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Kialo - Kialo, Inc

Grades
8 to 12
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Kialo offers a platform for focused online discussions. Use Kialo to create and map out debates onto an interactive tree featuring arguments both pro and con. Create your own forum...more
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Kialo offers a platform for focused online discussions. Use Kialo to create and map out debates onto an interactive tree featuring arguments both pro and con. Create your own forum or participate in the questions posed by other site members. Choose to make your question private or public then invite others to contribute. Throughout the debate use the site's tools to rate the impact of arguments and switch perspectives to view opinions from the other side. Be sure to watch Kialo's introductory video for an overview of all of the site's features.

tag(s): collaboration (48), debate (47), perspective (12), point of view (11), Teacher Utilities (54)

In the Classroom

Kialo is a great resource to find debate topics to use with your students; be sure to bookmark it. Explore the topics available on the public portion of the site and share the discussions with your students. Use the information to teach students how to include relevant information when debating any topic and point out the importance of viewing information through different perspectives. When ready, create your own topic for classroom debate using the private option. For example, have students debate the importance of the use of propaganda during World War 2 or the ethics of using animals when testing products. As students research your topic, have them use Wakelet, reviewed here, to bookmark and save their research. When complete, transform learning by asking students to use an infographic creation tool like Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, to create an infographic based on their topic.

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Bad News - Cambridge Social Decision-Making Lab and DROG

Grades
5 to 12
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How bad can you be? This game teaches you how fake news and disinformation spreads as players take on the role of the bad guy to acquire as many followers ...more
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How bad can you be? This game teaches you how fake news and disinformation spreads as players take on the role of the bad guy to acquire as many followers as possible while raising their credibility ratings. Follow the prompts and make selections on how to spread disinformation and take advantage of others' fears and emotions as you proceed through the game. As you make choices, watch how that affects the number of your followers and learn how to use celebrity and fear to influence others. Throughout the game, players earn up to six badges recognizing accomplishments such as impersonation and emotion.

tag(s): digital citizenship (73), game based learning (146), internet safety (122), media literacy (72), social media (37)

In the Classroom

This game is perfect for use as an introduction to lessons on digital citizenship, media literacy, and social media. Share the site with your students to explore on their own and encourage them to play several different times using the different options provided. Your students won't mind playing over and over; it is easy to get hooked on trying to find the best way to gain as many followers as possible! Once students become familiar with the game and the different options presented for spreading misinformation, ask them to apply their findings to online content. Have them do some online research to find sites or information using tactics such as emotion and the others featured in Bad News. As they research sites and online information, have them add links to the sites they find on a class Padlet. Padlet, reviewed here, offers an option to create columns, use this option then label a column for each badge found in the game and ask students to share a link to their sites in the appropriate column. In addition to adding a link, have students include a comment providing information on why their site belongs in the category. Instead of assessing learning with quizzes or a written report, transform your assessment by having students create infographics to share information learned. Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, provides easy to use templates to create interesting and informative infographics. Take learning one step further and ask students to become the teacher using Symbaloo Learning Paths, reviewed here, to create an online learning activity teaching others on how to recognize and avoid disinformation found online. Be sure to share your assessment rubric with students as part of your assignment. Find many ideas for implementing rubrics for assessment along with examples and online tools at TeachersFirst Rubrics to the Rescue, reviewed here.

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Civic Online Reasoning - Stanford University

Grades
6 to 12
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This series of assessments offers students a selection of online content and asks them to evaluate and judge the credibility of information. Using digital resources like Wikipedia,...more
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This series of assessments offers students a selection of online content and asks them to evaluate and judge the credibility of information. Using digital resources like Wikipedia, Twitter, and news websites students view information then respond to the provided questions. Competencies evaluated through the activities include student ability to understand who is giving information, identifying evidence, and comparing the content studied to that shared by other sources.

tag(s): journalism (63), news (259), social media (37)

In the Classroom

Include activities from this site as part of any online safety lesson. Use these lessons at the beginning of the school year to teach students how to evaluate online information and as an assessment for the understanding of the ability to judge the credibility of information and sources. Student responses from this site are created through Google Forms, use these responses as a template to create your own Google Forms for personalized content such as local news articles or tv news. Instead of creating a table to compare and contrast various sources of information, replace paper and pencil by using an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, for students to evaluate similarities and differences between news sources. Have students share their learning by creating an infographic using Canva Infographic Creator, reviewed here. Challenge students to include facts, comparisons, and images to create the infographics.

