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60-Second Civics - Center for Civic Education

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5 to 12
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Listen to daily 60-second podcasts to learn about the United States government. Themes explored include constitutional issues related to today's headlines, presidential powers, and...more
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Listen to daily 60-second podcasts to learn about the United States government. Themes explored include constitutional issues related to today's headlines, presidential powers, and more--most episodes pertain to current events topics. In addition to the podcast, there is a daily quiz to check your knowledge of civics-related issues. Scroll down the page to find archives of recent topics, or use the keyword search to find podcasts related to any subject.

tag(s): branches of government (62), constitution (86), democracy (19), elections (80), electoral college (22), house of representatives (8), politics (113), senate (10), supreme court (27)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this podcast to use as a quick class-starter to review and discuss civics topics. If you don't have time to listen daily, consider setting aside 15-20 minutes a week to listen to podcasts from the week and to discuss the daily questions. Engage students in any topic by creating a Google Jamboard, reviewed here, that contains any of the daily questions. Ask students to share their thoughts and response using the sticky note tool. Extend learning by asking students to choose a topic of interest to research. Ask them to share their findings using one of the multimedia tools found at Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here. Options found at Adobe Express include creating graphics, webpages, and more.

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Teachers' Guide to Cranky Uncle - John Cook

Grades
6 to 12
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How do you teach students to understand and build resilience against misinformation? Try using this game created by George Mason University scientist John Cook which uses cartoon personifications...more
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How do you teach students to understand and build resilience against misinformation? Try using this game created by George Mason University scientist John Cook which uses cartoon personifications of climate science denials. The game is available to play on any browser or download the app from the Apple Store or Google Play. By teaching how others use fake experts and cherry-picking information to spread disinformation, this game engages players as they employ critical thinking skills to build points and learn how to separate fact from myth. The Teacher's Guide features all you need to know to understand how to set up the game for your class, the basic premise and information found in the game, and classroom activities that accompany the game's features.

tag(s): DAT device agnostic tool (142), digital citizenship (84), evaluating sources (28), game based learning (171), internet safety (112), media literacy (102), social media (53)

In the Classroom

Add this game to your toolkit of lessons and activities when teaching Internet safety and media literacy skills. The Teachers' Guide already includes many ideas on integrating the game into classroom lessons and includes using technology to enhance and extend learning. Use these ideas as a starting point to build student engagement and help them understand the real-world applications for the information found in the game. For example, use the suggested Padlet, reviewed here, activity to compile quiz questions as suggested in Activity 5. After completing that activity, have students create their own videos, fake social media posts, or news articles that contain misinformation and create quiz questions for their peers to complete. Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, is an excellent tool for students to use when creating websites, flyers, and infographics. As a final project, and to extend learning, have students share what they learned with others by producing podcasts using Buzzsprout, reviewed here, or digital books for younger students using Book Creator, reviewed here.

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Creative Visions - Creative Visions

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6 to 12
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This middle school and high school curriculum challenges students to think about issues and concerns faced in their communities and beyond, then develop campaigns to overcome the obstacles...more
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This middle school and high school curriculum challenges students to think about issues and concerns faced in their communities and beyond, then develop campaigns to overcome the obstacles found. Based upon Common Core Standards, the program includes over 70 lessons that begin engaging students through developing an understanding of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Lessons don't have to take place in the order offered; select lessons that fit the goals chosen for you and your students.

tag(s): civil rights (193), social and emotional learning (77), women (135)

In the Classroom

Include these free lessons in a variety of ways in your classroom. Use the content to help students understand social causes important to them and how to engage in their cause. This site offers various methods to create social issue campaigns, including music, film, and persuasive writing opportunities. Use this information to differentiate learning opportunities for students with activities that appeal to their interests.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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World's Largest Lesson - Project Everyone

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K to 12
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World's Largest Lesson provides resources for educators who teach students about 17 Global Goals created by the leaders of the 193 countries of the United Nations. Visit the Resources...more
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World's Largest Lesson provides resources for educators who teach students about 17 Global Goals created by the leaders of the 193 countries of the United Nations. Visit the Resources portion of the site to browse through the many activities. Narrow your search using the provided filters to locate information by grade level, topic, type of activity, and more. In addition, if you are interested in a particular goal, say Zero Hunger, find the poster with the 17 goals and click on Zero Hunger to find activities and lessons. Downloadable lessons include complete directions, printable worksheets, and key questions highlighted during the lesson. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable. This site would be a good one to leave for your substitute to use; it's high-interest, no sign-in, and has lesson plans & video clips.

