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Resources to Develop a Positive Self-Identity - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy...more
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy self-esteem about their own self-identity, without devaluing the dignity of those that may be different than they are. The resources shared in this section help teachers to enable students to recognize that people have multiple identities and are members of multiple groups within our society, creating complex and unique individuals.

tag(s): bias (15), difficult conversations (38), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to self-identity. This collection includes lesson plans, blogs, book suggestions, and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Resources Related to Difficult Conversations - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult...more
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult to discuss with students. The resources in this collection will give you ideas on how to start and facilitate tough conversations about topics like inequality, injustice, and politics sensitively while still accomplishing learning goals. You'll also find lessons and activities to encourage respectful conversation, inclusivity, empathy, and understanding.

tag(s): difficult conversations (38), empathy (24), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Explore this collection to use to engage in difficult conversations in your classroom. Learn more about difficult conversations and empathy for others in some of the informational readings.

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Understanding Empathy - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and...more
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and is an essential component of relationship building, resolving interpersonal conflicts, and understanding cause and effect. In this collection, we share resources that will help you create lessons and experiences that cultivate empathy in your students and informational websites about this important topic.

tag(s): empathy (24), perspective (13), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Help your students to develop empathy for others. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page or on your school's LMS.

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Resources on Racism and Discrimination - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism,...more
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism, and orientation discrimination can be difficult topics to broach in the classroom but are essential to discuss as students find their voices and form their understanding of the world. In this collection, we share resources about combatting racism, lesson plans about the human cost of discrimination, and additional activities to spark meaningful discussion and encourage students at all grade levels to treat all people with respect.

tag(s): black history (79), empathy (24), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to racism and discrimination. This collection includes lesson plans and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Fake News - Real News vs. Fake News - Pace University

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4 to 12
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This helpful page provides information to help users understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to...more
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This helpful page provides information to help users understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay alert and recognize fake news. It also shares suggestions on how to avoid disinformation by identifying the use of techniques such as sensational headlines. Be sure to check out the Breaking News Consumer's Handbook located at the bottom of the website that includes eleven ways to identify and recognized fake news stories and resources.

tag(s): digital citizenship (79), internet safety (121), journalism (71), media literacy (89), news (256)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources for teaching how to navigate online information. Include this website within a learning management system such as ActivelyLearn, reviewed here, to build a complete learning unit that includes articles, videos, and assessments that fully immerse and engage students in the learning activities. Enhance learning throughout the school year using Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and organize online information. For example, create a Padlet that includes a column for each of the four categories of fake news mentioned on this website, then ask students to share examples found during online use. Extend learning by asking students to become the teacher through presentations on how to recognize and avoid fake news. Provide a variety of options for student presentations including a comic creation tool like ToonyTool, reviewed here, Biteable, reviewed here, to create simple video explainers, or use Minecraft Education Edition, reviewed here, and have students create a game to teach the hazards of disinformation.

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7 Easy Activities That Encourage Students to Open Up About Identity and Privilege - Jodi Tandet

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8 to 12
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Foster discussions on diversity, identity, and privilege with the seven activities shared in this article. In addition to specific activities, the author also discusses methods for...more
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Foster discussions on diversity, identity, and privilege with the seven activities shared in this article. In addition to specific activities, the author also discusses methods for making the activities more inclusive and how to debrief to promote self-reflection among students. Each activity description includes the purpose of the activity, instructions, the key debrief question, and a bonus inclusion tip.

tag(s): character education (68), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Include activities from this article to get to know your students or as part of character education lessons that focus on diversity, identity, and privilege. Be sure to take advantage of the tips that offer suggestions for including all students, especially those with disabilities such as vision, hearing, or mobile impairments. Some activities, such as the fourth one, include vocabulary that may or may not be familiar to students. Enhance learning by creating word clouds using WordClouds, reviewed here, that encourage students to brainstorm concepts associated with these terms.