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Online Teen Safety - StaySafe.org

Grades
5 to 12
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This guide shares online safety suggestions for teens and parents by providing basic facts and advice. Starting with tips for protecting hardware and devices from viruses and malware...more
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This guide shares online safety suggestions for teens and parents by providing basic facts and advice. Starting with tips for protecting hardware and devices from viruses and malware the site guides readers through a variety of valuable information. Additional topics include social media, scams and online shopping, and online bullying. Although the site lacks a lot of bells and whistles, it offers a great deal of information related to online safety and provides a starting point for further research.

tag(s): cyberbullying (47), internet safety (122)

In the Classroom

Include the information from this site with your other resources for teaching about online safety. Instead of creating a list of links for students, share safety tips with students by replacing the list using a bookmarking tool like Padlet, reviewed here, to share all resources including videos, websites, and more in one place. Invite students to add their own resources to the Padlet as a collaborative activity on internet safety. Create quizzes using Baamboozle, reviewed here, as a formative assessment during your online safety unit. Baamboozle is a quick and easy quiz creation tool to replace paper and pencil. Divide the class into groups to research the different topics found on this site then let them create their own Baamboozle quizzes for their classmates. Instead of teaching online safety in individual lessons, consider using Symbaloo Learning Paths, reviewed here, to create a learning path including all of your lessons. Have students follow at their own pace and use tools with the Learning Paths to offer differentiation for the abilities and interests of your students. To modify learning and further challenge students, have them create their own internet safety Learning Paths for classmates to complete.

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The United States Diplomacy Center - United States Department of State

Grades
8 to 12
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The United States Diplomacy Center shares free simulations providing hands-on exercises in dealing with complex world problems. Topics include migration, nuclear arms, global health...more
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The United States Diplomacy Center shares free simulations providing hands-on exercises in dealing with complex world problems. Topics include migration, nuclear arms, global health issues, and more. Free materials include student learning packets available in three different ability levels and videos featuring content experts. Educator materials include all information to conduct each scenario including student materials and tools for productive negotiations.

tag(s): animals (319), cross cultural understanding (130), debate (47), migration (59), nuclear energy (27), oceans (163), pollution (66), water (136)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of these free materials to immerse students in learning about current events topics through a global lens. One important component of these lessons includes the task of completing a series of formal and informal discussions on each topic. As students identify key topics and information, enhance their learning by asking them to use Lino, reviewed here, to create digital sticky notes to share among teachers and peers. Use options within Lino to color code the sticky notes to identify the group creating the note or different concepts to address throughout the simulation. Simulations also provide background information on each topic, use this information as a starting point, then have students research each topic further on their own or in groups. Share bookmarks and resources using SearchTeam, reviewed here. In addition to sharing bookmarks, SearchTeam includes tools for adding notes and comments for all team members to use when collaborating together. Throughout your simulation activities, use FlipGrid, reviewed here, to modify learning and to pose essential questions discussed within the activity. Have students add video responses within Flipgrid to share their perspective and solutions to the different problems. As a final learning activity, provide students options for sharing their conclusions and suggestions to the simulation activities through a variety of multimedia choices. Instead of a book report or PowerPoint presentation consider asking students to create a digital book using Book Creator, reviewed here, or a multimedia presentation using Adobe Spark for Education, reviewed here. Both options offer tools for transforming students' learning to include video, images, and more to share their final conclusion and perspective on the topic included in the simulation.
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Checkology - News Literacy Project and the Facebook Journalism Project

Grades
8 to 12
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Help your students (and you) learn how to separate fact from fiction in media through lessons and tools provided by Checkology. Free accounts offer users access to three Checkology...more
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Help your students (and you) learn how to separate fact from fiction in media through lessons and tools provided by Checkology. Free accounts offer users access to three Checkology news literacy lessons. Lessons include tools for students to learn how to categorize information, evaluate bias, and evaluate arguments. Checkology incorporates videos and activities shared by real-world journalists. As they complete activities, they use online tools built into the system including bias checkers and infozones to evaluate the type of resource used for analysis.

