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Resources to Develop a Positive Self-Identity - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy...more
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Encourage your students to develop positive self-identities based on their membership in various groups in society. Help your students to feel confident to express pride and healthy self-esteem about their own self-identity, without devaluing the dignity of those that may be different than they are. The resources shared in this section help teachers to enable students to recognize that people have multiple identities and are members of multiple groups within our society, creating complex and unique individuals.

tag(s): bias (22), difficult conversations (58), identity (28)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to self-identity. This collection includes lesson plans, blogs, book suggestions, and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Resources Related to Difficult Conversations - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult...more
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As teachers, we frequently tackle uncomfortable subjects in the classroom, but polarizing public conversations or events in the news can sometimes make these subjects downright difficult to discuss with students. The resources in this collection will give you ideas on how to start and facilitate tough conversations about topics like inequality, injustice, and politics sensitively while still accomplishing learning goals. You'll also find lessons and activities to encourage respectful conversation, inclusivity, empathy, and understanding.

tag(s): difficult conversations (58), empathy (26), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Explore this collection to use to engage in difficult conversations in your classroom. Learn more about difficult conversations and empathy for others in some of the informational readings.

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Understanding Empathy - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and...more
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Empathy is our desire and ability to understand and share another person's feelings and use that information to guide our actions. It's the foundation of respect and inclusivity and is an essential component of relationship building, resolving interpersonal conflicts, and understanding cause and effect. In this collection, we share resources that will help you create lessons and experiences that cultivate empathy in your students and informational websites about this important topic.

tag(s): empathy (26), perspective (11), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Help your students to develop empathy for others. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page or on your school's LMS.

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Resources on Racism and Discrimination - TeachersFirst

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K to 12
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism,...more
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As educators, it's our duty to teach our students to respect people of all races, genders, orientations, and cultures, both in our classroom and in the outside world. Racism, sexism, and orientation discrimination can be difficult topics to broach in the classroom but are essential to discuss as students find their voices and form their understanding of the world. In this collection, we share resources about combatting racism, lesson plans about the human cost of discrimination, and additional activities to spark meaningful discussion and encourage students at all grade levels to treat all people with respect.

tag(s): black history (121), empathy (26), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Find resources to educate yourself and your students about various topics related to racism and discrimination. This collection includes lesson plans and interactives too. Share these resources with your colleagues and families.

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Civics in Real Life - Florida Joint Center for Citizenship

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6 to 12
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Expand civic literacy with weekly updates and resources from the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship. Each week the center adds civics concepts related to the current news. View topics...more
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Expand civic literacy with weekly updates and resources from the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship. Each week the center adds civics concepts related to the current news. View topics by date and title, then click to download. The downloads are one page PDF documents containing a short overview of the relevant topic along with a "To Think and To Do" activity.

tag(s): constitution (86), courts (19), elections (80), electoral college (22), holidays (159), politics (113), presidents (119), supreme court (27)

In the Classroom

Because this site offers weekly downloads, it is a great addition to use in any social studies classroom for civics lessons or providing ongoing civics discussions throughout the school year. Engage students by creating groups to explore concepts even further throughout the year. For example, divide your class into four or five groups, then have each group rotate throughout the month to take the information from a weekly update and conduct further research. Use Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and share each of the activities for students to revisit and review the content. Take advantage of tools such as Google Slides, reviewed here, to focus student groups on learning activities. Create a slide template that includes students' areas to answer questions, reflect upon finding, and share resources used. Extend learning using podcasts as a final project for students to discuss and share their researched topic. Buzzsprout, reviewed here, is an excellent option for podcasting in the classroom because of the free features that include adding links and lists to podcasts and the ability to schedule podcasts release for your chosen date and time.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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Fake News: Misinformation, Disinformation, and Malinformation - Pace University