tag(s): cross cultural understanding (156), earth (185), energy (131), engineering (117), environment (237), inequalities (23), maps (208), STEM (256), substitutes (27), sustainability (44)

In the Classroom

Discover the many free educational resources found on this site to include with your lessons about global cultures, the environment, health, and technology. Use the activities and lessons found on the World's Largest Lesson to engage students in understanding and processing information related to serious global issues. Have students use a collaborative whiteboard tool such as Jamboard, reviewed here, to brainstorm solutions to problems using the sticky note feature or to create mind maps and flow charts to organize further research. Enhance learning by asking students to create an interactive, choose your own adventure story using StoryLab, reviewed here. Ask students to use information learned from their lessons to create a story that tells what happens if the earth continues on its current course vs. what happens when suggested changes are implemented.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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A Starting Point - Chris Evans, Mark Kassen, and Joe Kiani

Grades
6 to 12
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A Starting Point is a bipartisan channel to create video communication channels that connect Americans with their elected officials. The website is divided into three main areas - Starting...more
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A Starting Point is a bipartisan channel to create video communication channels that connect Americans with their elected officials. The website is divided into three main areas - Starting Points, Daily Points, and Counterpoints. Starting Points provide two-minute answers to common questions asked of elected officials. Daily Points provide officials the opportunity to share their point of view through two-minute videos. Counterpoint offers the point of view from both sides of the aisle to the shared topics. This portion guides viewers through the opposing viewpoints that are then wrapped up with closing arguments.

tag(s): branches of government (62), civil rights (193), elections (80), foreign policy (12), immigration (64), politics (113)

In the Classroom

Share information from this site with students to demonstrate how to share different viewpoints on current events. This site also provides an opportunity to model how to use facts and information to present ideas and persuade others to consider opposing viewpoints. As students use these videos to compare and contrast viewpoints, use a curation tool such as Padlet, reviewed here, to share information from both sides. Use the shelf feature in Padlet to create columns to add content based on each side's viewpoint or use the map feature to add content found from different locations.

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Close Up - Close Up Foundation

Grades
6 to 12
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Close Up provides non-partisan civics resources for high schools and middle schools, including podcasts, videos, lesson plans aligned to Common Core Standards, Discussion Issues, and...more
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Close Up provides non-partisan civics resources for high schools and middle schools, including podcasts, videos, lesson plans aligned to Common Core Standards, Discussion Issues, and more. The content covers a broad range of topics, including campaigns and elections, coronavirus, and social issues. Use the filters found on the resource page to choose items by topic or type of resource. Some materials on the site are for purchase; use the checkbox to narrow resources to only free items.

tag(s): civil rights (193), congress (39), constitution (86), elections (80), environment (237)

In the Classroom

Use materials from Close Up to supplement your current civics lessons. Assign groups of students different articles or podcasts to analyze and share with peers. Enhance learning using Edpuzzle, reviewed here, to add comments and questions to videos for student consideration. Use Wakelet, reviewed here, to curate resources including articles and podcasts to share with students. Upon completing your teaching unit, ask students to use Wakelet as a multimedia presentation tool to create and share their learning by including written work, images, and links to reference materials.

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A Looming Plague: The Fight to Contain a New Locust Invasion - Tara John and Bethlehem Feleke, CNN

Grades
6 to 12
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Explore the reasons locusts threaten food security in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia with this CNN interactive. Scroll through to learn how the coronavirus pandemic is hampering the region's...more
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Explore the reasons locusts threaten food security in Kenya, Ethiopia, and Somalia with this CNN interactive. Scroll through to learn how the coronavirus pandemic is hampering the region's ability to implement efforts to fight the impending maturation of locusts that reproduce quickly and devastate crops. The interactive also takes viewers through a timeline of extreme weather events leading to the threat to African crops.

tag(s): africa (137), climate change (87), insects (67), weather (163)

In the Classroom

Include this interactive with lessons about African countries, climate change, weather, or insects. Engage students by exploring this site together using Microsoft Whiteboard, reviewed here, or Google Jamboard, reviewed here, to add notes, images, or create diagrams sharing students' thoughts. For older students, have them explore the site independently and share ideas on a collaborative whiteboard. Ask students to research the problems faced due to locusts and include information from previous infestations. As students conduct their research, use a collaborative site like Milanote, reviewed here, for groups to share articles, images, and brainstorm ideas. Extend learning further by asking students to become the problem solvers and share their suggestions for solving the problem both long term and short term. Provide options for groups to present their findings through various methods of digital media. For example, ask a group to use Google My Maps, reviewed here, to create a virtual tour of the problem areas and add images and notes with their suggestions. Have another group use tools found at Genially, reviewed here, to create a presentation that includes interactive images, infographics, and videos using templates found on the site.