tag(s): journalism (63), media literacy (72), social media (37)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free materials found on Checkology to use as a starting point for teaching students how to evaluate news and news sources. Use an online quiz tool like Dotstorming, reviewed here, as an activator to begin your news unit. Include several different news articles on your Dotstorming board and ask students to decide if they are true or made up stories. Dotstorming also allows students to comment, ask them to share their reasoning behind their choices. As students become more proficient in identifying misinformation in news sources, ask them to modify their learning and create infographics sharing their tips for other students. Canva Infographic Creator, reviewed here, provides many templates for creating and sharing infographics. Have students write their own articles sharing misinformation, replace pen and paper journals and have students share them in a blog using Edublog, reviewed here, then ask their peers to review the blog and identify the misinformation included in the article. Consider having students share a weekly screencast with their peers using Free Screen Recorder Online, reviewed here. Use these screencasts to share websites that spread disinformation or highlight well-written news articles containing factual information to use as models.

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Read. Inquire. Write. - University of Michigan

Grades
6 to 10
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Read. Inquire. Write. is a free curriculum using investigations to support middle school social studies learning through inquiry-based lessons; also, this site provides many supports...more
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Read. Inquire. Write. is a free curriculum using investigations to support middle school social studies learning through inquiry-based lessons; also, this site provides many supports for English Language Learners within the activities. Use the provided literacy tools to guide students in analytical reasoning and argument writing within the 5-day investigations. Each investigation includes all materials needed including teacher's guides, student packets, rubrics, student models, and a PowerPoint presentation. Also, all activities provide video models demonstrating methods to encourage student thinking and investigative responses. Each lesson includes correlation to Common Core Standards. Registration is required to download materials from this site. Videos reside on YouTube. If your school blocks YouTube, they may not be viewable.

tag(s): civil war (145), colonial america (108), concept mapping (18), debate (47), democracy (16), evaluating sources (15), greece (29), inquiry (29), maps (295), mexico (31), middle east (43), native americans (80)

In the Classroom

Instead of using paper documents, scan the included PDF or Word documents into Google Classroom or your school student/teacher platform to share and assign to students. Be sure to include mentor texts for student use. Enhance student learning by asking students to use highlighting and note-taking tools within their word document to provide documentation for their responses. Although this site includes many high-quality graphic organizers, create your own and using Diagramo, reviewed here, to personalize for your classroom use. Have students use a digital portfolio tool to share their investigations. PorfolioVillage, reviewed here, includes many resources for creating online portfolios and web pages. Consider sharing the activities found on this site with your peers as a model for redesigning lessons you already use in your classroom. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to collaborate and share ideas, activities, and resources as you work toward incorporating inquiry lessons into your classrooms.
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Engaging Congress - Indiana University

Grades
5 to 12
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Engaging Congress is an interactive game that uses primary sources to help students evaluate information as they learn about the United States government. Download the app from Google...more
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Engaging Congress is an interactive game that uses primary sources to help students evaluate information as they learn about the United States government. Download the app from Google Play or the iTunes store, or select the webGL link to play on the web. Begin play by choosing a story, primary source, or pick a trivia challenge or practice. Use the Teacher Toolbox to find documents by era or topic, learning objectives matched to Common Core Standards, and compelling questions for use with each issue and story. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of the home page to find the link to request classroom giveaways to encourage play!

tag(s): branches of government (57), congress (40), DAT device agnostic tool (173), primary sources (98)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the free games and materials on this site to use as a supplement to your current resources for teaching history and government. Instead of written notes, strengthen learning by having students use an online tool such as Creately, reviewed here, to create diagrams, mindmaps, and other visual graphic organizers. To compare and contrast information found in different primary sources, create a Venn Diagram using Creately. As students prepare to share their findings and summarize their learning, have them modify their learning by creating infographics using Canva Infographic Creator, reviewed here, to visually represent facts and information. As a final assessment for your unit using these materials, ask students to form teams to debate different sides of the issues presented. Share their debates as a podcast using Anchor, reviewed here. Anchor is a simple to use podcasting tool offering several free options for creating, hosting, and sharing podcasts. As an alternative, ask other students redefine their learning and to create multimedia presentations using Sway, reviewed here to share text, videos, images, and more.
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Eagle Eye Citizen - Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