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4 to 12
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This helpful page provides information to help you understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay...more
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This helpful page provides information to help you understand how to verify news resources for research purposes. This resource guides the readers through suggested tips on how to stay alert and recognize fake news. Be sure to look at Real New About Fake News and Other Resources of Interest. Use this resource as a news consumer's handbook that includes ways to identify and recognized fake news stories and resources.

tag(s): digital citizenship (84), internet safety (112), journalism (70), media literacy (102), news (228), Research (82)

In the Classroom

Include this article with your other resources for teaching how to navigate online information. Include this website within a learning management system such as ActivelyLearn, reviewed here, to build a complete learning unit that includes articles, videos, and assessments that fully immerse and engage students in the learning activities. Enhance learning throughout the school year using Padlet, reviewed here, to curate and organize online information. For example, create a Padlet that includes a column for each of the four categories of fake news mentioned on this website, then ask students to share examples found during online use. Extend learning by asking students to become the teacher through presentations on how to recognize and avoid fake news. Provide a variety of options for student presentations including a comic creation tool like ToonyTool, reviewed here, Adobe Express Video Maker, reviewed here, to create simple video explainers, or use Minecraft Education Edition, reviewed here, and have students create a game to teach the hazards of disinformation.

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Design for Change USA - Design for Change

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K to 8
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Design for Change uses a virtual platform to engage students and build social awareness through activities that critically look at themes. Create an account to view your dashboard and...more
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Design for Change uses a virtual platform to engage students and build social awareness through activities that critically look at themes. Create an account to view your dashboard and options found on the site. Content is based upon three themes - Racial Injustice, Educational Equity, and Climate Action and is delivered in a content framework of feel, imagine, do, and share. Lessons begin with an empathy warmup podcast. The following steps engage students in understanding the problem of each theme before developing suggested solutions. Download educator toolkits for all activities found using your account dashboard.

tag(s): character education (75), climate (80), climate change (87), empathy (26), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Bookmark activities and podcasts shared in this site to use when teaching about racial bias, empathy, and climate. Download the educator's toolkit to use as an excellent resource for graphic organizers for students to organize information and plan action steps for multiple different uses. As a culminating activity, engage learners to share their ideas by creating digital books using Book Creator, reviewed here. Have students create books that include images, videos, and written text that share their ideas on steps to take to address social issues.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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SpeakUp! - Martie Gillin

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5 to 12
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SpeakUp! is a non-profit organization that provides resources to support teens in developing positive relationships with adults. Their programs' focus is on encouraging teens to have...more
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SpeakUp! is a non-profit organization that provides resources to support teens in developing positive relationships with adults. Their programs' focus is on encouraging teens to have supportive conversations that help teens deal with any issues. Register for upcoming programs or learn how to become a SpeakUp! school. Be sure to check out the link to the site's resources that includes helpful guides with contact information for help with many different topics, including suicide, drug abuse, bullying, and more.

tag(s): bullying (49), cyberbullying (40), diseases (66), drugs and alcohol (27), eating disorders (7), sexuality (15), social and emotional learning (76), social media (53)

In the Classroom

Share the resource guides with parents and students on your class website to use when facing any of the covered topics. Use Padlet, reviewed here, or Wakelet, reviewed here, to curate and share helpful guides for parents and students within one collection. As you and your class discuss problems that face teens, ask students to use Canva Edu, reviewed here, to share what they learn. For example, have students create posters to display in the classroom that include the dangers of drug abuse and include tips for helping someone that displays signs of drug abuse. Ask other students to design and share infographics that include facts and figures discussing cyberbullying, along with suggestions on how to respond to bullies.
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Preparing Students for Difficult Conversations - FacingHistory.org

Grades
6 to 12
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This lesson provides a foundation for creating a safe and supportive classroom to discuss difficult issues. It is part of a larger unit based upon the shooting of Michael Brown ...more
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This lesson provides a foundation for creating a safe and supportive classroom to discuss difficult issues. It is part of a larger unit based upon the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and the racial tension that followed the shooting. Although the focus is on Ferguson, easily use this example lesson with any other difficult topics. This lesson includes a video, student materials, and additional resources, including supplemental articles to use in discussions.

