. Of course, the site is also a wonderful resource for in depth research such as a National History Day project. Were the identities of these people stolen? Use the resources Analyzing Before and After Photographs... and the Telling Lives: The Lost Ones Documentary Film to discuss identity and whether or not that was taken from these students.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

Less
More

Nepantla: Between Worlds - Race Bridges for Schools

Grades
6 to 12
0 Favorites 0  Comments
  
This lesson plan set uses a Latino story teller whose stories to promote tolerance and embrace diversity. Short MP3 extracts are provided, which can be heard on Windows Media Player...more
Here is the direct link to share this resource review. Feel free to copy and paste this URL into an email or place it on your web page or blog so others can read this TeachersFirst review:

 Close Link

This lesson plan set uses a Latino story teller whose stories to promote tolerance and embrace diversity. Short MP3 extracts are provided, which can be heard on Windows Media Player or your computer's chosen audio program. At the time of this review, some of the MP3 tracks include "My Own Rhythms," "Why Do You Want To Go To College," "Bridge Between Worlds," and many others. With a complete lesson plans accompanying the story sections, this resource is ready to use in a variety of situations. Other lesson plan topics on ths site include : Feathers of the Wind: A Jewish-American Story, A More Perfect Union, Hidden Memory: Japanese American Internment, and several others. New lesson plans and story excerpts appear often. This site requires Windows Media Player (or similar MP3 audio player) and Adobe Acrobat. You can get them from the TeachersFirst Toolbox page.

tag(s): diversity (37), identity (21), immigration (71), mexico (32), migration (61), tolerance (9)

In the Classroom

Social studies and language arts teachers will enjoy this site when talking about diversity, second generation immigrants, identity, living between two cultural worlds, etc. Use some of the story extracts when your school is celebrating holidays around the world. Share the audio clips. And be sure to TURN UP THE VOLUME. When studying folk literature and culture, have your students search through the extracts for evidence of underlying myths and universal tales. Have your ESL students from Hispania compare their experiences to those in the stories.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

Add your comments below (available only to members) | Become a Member

Rating (click star to set rating):

Close comment form

You must be registered and logged in to add items to your favorites.
Use the form at the top of the page to log in, or click here to join TeachersFirst (it's free!).

Close

0-19 of 19