Grades
5 to 12
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Develop civic understanding and historical thinking skills through interactive challenges found on Eagle Eye Citizen. These activities, geared toward middle and high school students,...more
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Develop civic understanding and historical thinking skills through interactive challenges found on Eagle Eye Citizen. These activities, geared toward middle and high school students, teach about American History using primary sources from the Library of Congress. The Solve link provides challenge puzzles to learn about historical events, the big picture, and sorting information into categories. Use the Teach link to find ideas for lessons and units based on this site's components, assessment ideas, and quick activities for use at any time. This link also includes several rubrics for use with the Challenge activities.

tag(s): branches of government (57), civil rights (124), congress (40), elections (76), immigrants (23), presidents (131), womens suffrage (26)

In the Classroom

Share activities from this site to introduce civics and government lessons; be sure to point out links with additional resources included after problem-solving activities. Share a link to this site on your class website for students to use at home. Replace written notes and help students organize information using a mind mapping tool like Coggle, reviewed here. Use Coggle to create and share colorful diagrams with included text and images. As students continue through the unit, have them enhance their learning by including their diagram on a website sharing their knowledge of civics concepts or discussing the historical event studied. Webnode, reviewed here, is a free website creator offering premade templates and easy to use tools. Transform student learning at the next level and ask them to create a book for younger students to teach them about the event studied using Book Creator,reviewed here. For example, when learning about the three branches of government ask students to create a digital book explaining the functions of the three branches. Book Creator allows you to include videos, images, audio recordings, and more.
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Fake It To Make It Game - Amanda Warner

Grades
7 to 12
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Learn about how and why fake news is created and distributed with this game where players earn money by spreading false news. Begin by selecting a guide for the game ...more
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Learn about how and why fake news is created and distributed with this game where players earn money by spreading false news. Begin by selecting a guide for the game and choosing a financial goal. Follow the game to create your site and choose from different payment and options for monetizing information, while at the same time working toward optimum credibility. As the game continues, players select options for sharing their fake news to gain the maximum number of shares and likes. Throughout the game, follow your progress to your financial goal chosen at the beginning of the activity.

tag(s): journalism (63), news (259), newspapers (101), problem solving (294)

In the Classroom

More than ever, understanding the use of media to manipulate readers is a critical skill. Use this game as a supplement to lessons on verifying news sources and fact-checking. Help students discover trigger words found in fake news articles by creating lists of sensational words. Replace word lists with a word cloud creator like Wordsift, reviewed here, to help visualize the use of trigger words found in online news. Have students find fake news online to analyze for misrepresentations of facts. Instead of doing this as a pencil and paper project, ask students to transform their learning and use ThingLink, reviewed here, to share an image of the article and add links, images, and videos to "debunk" false information. As students become more familiar with recognizing fake news, have them use a comic creation tool like ToonyTool, reviewed here, to modify their learning by creating single frame cartoons with tips for avoiding false information then share these comics on your class or school webpage.

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#ThisIs18 Around the World - New York Times

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9 to 12
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#ThisIs18 is an interactive photo essay from the New York Times that shares images of everyday life for 18-year-old girls around the world. Pictures and interviews conducted by young...more
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#ThisIs18 is an interactive photo essay from the New York Times that shares images of everyday life for 18-year-old girls around the world. Pictures and interviews conducted by young women accompanied by professional mentors produce the content shared in this interactive. A look at girls' lives across 15 languages including 21 subjects providing an insightful snapshot into their everyday life across the globe.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (130), cultures (113), women (101)

In the Classroom

Be sure to allow some time for students to explore all of the information shared in this incredible interactive. After students have looked through this site on their own, take a deeper look together by displaying the site on your interactive whiteboard and discussing together as a class. Have student share the portions that had the deepest impact on them, compare and contrast their everyday life to those in the interactive, and define topics for further exploration. Use this site as a starting point for a biography project or unit on cultures within your school or community. One great resource for starting a biography and enhancing student learning is the Cube Creator, reviewed here. Instead of just using written notes, extend students' learning by challenging them to take audio recordings of interviews using Vocaroo, reviewed here. Use #ThisIs18 as a model to create your own interactive sharing student interviews and biographies. Sway, reviewed here is an excellent multimedia tool to redefine learning and for publishing and sharing content. Include audio and video interviews, student writing, and more to create your storytelling project.