tag(s): civil rights (193), journalism (70), media literacy (102), racism (76), social media (53)

In the Classroom

As an introduction to the lesson, one of the activities is to ask students to brainstorm a list of teens' news resources and a list of news resources used by parents or older people. Use Microsoft Whiteboard, reviewed here, or Google Jamboard, reviewed here, to create and analyze your lists. Use the whiteboard tools to create lists, Venn Diagrams, and add notes to extend student reflections on different news sources. Turn the Know-Heard-Learned Chart included in the lesson into an editable worksheet to use as a collaborative document to record student understanding of any events' timeline.

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Say Their Names - Chicago Public Schools

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K to 12
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This Google document shares strategies and suggestions to help parents and educators discuss race, racism, racial violence, bias, and racial justice. The document includes recommendations...more
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This Google document shares strategies and suggestions to help parents and educators discuss race, racism, racial violence, bias, and racial justice. The document includes recommendations and links to resources on how to start difficult conversations, where to find resources, mental health resources, and how to teach students to understand and evaluate information found in the media. Be sure to check back often; this document updates on an ongoing basis.

tag(s): civil rights (193), courts (19), politics (113), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Bookmark and save this document as a guide to discussing racism in the classroom and as a link to many additional materials. Organize your resources using a curation tool such as Padlet, reviewed here. Use the shelf option in Padlet to create columns to organize information. For example, create columns to sort materials by grade levels or by type of content. As you teach lessons, use a mind mapping tool like Coggle, reviewed here, to organize and share complex information. Extend learning using Adobe Express Video Maker, reviewed here, to create student-produced explainer videos sharing their ideas on addressing racism, media literacy strategies, or steps to help others through difficult times.

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The Lowdown: The Obama Years, A Retrospective Lesson Plan - PBS Learning Media

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6 to 12
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Explore the achievements and setbacks of Barack Obama's presidency in this lesson that includes an interactive timeline of his eight years in office. The lesson plan includes essential...more
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Explore the achievements and setbacks of Barack Obama's presidency in this lesson that includes an interactive timeline of his eight years in office. The lesson plan includes essential questions, vocabulary, and suggestions for small group or individual instruction. Activities are correlated to Common Core Standards, or sign in using a free account to link activities to your state standards.

tag(s): 20th century (59), black history (121), presidents (119)

In the Classroom

As you explore the interactive timeline together as a class or with small groups, use a simple polling tool like SurveyPlanet, reviewed here, to assess student understanding of the different events on the timeline. Use SurveyPlanet to add each event to a poll and ask students to weigh in on their opinion on if the event was an accomplishment or a setback to the Obama administration. Use an online curation tool such as Padlet, reviewed here, to organize and share additional resources with students to enhance learning. For example, create a Padlet with columns for each year of the Obama presidency and add online articles from different resources that discuss each event. Extend learning by asking students to apply their knowledge of the Obama presidency and compare it to another president's term in office using one of the storytelling tools found at Knight Lab, reviewed here. Scroll down Knight Lab's main page to find options that include a Storyline to tell the stories behind numbers, StoryMap - maps that tell numbers, and a timeline creation tool.
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Today's News, Tomorrow's Lesson - Share My Lesson

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6 to 12
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Today's News, Tomorrow's Lesson brings the latest news and current events into your classroom with timely information, videos, and discussion questions from PBS NewsHour Extra. Select...more
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Today's News, Tomorrow's Lesson brings the latest news and current events into your classroom with timely information, videos, and discussion questions from PBS NewsHour Extra. Select any post to open the resource and read more about the prompt or question. Articles share a summary of the issue along with the video clip from the PBS NewsHour discussion. In addition to discussion questions, this site also includes extension activities to enhance learning. This site doesn't require registration; however, creating an account allows you to save favorites to collections for later use. The videos are hosted on YouTube. If your district blocks YouTube, then they may not be viewable.