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5 Powerful lesson ideas to help students find self-identity - Lucie Renard

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5 to 12
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Encourage students to reflect upon and understand their self-identity with five lessons adapted from Katja Schipperheijn's book, Digital Citizen. Lesson activities encourage students...more
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Encourage students to reflect upon and understand their self-identity with five lessons adapted from Katja Schipperheijn's book, Digital Citizen. Lesson activities encourage students to share opinions, consider their interests and expertise, and introduce themselves to others using only 250 characters.

tag(s): character education (68), identity (21), professional development (267)

In the Classroom

Use ideas found in this article to encourage students to reflect upon their self-identity and reflect upon how they want to be viewed by others. The fifth lesson suggests using Bitmoji, reviewed here, to build avatars to reflect self-image. Incorporate this activity with the 250 character response to extend learning and tie together students' physical identity ideas with their concept of what makes them unique. Use Canva Edu, reviewed here, and have students upload their Bitmoji and response to create a flyer that introduces them to others.

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Ten Teacher Recommendations in Facilitating Conversations About Race in the Classroom - H. Richard Milner IV

Grades
5 to 12
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Discussions of race and society in the classroom are difficult for many teachers. This article provides ten specific ideas that encourage, cultivate, and support race with students....more
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Discussions of race and society in the classroom are difficult for many teachers. This article provides ten specific ideas that encourage, cultivate, and support race with students. Although created with middle school and high school students in mind, this article is also adaptable to the elementary level.

tag(s): bias (15), civil rights (143), difficult conversations (38), professional development (267), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article as part of your professional development activities within your grade level or building as a support for understanding best practices on how to address racial issues, bias, or any difficult conversations that arise in a classroom. One way to really focus on this topic is to discuss one of the ten specific ideas each month. As a staff, share situations where the idea worked well or discuss ways to continue building a supportive environment built upon the topic focus. If you use Microsoft products, create a collaborative document using OneNote, reviewed here, to share ideas and participate in online conversations. Google users may want to consider using Google Keep, reviewed here, as a collaborative tool.

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LGBTQ History and Why It Matters - FacingHistory.org

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10 to 12
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Examine history through the lens of LGBTQ people and events with this lesson provided by FacingHistory.org. Challenging students to consider their current knowledge of history, students...more
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Examine history through the lens of LGBTQ people and events with this lesson provided by FacingHistory.org. Challenging students to consider their current knowledge of history, students participate in reflective and analytic activities that provide insight into experiences not included in typical historical narratives. This lesson includes printable exercises for students, along with suggestions for teaching strategies and extension activities.

tag(s): bias (15), civil rights (143), difficult conversations (38), sexuality (16)

In the Classroom

This lesson plan includes many excellent activities and resources that work well as a stand-alone lesson or to incorporate into your current history units as a supplement to provide a new perspective that highlights bias, gender, and civil rights issues. Discussing LBGTQ issues may lead to difficult conversations in the classroom; use this lesson to provide factual information within current history lessons. This site includes a variety of ideas and descriptions of teaching strategies that work well with any lesson. Be sure to bookmark this page to use as a reference for strategies to incorporate within many of your current units. One strategy mentioned is the use of exit cards as a reflective response or class discussion. Learn more about incorporating exit tickets as an authentic learning activity by viewing the archive of the July 2018 OK2Ask webinar, Measuring Authentic Learning Activities with Exit Slips, reviewed here. Consider sharing this lesson with your school's guidance counselor to use when counseling students who are dealing with identity or gender issues.
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Lesson Plan: Exploring Identity - Cari Ladd