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OK2Ask: Engage & Inspire: BreakoutEDU Digital - TeachersFirst

Grades
2 to 12
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session from April 2019, opens in Adobe Connect. Breakout EDU Digital is the online version of the immersive learning games...more
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This recording of an OK2Ask online professional learning session from April 2019, opens in Adobe Connect. Breakout EDU Digital is the online version of the immersive learning games platform. It's exciting! It's fun! And, it's an effective learner-centered teaching strategy you will reach for again and again. Learn how to implement this instructional strategy in your classroom. Understand the many benefits of this approach such as developing problem-solving skills, fostering a growth mindset, encouraging collaboration and teamwork, and promoting access to content knowledge. Participants will: 1. Understand Breakout EDU Digital as a learner-centered instructional strategy; 2. Explore a collection of Breakout EDU Digital examples to understand how to use the strategy in the classroom; and 3. Plan for the use of Breakout EDU Digital in the classroom. This session is appropriate for teachers at all technology levels.

tag(s): collaboration (48), critical thinking (116)

In the Classroom

The archive of this teacher-friendly, hands-on webinar will empower and inspire you to use learning technology in the classroom and for professional productivity. As appropriate, specific classroom examples and ideas have been shared. View the session with a few of your teaching colleagues to find and share new ideas. Find additional information and links to tools at the session resource page. Learn more about OK2Ask and upcoming sessions here.
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Project Look Sharp - Project Look Sharp, Ithaca College

Grades
K to 12
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Project Look Sharp promotes media literacy education and critical thinking skills through the offering of curriculum kits for classrooms in grades K-12. The free kits include teacher...more
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Project Look Sharp promotes media literacy education and critical thinking skills through the offering of curriculum kits for classrooms in grades K-12. The free kits include teacher guides, handouts, assessments, and correlating digital media. Browse through all available kits, or filter by grade level or Common Core Standard. Each kit is available for download in its entirety or download individual lessons as desired; registration is required. Lesson contents cover a variety of topics including Global Warming, Presidential Campaigns, and Social Justice. Be sure to look through other sections of the site including professional development information and links to handouts from Project Look Sharp's presentations.

tag(s): american revolution (88), climate change (73), environment (322), martin luther king (37), media literacy (72), middle east (43), nutrition (156), presidents (131), russia (35), social media (37)

In the Classroom

Become acquainted with these free curriculum kits and lessons to integrate media literacy within content already taught in the classroom. As you teach lessons found on the site, incorporate technology to enhance learning and build student understanding. Use Word Writer, reviewed here, to introduce and develop vocabulary during individual activities. This tool allows you to enhance classroom technology use and create assignments using individual vocabulary lists then provide feedback and options for student revisions and peer feedback. Incorporate images with annotations to help students understand "big picture" ideas using ThingLink, reviewed here. For younger students create a ThingLink together as a class to add text, video, and more to images. Ask older students to create their own ThingLink sharing information learned throughout your lessons. Be sure to share all of your images on your class website for students to view at any time. To transform classroom technology use and as a culminating activity, use a digital book creation tool like Book Creator, reviewed here, as an alternative assessment to quizzes or tests. Include student-created writing, ThingLink images, and add videos with student commentary within each book. Be sure to provide students with your rubric to use as a guide before turning in digital books. Find many ideas for implementing rubrics for assessment along with examples and online tools at TeachersFirst Rubrics to the Rescue, reviewed here. Whether students work individually or in groups, be sure to share your new digital library related to your lesson topic with students to review and revisit at any time!
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Fiskkit - John Pettus

Grades
6 to 12
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Think of Fiskkit as a social media tool for sharing, discussing, and evaluating online articles similar to marking up a paper with a red pen. Copy and paste the URL ...more
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Think of Fiskkit as a social media tool for sharing, discussing, and evaluating online articles similar to marking up a paper with a red pen. Copy and paste the URL for a news story into Fiskkit to input into the site. Once available, click on any sentence to rate or tag information as true/false, descriptive, or complimentary. Share the article with others to evaluate then view the graph showing tag distribution. After sharing the article with your class use your account to see student names that read the article, organize comments, and open individual sentences for classroom discussion.