tag(s): journalism (70), news (228), politics (113)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site for use with any current events lessons and as a resource for finding fact-based information to use to help understand modern history. Most of the discussion questions ask students to defend a point of view based on the shared topic. Use technology tools to help students organize their thinking and share their questions and responses. Engage students in the learning process using Fiskkit, reviewed here, as a collaborative discussion tool for sharing online articles related to the topic discussed. Fiskkit offers tools for annotating and collaboratively discussing online information. Share student opinions and discussions using Flip, reviewed here. Ask students to respond to the discussion question within Flip using their fact-based research. Use the comment feature to encourage collaboration and student discussion. As a final project, extend learning by asking students (or student groups) to share their responses as part of a multimedia presentation that includes student writing, videos, maps, and infographics. Have students use a presentation tool such as Sway, reviewed here, or Adobe Creative Cloud Express for Education, reviewed here, to share their final projects.

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News and Media Literacy Resource Center - Common Sense Media

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6 to 12
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This collection of vetted resources provides activities and lessons for current news and social discussion topics. In addition to materials found for specific lessons, scroll further...more
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This collection of vetted resources provides activities and lessons for current news and social discussion topics. In addition to materials found for specific lessons, scroll further down the page to find curated collections for news and literacy, media literacy, and social and cultural literacy. Each collection includes regularly updated resources specially chosen to reinforce and practice each literacy skill. Pay particular attention to activities with a green heart icon; these are the site's favorite resources.

tag(s): bias (22), journalism (70), media literacy (102), news (228), social media (53)

In the Classroom

Bookmark this site to take advantage of the many curated resources for teaching media and news literacy. Use a curation tool like Padlet, reviewed here, to save and share favorite resources found on this site with students. Use the shelf option in Padlet to create columns and organize information by topic, type of content, or for use by different groups of students. Enhance instruction by asking students to become creators of information as they share their learning. Have students use Canva Infographic Maker, reviewed here, to create infographics to demonstrate different forms of media bias or to share facts learned from news articles. Extend learning even further by asking students to create blogs using edublogs, reviewed here, to demonstrate how to write and share the news using credible information and factual resources.
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Comments

This is such a valuable resource and it's so helpful to have one collection that I know has been vetted with accurate, useful information that teachers can use for themselves as well as with their students. I also love the "In the Classroom" section with suggestions for ways to use the information and resources. Peggy, AZ, Grades: 0 - 8

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Talking About Race and Privilege: Lesson Plan for Middle and High School Students - National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

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6 to 12
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This lesson plan guides students toward defining the concept of "privilege" and to identify examples of "privilege" in their lives. The lesson begins with using the Webster's Dictionary...more
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This lesson plan guides students toward defining the concept of "privilege" and to identify examples of "privilege" in their lives. The lesson begins with using the Webster's Dictionary definition of "privilege" and then leads to historical perspectives on "privilege" related to race in the United States. Another component of the lesson is the use of the Privilege Aptitude Test adapted from the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel with follow-up reflection questions. Use the link to print or download the lesson in PDF format.

tag(s): civil rights (193), psychology (67), racism (76)

In the Classroom

Include this lesson plan with your other resources when teaching lessons on racism and social injustice, either in-person or through remote or blended learning situations. Instead of using paper charts as mentioned in the lesson, use a digital chart creation resource such as Lucidchart, reviewed here, to create collaborative digital workspaces. Lucidchart includes several features that expand learning through the use of commenting, real-time collaboration, and colorful visual displays. Guide students in how to think through reflection questions using topics available in Thinkalong, reviewed here. Thinkalong offers an interactive multimedia format that guides students through investigations that lead them to contemplate possible solutions to serious problems.
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Coronavirus Resource Page for Students - New York Times Learning Network