Grades
9 to 12
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What makes up an individual's identity? This lesson plan includes video clips to introduce identity and then culminates with students creating a self-portrait using items or elements...more
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What makes up an individual's identity? This lesson plan includes video clips to introduce identity and then culminates with students creating a self-portrait using items or elements that share key aspects of their self-identity. Note: this is an archived version of the lesson plan found on PBS POV (Points of View), and the video links are not available on PBS. However, they are available by searching on YouTube and using each video's title to find and use the video in your lesson.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (68), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Incorporate this lesson into your current study units related to learning about identity, differences between people, bias, and character education. Use this lesson with younger students by finding videos with students that are the approximate age of those in your class. The lesson includes a study guide to accompany the videos, use edpuzzle, reviewed here, as an alternative to a paper worksheet by adding questions and comments to appropriate areas within each video. As students complete their self-portraits, add them to a class book created using Book Creator, reviewed here. In addition to a picture of each self-portrait, ask students to create a short video sharing and discussing the characteristics they identify as important to their identity. Share your book with students in lower grade levels to help them learn how to celebrate differences in others.
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Identity and Characteristics Lesson - Equality and Human Rights Comission

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8 to 12
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Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher...more
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Explore the different sides of identity to understand the complexities and ever-changing facets of identity through this lesson's secondary students' activities. Follow the teacher notes to identify the concept of identity, reflect upon students' characteristics, and then take a broader look at the class's shared attributes. This lesson includes links to download the teacher notes, slides, and student worksheets.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (68), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Use this lesson, and others found on this site to teach students about identity characteristics and assist in understanding bias. Incorporate the use of Google Slides, reviewed here, to enhance instruction by creating cohesive activities within the slides. Within your slide presentation, create slides for each group to use for the different activities. For example, the starter activity asks students to compare images of babies and adults. Use a table for students to add their thoughts under each of the categories. Add links within your slide presentation to the worksheets shared on the site and to Wordle, reviewed here, to create a class word cloud.
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White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack - Peggy McIntosh

Grades
10 to 12
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This article from the National Seed Project discusses the concept of white privilege and identifies some of the daily effects of this privilege. Most notable in the article is the ...more
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This article from the National Seed Project discusses the concept of white privilege and identifies some of the daily effects of this privilege. Most notable in the article is the list of conditions the author defines as attached to skin color privilege compared to those based on class, religion, ethnic status, or geographic location. In addition to the article, a series of notes for facilitators is included for presenters using My White Privilege Papers series.

tag(s): bias (15), character education (68), civil rights (143), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with others as part of your ongoing professional development about racism and bias. It is also practical to use with older students as part of lessons on racism. Make it easier for students to break down the information in the article through the collaborative use of Fiskkit, reviewed here. Upload the article to Fiskkit and share the link with students. Ask them to highlight areas of interest and add comments. Follow the author's advice and encourage students to draw on personal experiences as part of their discussions. One method for sharing experiences is through the use of short audio discussions using Synth, reviewed here. Think of Synth as an audio version of Twitter; users record up to 256 seconds of audio that work together to build powerful podcasts.

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'Interrupt The Systems': Robin DiAngelo On 'White Fragility' And Anti-Racism - Ari Shapiro/NPR

Grades
9 to 12
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NPR's Like Kit series shares this article and audio from a recent podcast featuring a discussion with author Robin DiAngelo. DiAngelo shares suggestions for white people with specific...more
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NPR's Like Kit series shares this article and audio from a recent podcast featuring a discussion with author Robin DiAngelo. DiAngelo shares suggestions for white people with specific ideas on how to reflect upon their racism. Other recommendations include tips on how to educate yourself by engaging in resources created by people of color. This article contains many links to supplemental information, including books and a 21-Day Habit Building Challenge.

tag(s): authors (115), bias (15), character education (68), civil rights (143), difficult conversations (38), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources to discuss racism, bias, or when addressing difficult conversations in the classroom. Use a curation tool like Padlet, reviewed here, to share and discuss articles, videos, and online information. As students research and learn more from other authors, help them organize information using SuperNoteCard, reviewed here. SuperNoteCard is a virtual notecard taking tool similar to the familiar 3X5 index cards used for notetaking by hand. Use notecards to keep a list of authors and articles, jot down big ideas, and compare suggestions for making positive changes.