tag(s): critical thinking (116), journalism (63), media literacy (72), news (259), newspapers (101)

In the Classroom

Use Fiskkit in your classroom to teach students critical thinking and analysis skills. Share current news articles weekly with students to evaluate and discuss. After students provide their input, share the results on your interactive whiteboard, or with a projector, to review and discuss the reactions as a group. As students evaluate articles, replace paper note cards and suggest they use an online note-taking tool similar to Webnote, reviewed here, to justify their answers on Fiskkit. Webnote allows you to add sticky notes on the computer workspace and share with others using the URL created. Challenge students to find articles they would like to discuss, save, and collaborate on using SearchTeam, reviewed here. SearchTeam offers you tools to bookmark and save websites, with the additional feature of allowing participants to add comments to saved information. SearchTeam can be used for a variety of assignments in any classroom that is integrating technology as an enhancement. Instead of a written report, as students become more comfortable with evaluating online tools, ask them to use a multimedia presentation tool like Sway, reviewed here, to modify technology use and to discuss media bias and offer tips for evaluating online information.

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Play Your Dates Right - Class Tools

Grades
5 to 12
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Play Your Dates Right is another excellent learning game from a large assortment of resources available from Class Tools, reviewed here. Use this...more
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Play Your Dates Right is another excellent learning game from a large assortment of resources available from Class Tools, reviewed here. Use this resource to turn a timeline of events into an interactive quiz, browse through the sample quizzes for ideas. Type in a minimum of 10 chronological events following the format outlined in the help section. Click submit; then your game is ready to play. Use the share button to share the URL link, embed code, QR code, or web shortcut. Editor's Note: at the time of this writing, editing and sharing options are a little hard to find. Look behind the Class Tools logo at the bottom-right of the screen to locate them.

tag(s): quiz (75), quizzes (91), timelines (59)

In the Classroom

Create quizzes to correlate with current history lessons. Use your quiz to introduce any new time period or series of events as a pre-assessment, then continue sharing with students for use throughout your unit and as a review for your final assessment. Although created for use with dates, this site can also be modified to create quizzes for the order of events in stories and novels. Extend classroom technology use and student learning by having students create their own quizzes then share with peers as a review tool. Use the URL link and embed codes created to transform class tech use by including student-created quizzes within multimedia projects created using a presentation tool like Sway, reviewed here. After students create their quizzes, modify class tech use and learning by asking students to use a timeline creation tool like History in Motion, reviewed here, to add images, videos, and text to tell the entire story. Choose from other timeline creation tools located here.

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Moment Zero - Pilot

Grades
6 to 12
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Moment Zero is an immersive experience for viewing seismic activity around the world since 1970. View information in 360 degrees using computers and mobile devices, or in VR with a...more
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Moment Zero is an immersive experience for viewing seismic activity around the world since 1970. View information in 360 degrees using computers and mobile devices, or in VR with a headset and mobile phone. Use the options on the site to explore the yearly timeline and view annual statistics.

tag(s): earthquakes (52)

In the Classroom

There is a learning curve to using this site, be sure to take some time to explore the options on how to find different areas and information that is available. Consider choosing a couple of "tech-savvy" students to become experts on using the site. Ask them to use Free Screen Recorder Online, reviewed here, to record instructions about finding information, share these tutorials on your class website for student use. As students gather information and statistics from the site, use this as part of a larger activity as you learn about earthquakes. Create a class account for Google My Maps, reviewed here, and enhance student learning by recording earthquake activity around the world as they occur. Have students add images, videos, and vital statistics to this ongoing project.

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Expii Solve - Expii, Inc.