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6 to 12
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This New York Times page features a curation of coronavirus-related articles, picture prompts, and opinion pieces suitable for students. Scroll through to find the latest articles sharing...more
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This New York Times page features a curation of coronavirus-related articles, picture prompts, and opinion pieces suitable for students. Scroll through to find the latest articles sharing updates on coronavirus information from the US and around the world. Use the search feature to look for specific keywords or to sort by the newest or oldest articles.
This site includes advertising.

tag(s): diseases (66), journalism (70), news (228), newspapers (91)

In the Classroom

Engage students in learning about the coronavirus by sharing this link with students on your class website. Ask them to browse through information on the site, including opinion pieces as a starting point for writing an opinion piece. Guide students toward learning techniques for presenting a persuasive argument by viewing the site ProCon, reviewed here, to demonstrate methods for sharing both sides of an argument. Take advantage of the many picture prompts shared by the New York Times to encourage student creativity. Use Flip, reviewed here, to promote student voice by sharing a picture prompt from this site and asking students to share their ideas. Be sure to turn on and allow commenting to promote student collaboration and discussion.

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Thinkalong - Conneticut Public

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6 to 12
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Improve and build students' critical thinking skills, debate skills, and media literacy using Thinkalong. Present students with provocative questions such as "Are Self-Driving Cars...more
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Improve and build students' critical thinking skills, debate skills, and media literacy using Thinkalong. Present students with provocative questions such as "Are Self-Driving Cars Safe? Should performance-enhancing drugs be allowed in professional sports? Should schools provide a laptop and internet for every student? Should social media companies be allowed to sell your data?" to name a few of the many topics. Topics focus on science, social studies, and current events. After clicking a topic, find three main categories: Teachers (a teacher's guide), Investigate (usually a graphic organizer), and Contemplate (question the authorship, format, audience purpose, etc.). However, that's not all! Under those categories, you'll find even move resources listed as Watch, Listen, Think Deep, and Contemplate (deeper thinking questions about the message); after all this, students have the opportunity to test their opinions through a structured debate in class or online with another class. Although the resource states it's for middle school students, these lessons could easily be adapted for high school.

tag(s): critical thinking (112), debate (37), inquiry (23), media literacy (102), news (228), persuasive writing (55), Research (82)

In the Classroom

Whether teaching in a classroom or online, scan the included PDF or Word documents into Google Classroom or your school student/teacher platform to share and assign to students. Enhance student learning by asking students to use highlighting and note-taking tools within their word document to provide documentation for their responses. To prepare students for Common Core Assessments on evidence and arguments, have them choose a popular topic, research it (with the materials provided) so they can provide evidence for their stance when writing about their opinion or to refute another's. The debate section is the perfect opportunity to teach students about countering an opposing opinion, deciding which is the strongest point, and then teach them how to address concerns of others in their writing or debate. For example, they can concede it is a valid point and then counter with another strong argument. Consider sharing the activities found on this site with your peers as a model for redesigning lessons you already use in your classroom (for online learning during absences and crises?). Use Padlet, reviewed here, to collaborate and share ideas, activities, and resources as you work toward incorporating inquiry lessons into your classrooms.

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Coronavirus Lesson Plans and Resources - Share My Lesson

Grades
K to 12
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This collection of coronavirus resources provides an excellent starting point for finding lessons, posters, and ideas for remote teaching for all grade levels. Materials include coronavirus...more
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This collection of coronavirus resources provides an excellent starting point for finding lessons, posters, and ideas for remote teaching for all grade levels. Materials include coronavirus facts, history lessons relating to pandemics, and distance learning tips and hints. Choose any link to view a summary of the content, register to gain free access to all teaching materials.

tag(s): diseases (66), hygiene (9), preK (254)

In the Classroom

Be sure to see the many free resources found on this site for use during health lessons. Add the ideas for implementing remote learning to your toolkit of ideas to use for unexpected school shutdowns due to weather, power failure, or any other unforeseen circumstances. Use Wakelet, reviewed here, to create templates for student lessons and responses, then copy the template and edit to fit the needs of your remote lesson. Incorporate the coronavirus lessons into your current health and science lessons to teach students about the spread of disease. Enhance learning by using Google My Maps, reviewed here, for digital storytelling to demonstrate the flow of diseases across the globe. Ask students to use an animated video creation tool like Powtoon, reviewed here, to share their understanding of the spread of disease. Create your video together with younger students, or ask older students to create videos to demonstrate learning.
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Understanding Public Health Crises - TeachersFirst