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'Me And White Supremacy' Helps You Do The Work Of Dismantling Racism - Eric Deggans/NPR

Grades
9 to 12
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This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla ...more
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This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla Saad, an East African, Black Muslim author. It includes defining terms such as "white-centering" and "ally cookies" to help readers understand white privilege. Another focus of the article is using journals to develop a conscious awareness of behaviors and thought processes.

tag(s): bias (15), black history (79), cross cultural understanding (150), identity (21), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other materials when teaching about racism, bias, identiy, or cross-cultural understanding. The interviewee shares responses in the article by raising questions for individuals to consider and use for reflection. Ask groups of students to take different questions to discuss and respond to as part of your article's discussion. Extend learning by asking them to share their findings by creating concept maps using a tool such as mindmaps, reviewed here, or with a presentation using tool like Prezi, reviewed here. Consider using Wakelet, reviewed here, as a curation tool for collecting and sharing resources with students, and also as a presentation tool for students to share their learning with peers.

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'Not Racist' Is Not Enough: Putting In The Work To Be Anti-Racist - Eric Deggans/NPR

Grades
8 to 12
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This article from National Public Radio (NPR) is part of their Life Kit series that provides advice from experts on everyday problems. The discussion focuses on the topic of racism...more
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This article from National Public Radio (NPR) is part of their Life Kit series that provides advice from experts on everyday problems. The discussion focuses on the topic of racism and suggestions on how to be anti-racist. The author shares four tips to use as guidelines on personal behaviors at home, work, and everyday life.

tag(s): bias (15), black history (79), cross cultural understanding (150), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other materials when discussing racism and bias. Engage students in a collaborative discussion of this article and others using Fiskkit, reviewed here. Add a link to the article in Fiskitt, then share with students to add questions and comments as they discuss the article together online. To help students focus on the topic, consider providing a list of possible questions before reading the article. Extend learning by asking students to use graphic organizers such as a 4-Circle Venn Diagram Creator, reviewed here, to compare and contrast information. For example, ask students to explore different media forms such as television, social media, podcasts, and literature and compare different presentations of racism and bias.

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Social Justice Standards: Unpacking Identity - Tolerance.org

Grades
8 to 12
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Teaching Tolerance. This lesson teaches...more
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Teaching Tolerance. This lesson teaches the five identity anchor standards and how identity affects relationships in a school and classrooms. Use the charts as a reflection piece to focus on your identity and learn through school-related scenarios on how to apply and teach anti-bias standards to students.

tag(s): character education (68), cross cultural understanding (150), difficult conversations (38), empathy (24), identity (21), professional development (267), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Use this course as an introduction to understanding bias and identity from both a personal and professional level. Adapt information from this course to include in your lessons on racism, empathy, and difficult conversations. For example, use the images and charts in the application section to identify and understand that first impression and physical characteristics don't always provide a complete picture of another person's identity. Include these activities as part of a larger teaching unit using a learning management system such as Crio, reviewed here. Crio includes many options for building interactive lessons that promote critical thinking skills through various response formats, media options, and teacher feedback.

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Mini Lesson: Identity Iceberg - Anti-Defamation League

Grades
8 to 12
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This 15-minute interactive lesson for educators explores the concept of identity and the challenge of avoiding stereotypes as a way to recognize bias. Load the mini-lesson to begin...more
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This 15-minute interactive lesson for educators explores the concept of identity and the challenge of avoiding stereotypes as a way to recognize bias. Load the mini-lesson to begin the self-paced interactive activity. As you engage in the mini-lesson, learn about self-identity through activities that engage you in considering different parts of your identity, both seen and unseen. Application activities guide viewers further by providing specific methods for getting to know others without bias or forming opinions based upon looks.

tag(s): character education (68), empathy (24), identity (21)

In the Classroom

Use this interactive as a professional guide to understand the concept of identity and stereotypes and as inspiration on how to guide students through the topics of empathy, bias, and racism. This mini-lesson uses Padlet, reviewed here, for you to share your thoughts and reflections upon the lesson. Use Padlet as part of your lessons for students to share their thoughts and reflection as part of your ongoing discussions. Ask students to share examples of bias found in the media on a Padlet and discuss strategies for recognizing bias. Extend learning further by asking students to create infographics sharing different ways to recognize bias and use of stereotypes. Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, has a large selection of infographic templates for students to use and modify. When finished, share infographics on your class web page or as part of a digital collection shared on a webpage created with Carrd, reviewed here.