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Resources to Develop a Positive Self-Identity - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy...more
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy self-esteem about their own self-identity, without devaluing the dignity of those that may be different than they are. The resources shared in this section help teachers to enable students to recognize that people have multiple identities and are members of multiple groups within our society, creating complex and unique individuals.

tag(s): bias (22), difficult conversations (58), identity (28)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to self-identity. This collection includes lesson plans, blogs, book suggestions, and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Resources Related to Difficult Conversations - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult...more
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult to discuss with students. The resources in this collection will give you ideas on how to start and facilitate tough conversations about topics like inequality, injustice, and politics sensitively while still accomplishing learning goals. You'll also find lessons and activities to encourage respectful conversation, inclusivity, empathy, and understanding.

tag(s): difficult conversations (58), empathy (26), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Explore this collection to use to engage in difficult conversations in your classroom. Learn more about difficult conversations and empathy for others in some of the informational readings.

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Understanding Empathy - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and...more
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and is an essential component of relationship building, resolving interpersonal conflicts, and understanding cause and effect. In this collection, we share resources that will help you create lessons and experiences that cultivate empathy in your students and informational websites about this important topic.

tag(s): empathy (26), perspective (11), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Help your students to develop empathy for others. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page or on your school's LMS.

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Resources on Racism and Discrimination - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism,...more
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism, and orientation discrimination can be difficult topics to broach in the classroom but are essential to discuss as students find their voices and form their understanding of the world. In this collection, we share resources about combatting racism, lesson plans about the human cost of discrimination, and additional activities to spark meaningful discussion and encourage students at all grade levels to treat all people with respect.

tag(s): black history (121), empathy (26), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to racism and discrimination. This collection includes lesson plans and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Civics in Real Life - Florida Joint Center for Citizenship

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6 to 12
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Expand civic literacy with weekly updates and resources from the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship. Each week the center adds civics concepts related to the current news. View topics...more
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Expand civic literacy with weekly updates and resources from the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship. Each week the center adds civics concepts related to the current news. View topics by date and title, then click to download. The downloads are one page PDF documents containing a short overview of the relevant topic along with a "To Think and To Do" activity.

tag(s): constitution (86), courts (19), elections (80), electoral college (22), holidays (159), politics (113), presidents (120), supreme court (27)

In the Classroom

Because this site offers weekly downloads, it is a great addition to use in any social studies classroom for civics lessons or providing ongoing civics discussions throughout the school year. Engage students by creating groups to explore concepts even further throughout the year. For example, divide your class into four or five groups, then have each group rotate throughout the month to take the information from a weekly update and conduct further research. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and share each of the activities for students to revisit and review the content. Take advantage of tools such as Google Slides, reviewed here, to focus student groups on learning activities. Create a slide template that includes students' areas to answer questions, reflect upon finding, and share resources used. Extend learning using podcasts as a final project for students to discuss and share their researched topic. Buzzsprout, reviewed here, is an excellent option for podcasting in the classroom because of the free features that include adding links and lists to podcasts and the ability to schedule podcasts release for your chosen date and time.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Fake News: Misinformation, Disinformation, and Malinformation - Pace University

Grades
4 to 12
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This helpful page provides information to help you understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay...more
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This helpful page provides information to help you understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay alert and recognize fake news. Be sure to look at Real New About Fake News and Other Resources of Interest. Use this resource as a news consumer's handbook that includes ways to identify and recognized fake news stories and resources.

tag(s): digital citizenship (84), internet safety (112), journalism (70), media literacy (102), news (228), Research (83)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources for teaching how to navigate online information. Include this website within a learning management system such as ActivelyLearn, reviewed here, to build a complete learning unit that includes articles, videos, and assessments that fully immerse and engage students in the learning activities. Enhance learning throughout the school year using Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and organize online information. For example, create a Padlet that includes a column for each of the four categories of fake news mentioned on this website, then ask students to share examples found during online use. Extend learning by asking students to become the teacher through presentations on how to recognize and avoid fake news. Provide a variety of options for student presentations including a comic creation tool like ToonyTool, reviewed here, Adobe Express Video Maker, reviewed here, to create simple video explainers, or use Minecraft Education Edition, reviewed here, and have students create a game to teach the hazards of disinformation.