Grades
8 to 12
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Solve interactive math and science puzzles based on current events with Expii Solve. Choose from over 70 sets of questions with topics including the Super Bowl, Star Wars, holidays,...more
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Solve interactive math and science puzzles based on current events with Expii Solve. Choose from over 70 sets of questions with topics including the Super Bowl, Star Wars, holidays, and more. Each topic includes a set of five problems with each question increasing in difficulty. If you need help, use links to tutorials at the bottom of each question. Registration isn't required; however, registering allows you to track progress in completing puzzles.

tag(s): cultures (113), holidays (140), logic (250), problem solving (294)

In the Classroom

Be sure to save these puzzles for use throughout the school year. Use these problems as a substitute for your typical homework assignments. Include questions as part of math or science centers. Replace pencil and paper journals or notebooks by having students blog about their learning and understanding using Pen.io, reviewed here, Ask groups of students to work on topics together then share their results with the class. To enhance student learning and understanding, consider instituting a recurring podcast for students to share problems and discuss problem-solving strategies. Use a site such as podOmatic, reviewed here.

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History Tech - Glenn Wiebe

Grades
7 to 12
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History Tech is an outstanding blog for history and social studies teachers created by curriculum and technology integration consultant Glenn Wiebe. Wiebe shares resources and lesson...more
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History Tech is an outstanding blog for history and social studies teachers created by curriculum and technology integration consultant Glenn Wiebe. Wiebe shares resources and lesson ideas with a focus on game-based learning and technology integration. Browse through the blog's feed to view the latest posts, use the search box to search by keyword, or click on commonly used tagged words. To find specific topic content scroll down to the bottom of the home page and use the drop box featuring History Tech Topics. Be sure to sign up with your email address to receive the most recent posts directly to your inbox and follow the site on Twitter @glennw98.

tag(s): back to school (61), branches of government (57), digital storytelling (141), maps (295), politics (108), primary sources (98), social media (37), teaching strategies (31)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site to reference throughout the school year. Use the keyword search option to find ideas for specific units or technology tools to use. Use a bookmarking tool like Wakelet, reviewed here, to collect and share information from this blog along with your other resources. As you gather lesson ideas and create your unit, use Symbaloo Learning Paths, reviewed here, to create differentiated lesson activities for your students.

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Aquation - Smithsonian Science Education Center

Grades
7 to 12
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Play this game to solve the world's water crisis through careful management of resources and responses to global events. Before playing, be sure to check out the tutorial to understand...more
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Play this game to solve the world's water crisis through careful management of resources and responses to global events. Before playing, be sure to check out the tutorial to understand the available options. Your mission is to make water available to all regions through a series of decisions based on cost and research. Be sure to check out the text alternative short story to the game sharing a tale of the importance of water within a small community.

tag(s): conservation (121), DAT device agnostic tool (173), game based learning (146), recycling (60), water (136), weather (210)

In the Classroom

Include this activity with any unit on the environment, water cycles, or weather. Extend this activity further to learn more about water conservation in your community. Ask students to take pictures around the school or at home showing the inefficient use of water. Use PhotoCollage, reviewed here, and have students create a collage of their images to use as a starting point for research. Ask students to enhance their learning and upload their collage to a blog and write analyzing and sharing ideas for water conversation based on their collage. Use a blog tool such as Edublog, reviewed here. Use Symbaloo Learning Paths, reviewed here, to create a learning path for your students for your entire unit. Add videos, quizzes, embed this game and add all the information for students to follow. Symbaloo Learning Paths also includes options for differentiation for different interests or ability levels of your students. Ask older students to modify their learning and create their own Learning Path to demonstrate and share learning throughout the unit.

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Federal Deficit Reduction Plan Comparison Tool - Committe for a Responsible Federal Budget

Grades
8 to 12
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Use this interactive tool to compare and contrast different plan options for reduction of the federal deficit. Choose from the various plans offered on the site, then select categories...more
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Use this interactive tool to compare and contrast different plan options for reduction of the federal deficit. Choose from the various plans offered on the site, then select categories to view proposals. Compare up to three plans at one time. In addition to the online interactive, take advantage of the printer-friendly version to see full details of all of the ideas. Note: Although this interactive compares plans from 2010-2011, the information is still valuable for those interested in understanding the impact of policies on any budget.

tag(s): financial literacy (108), politics (108)

In the Classroom

Share this interactive with students to increase understanding of different budget options. Have students create a word cloud of the important terms they learn from this site using a tool such as Wordle, reviewed here. Use an online tool such as Interactive Two Circle Venn Diagram, reviewed here, to compare and contrast options found in different plans.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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