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Whiteness Project: Millenials in Dallas, Texas - Whitney Dow

Grades
9 to 12
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The Whiteness Project features a series of interviews with millennials from Dallas, Texas. The short video interviews share their understanding of their whiteness. At the end of each...more
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The Whiteness Project features a series of interviews with millennials from Dallas, Texas. The short video interviews share their understanding of their whiteness. At the end of each interview, a statistic providing context is shared to encourage the viewing audience's self-reflection. View all of the statistics used on the site by selecting the data link at the top of the page.

tag(s): character education (68), civil rights (143), cross cultural understanding (150), cultures (116), difficult conversations (38), empathy (24), racism (59)

In the Classroom

The Whiteness Project provides a unique and interesting resource for introducing and discussing difficult topics in the classroom, including racism, prejudice, bias, and empathy. Share this site with students and provide them time to listen to some of the conversations and the provided statistics. Encourage students to choose one statistic as a starting point for additional research. For example, one piece of data shared is the number of adults who have two or more races in their background. This provides a starting point for researching race in your community, state, or in the country. As students complete research, ask them to share their findings in a multimedia presentation using a tool like Sway, reviewed here, to add graphs, charts, images, and video that support their findings.

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Code Switch - National Public Radio (NPR)

Grades
9 to 12
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Code Switch is an NPR podcast featuring conversations about race that air several times each month. The podcast includes a wide variety of topics ranging from politics to sports and...more
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Code Switch is an NPR podcast featuring conversations about race that air several times each month. The podcast includes a wide variety of topics ranging from politics to sports and much more. The podcast hosts include award-winning journalists from a variety of races to share their perspectives on current issues. Podcasts range in length from approximately 20 minutes to just under one hour. Each podcast link includes a transcript, download link, and embed code.

tag(s): black history (79), character education (68), difficult conversations (38), native americans (86), racism (59)

In the Classroom

Include this podcast as a resource for lessons on racism, bias, or when facing difficult conversations in the classroom. Be sure to sign up to listen to the newest podcasts on your favorite resource and scroll through the archives to find relevant recordings beginning in 2016. As students listen to podcasts, use Google Slides, reviewed here, to create a reflective document for students to share important information from the podcast along with any questions or information for further research. Use the podcasts as a model for students to create their own podcasts on any topic. Search ReadWriteThink, reviewed here, to find many tools to help students develop interesting podcasts including rubrics, podcast tutorials, and a lesson plan for teaching with podcasts. When students are ready to record and share their podcasts, Buzzsprout, reviewed here, is a free podcasting tool that provides options for scheduling broadcasts, adding chapters, and much more.

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Spent - Urban Ministries of Durham

Grades
8 to 12
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Spent is an online game that teaches the challenges of poverty and the difficult choices facing low-income earners. Throughout the game, players make choices related to income options...more
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Spent is an online game that teaches the challenges of poverty and the difficult choices facing low-income earners. Throughout the game, players make choices related to income options and spending needs. Choices include decisions that affect the health, education, and living conditions of the player's family. The game ends when you run out of money or reach the end of the month.

tag(s): character education (68), difficult conversations (38), empathy (24), financial literacy (108)

In the Classroom

Include Spent as a learning resource to include with your lessons on empathy or difficult conversations. Ask students to spend time playing Spent as a way to explore how choices they make affect their living situation. Ask students to take a screen recording of a difficult choice they make while playing Spent and discuss their thinking behind the option chosen. Use Screencast-o-matic, reviewed here, to record and share student's recordings. If you teach older high school students, use Spent to introduce a research unit into understanding poverty in your community. Have students share their learning using multimedia presentation tools like Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here, or Visme, reviewed here.

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