Grades
K to 12
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The potential of a pandemic spread in our schools and among young people is a major concern. TeachersFirst's editors have collected this helpful information for teachers, students,...more
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The potential of a pandemic spread in our schools and among young people is a major concern. TeachersFirst's editors have collected this helpful information for teachers, students, and parents to better understand pandemics, how they spread, and what you can do to stay healthy. We have also included numerous resources sharing ways that teachers are available to help through remote teaching, disseminating correct information, teaching students media literacy, and promoting proper hygiene. Share these resources with your colleagues and families to keep them informed during public health crises.

tag(s): h1n1 (6), hygiene (9), media literacy (102)

In the Classroom

Help your students to stay healthy and avoid fear by sharing the facts and prevention tips in these resources. Share these resources with your colleagues and school parents by emailing the page or sharing the link from your school web page and in your school newsletter.

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Coronavirus Resources: Teaching, Learning and Thinking Critically - New York Times and Katherine Schulten

Grades
3 to 12
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Stay up to date with the latest information for working, at school or home, using the information found online at the New York Times. Resources include weekly quizzes, writing prompts,...more
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Stay up to date with the latest information for working, at school or home, using the information found online at the New York Times. Resources include weekly quizzes, writing prompts, interactive graphs, and much more. Suggested prompts employ information found on the front page of the newspaper as the starting point for KWL (what you know, want to know, what you learned) charts, and exploration of graphs and charts. Additional activities include questions that promote critical thinking and debate, along with links to resources to use within these debates.

tag(s): diseases (66), Online Learning (39), professional development (382)

In the Classroom

Be sure to bookmark this site as an important resource for lessons about the coronavirus and also as a resource for implementing online teaching activities. Incorporate ideas and activities found on this site into a blended learning system such as ActivelyLearn, reviewed here or Curipod, reviewed here. Both of these sites include features to create remote lessons with text, videos, and quizzes and provide educators instant feedback on student understanding. As students develop an understanding of the effects and makeup of the coronavirus, use Annotely, reviewed here, to upload and label an image sharing their knowledge. For example, have younger students upload a picture of their home, then label different surfaces with a short sentence on how they can spread or receive germs. For older students, ask them to use Annotely to label the different areas found in the community that leads to the spread of disease.
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Reading Treks: Every Single Second - TeachersFirst

Grades
4 to 8
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration...more
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TeachersFirst Reading Treks create a virtual field trip of resources about a piece of literature or text using the My Maps feature of Google Maps. This Reading Trek provides inspiration and suggestions for using the trade book, Every Single Second. In Every Single Second Nella lives in a blue-collar, Little Italy neighborhood where her life is changing as racism is tearing apart her community. This book is a coming-of-age story with an examination of change. Nella learns every second matters and the importance of empathy and kindness. Use our robust Instructional Guide with students in grades 5-9. Content correlates to Common Core Standards, ISTE Student Standards, National Core Arts Standards for Visual Arts, and National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies. Find the entire selection of Reading Treks here.

tag(s): character education (75), empathy (26), family (53), racism (76), virtual field trips (79)

In the Classroom

Take advantage of the many suggested classroom uses for this resource found on the Instructional Guide (PDF). Include this Reading Trek as part of lessons in empathy, racism, and character traits. Consider using content from the book as an inspiration to have students create a timeline of their friends. Find a variety of free online timeline creation tools located here. Using the map and locales, trace and then calculate distances for some Little Italy locations. Use Google My Maps, reviewed here to create and share custom maps.
 This resource requires PDF reader software like Adobe Acrobat.

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