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LGBTQ History and Why It Matters - FacingHistory.org

Grades
10 to 12
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Examine history through the lens of LGBTQ people and events with this lesson provided by FacingHistory.org. Challenging students to consider their current knowledge of history, students...more
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Examine history through the lens of LGBTQ people and events with this lesson provided by FacingHistory.org. Challenging students to consider their current knowledge of history, students participate in reflective and analytic activities that provide insight into experiences not included in typical historical narratives. This lesson includes printable exercises for students, along with suggestions for teaching strategies and extension activities.

tag(s): bias (22), civil rights (193), difficult conversations (58), sexuality (15)

In the Classroom

This lesson plan includes many excellent activities and resources that work well as a stand-alone lesson or to incorporate into your current history units as a supplement to provide a new perspective that highlights bias, gender, and civil rights issues. Discussing LBGTQ issues may lead to difficult conversations in the classroom; use this lesson to provide factual information within current history lessons. This site includes a variety of ideas and descriptions of teaching strategies that work well with any lesson. Be sure to bookmark this page to use as a reference for strategies to incorporate within many of your current units. One strategy mentioned is the use of exit cards as a reflective response or class discussion. Learn more about incorporating exit tickets as an authentic learning activity by viewing the archive of the July 2021 OK2Ask webinar, Measuring Authentic Learning Activities with Exit Slips, reviewed here. Consider sharing this lesson with your school's guidance counselor to use when counseling students who are dealing with identity or gender issues.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack - Peggy McIntosh

Grades
10 to 12
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This article from the National Seed Project discusses the concept of white privilege and identifies some of the daily effects of this privilege. Most notable in the article is the ...more
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This article from the National Seed Project discusses the concept of white privilege and identifies some of the daily effects of this privilege. Most notable in the article is the list of conditions the author defines as attached to skin color privilege compared to those based on class, religion, ethnic status, or geographic location. In addition to the article, a series of notes for facilitators is included for presenters using My White Privilege Papers series.

tag(s): bias (22), character education (75), civil rights (193), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Include this article with others as part of your ongoing professional development about racism and bias. It is also practical to use with older students as part of lessons on racism. Make it easier for students to break down the information in the article through the collaborative use of Fiskkit, reviewed here. Upload the article to Fiskkit and share the link with students. Ask them to highlight areas of interest and add comments. Follow the author's advice and encourage students to draw on personal experiences as part of their discussions. One method for sharing experiences is through the use of short audio discussions using PodcastGenerator, reviewed here.

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'Interrupt The Systems': Robin DiAngelo On 'White Fragility' And Anti-Racism - Ari Shapiro/NPR

Grades
9 to 12
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NPR's Like Kit series shares this article and audio from a recent podcast featuring a discussion with author Robin DiAngelo. DiAngelo shares suggestions for white people with specific...more
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NPR's Like Kit series shares this article and audio from a recent podcast featuring a discussion with author Robin DiAngelo. DiAngelo shares suggestions for white people with specific ideas on how to reflect upon their racism. Other recommendations include tips on how to educate yourself by engaging in resources created by people of color. This article contains many links to supplemental information, including books and a 21-Day Habit Building Challenge.

tag(s): authors (103), bias (22), character education (75), civil rights (193), difficult conversations (58), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources to discuss racism, bias, or when addressing difficult conversations in the classroom. Use a curation tool like Padlet, reviewed here, to share and discuss articles, videos, and online information. As students research and learn more from other authors, help them organize information using Webnote, reviewed here. Webnote is a virtual sticky note (think notecard) taking tool similar to the the physical sticky notes and can be used in place of 3X5 cards used for notetaking by hand. Use Webnote to keep a list of authors and articles, jot down big ideas, and compare suggestions for making positive changes.

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'Me And White Supremacy' Helps You Do The Work Of Dismantling Racism - Eric Deggans/NPR

Grades
9 to 12
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This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla ...more
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This article is part of the NPR Life Kit series that provides tips and advice for everyday problems from experts. Much of the article consists of an interview with Layla Saad, an East African, Black Muslim author. It includes defining terms such as "white-centering" and "ally cookies" to help readers understand white privilege. Another focus of the article is using journals to develop a conscious awareness of behaviors and thought processes.

tag(s): bias (22), black history (121), cross cultural understanding (156), identity (28), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other materials when teaching about racism, bias, identiy, or cross-cultural understanding. The interviewee shares responses in the article by raising questions for individuals to consider and use for reflection. Ask groups of students to take different questions to discuss and respond to as part of your article's discussion. Extend learning by asking them to share their findings by creating concept maps using a tool such as mindmaps, reviewed here, or with a presentation using tool like Prezi, reviewed here. Consider using Wakelet, reviewed here, as a curation tool for collecting and sharing resources with students, and also as a presentation tool for students to share their learning with peers.

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'Not Racist' Is Not Enough: Putting In The Work To Be Anti-Racist - Eric Deggans/NPR

Grades
8 to 12
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This article from National Public Radio (NPR) is part of their Life Kit series that provides advice from experts on everyday problems. The discussion focuses on the topic of racism...more
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This article from National Public Radio (NPR) is part of their Life Kit series that provides advice from experts on everyday problems. The discussion focuses on the topic of racism and suggestions on how to be anti-racist. The author shares four tips to use as guidelines on personal behaviors at home, work, and everyday life.

tag(s): bias (22), black history (121), cross cultural understanding (156), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other materials when discussing racism and bias. Engage students in a collaborative discussion of this article and others using Fiskkit, reviewed here. Add a link to the article in Fiskitt, then share with students to add questions and comments as they discuss the article together online. To help students focus on the topic, consider providing a list of possible questions before reading the article. Extend learning by asking students to use graphic organizers such as a 4-Circle Venn Diagram Creator, reviewed here, to compare and contrast information. For example, ask students to explore different media forms such as television, social media, podcasts, and literature and compare different presentations of racism and bias.

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Social Justice Standards: Unpacking Identity - Learning for Justice

Grades
8 to 12
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Learning for Justice. This lesson teaches...more
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Delve into the essential questions of how identity develops and how it affects our relationships with this professional development topic from Learning for Justice. This lesson teaches the five identity anchor standards and how identity affects relationships in a school and classrooms. Use the charts as a reflection piece to focus on your identity and learn through school-related scenarios on how to apply and teach anti-bias standards to students.

tag(s): character education (75), cross cultural understanding (156), difficult conversations (58), empathy (26), identity (28), professional development (384), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Use this course as an introduction to understanding bias and identity from both a personal and professional level. Adapt information from this course to include in your lessons on racism, empathy, and difficult conversations. For example, use the images and charts in the application section to identify and understand that first impression and physical characteristics don't always provide a complete picture of another person's identity. Include these activities as part of a larger teaching unit using a learning management system such as ClassFlow, reviewed here. ClassFlow includes many options for building interactive lessons that promote critical thinking skills through various response formats, media options, and teacher feedback.

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Whiteness Project: Millenials in Dallas, Texas - Whitney Dow

Grades
9 to 12
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The Whiteness Project features a series of interviews with millennials from Dallas, Texas. The short video interviews share their understanding of their whiteness. At the end of each...more
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The Whiteness Project features a series of interviews with millennials from Dallas, Texas. The short video interviews share their understanding of their whiteness. At the end of each interview, a statistic providing context is shared to encourage the viewing audience's self-reflection. View all of the statistics used on the site by selecting the data link at the top of the page.

tag(s): character education (75), civil rights (193), cross cultural understanding (156), cultures (132), difficult conversations (58), empathy (26), racism (76)

In the Classroom

The Whiteness Project provides a unique and interesting resource for introducing and discussing difficult topics in the classroom, including racism, prejudice, bias, and empathy. Share this site with students and provide them time to listen to some of the conversations and the provided statistics. Encourage students to choose one statistic as a starting point for additional research. For example, one piece of data shared is the number of adults who have two or more races in their background. This provides a starting point for researching race in your community, state, or in the country. As students complete research, ask them to share their findings in a multimedia presentation using a tool like Sway, reviewed here, to add graphs, charts, images, and video that support their findings.

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